Video comprehension questions: Who was William Dawson, and what was his role in Chicago politics?



Download 16.47 Kb.
Date conversion29.04.2016
Size16.47 Kb.

TITLE OF VIDEO:

The Promised Land: We Stand at the Crossroads


VIDEO COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS:

1. Who was William Dawson, and what was his role in Chicago politics?

2. What was meant by the term “plantation politics”?

3. Who was Roscoe Johnson, and what was the reaction to his breaking through the color line?

4. What were the “ghettos in the sky”?

5. What was the cause preached by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., at Soldier Field in 1966?

6. When did the civil rights movement change direction to the tactics that had won in the South?

7. How was Dr. King described following his assassination?

8. How far is it from the Robert Taylor projects to Chicago's city hall, and what is the significance of this distance?

9. Who were the father and son mayors of Chicago, and how was the father regarded during his tenure?

10. What “gigantic historical changes” have three generations of African Americans and, in a sense, all Americans experienced during their lifetimes?

DiscoverySchool.com

http://www.discoveryschool.com
Copyright 2001 Discovery.com.

Teachers may reproduce copies of these materials for classroom use only. See next page for answers.





The Promised Land: We Stand at the Crossroads
VIDEO COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS:

1. Who was William Dawson, and what was his role in Chicago politics?

William Dawson was an Illinois congressman who was Mayor Daley's most useful ally in his attempts to control the black citizens of Chicago.



2. What was meant by the term “plantation politics”?

The term “plantation politics” refers to the expectation that the political machine required individuals to conduct themselves as the leaders directed.



3. Who was Roscoe Johnson, and what was the reaction to his breaking through the color line?

Roscoe Johnson was the first black man to move into a previously all white Chicago neighborhood. Mobs accosted him and threw things through his windows. When he appeared with a shotgun, which he did not fire, he was arrested.



4. What were the “ghettos in the sky”?

The “ghettos in the sky” were the high-rise projects, such as the Robert Taylor homes, which sprung up in Chicago and which led to the “perpendicular segregation” of the period.



5. What was the cause preached by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., at Soldier Field in 1966?

Dr. King preached the cause of non-violence, a commitment which he reaffirmed at Soldier Field in July of 1966, when he said that the “negro needs the white man to free him from his fears, and the white man needs the negro to free him from his guilt.”



6. When did the civil rights movement change direction to the tactics that had won in the South?

The civil rights movement in Chicago changed direction in July of 1966 when the spotlight was turned onto Chicago's housing segregation and the black inability to leave the ghettos instead of directing protests against the conditions found in the slums.



7. How was Dr. King described following his assassination?

Dr. King was described as more than a father and more than a preacher. To many he was regarded as almost a savior.



8. How far is it from the Robert Taylor projects to Chicago's city hall, and what is the significance of this distance?

The distance from the Robert Taylor projects to Chicago's city hall was only four miles, but it may as well have been 400 miles, since the emotional and political distance seemed infinite. City hall was the seat of political power.



9. Who were the father and son mayors of Chicago, and how was the father regarded during his tenure?

Richard J. Daley served as Chicago's mayor in the 50s, 60s and 70s, and his son, Richard M. Daley, became Chicago's mayor in 1989. In his day Mayor Richard J. Daley was regarded as the most powerful city boss in America.



10. What “gigantic historical changes” have three generations of African Americans and, in a sense, all Americans experienced during their lifetimes?

During the lifetimes of three generations, African Americans have experienced slavery, emancipation, and migration.



DiscoverySchool.com

http://www.discoveryschool.com
Copyright 2001 Discovery.com.

Teachers may reproduce copies of these materials for classroom use only.


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page