Video comprehension questions: In what ways do “natural organic” and planned cities differ in how they emerge and grow?



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Understanding: Cities


VIDEO COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS:

1. In what ways do “natural organic” and planned cities differ in how they emerge and grow?

2. Most of the world's major cities have remained well-established since they began, but a few cities that once flourished are now abandoned. What happened to Teotihuacan, the pre-Columbian city of the Aztecs in Mexico?

3. What was London's solution to street traffic gridlock during the Industrial Revolution?

4. What helped create the “24-hour city?”

5. How did the United States become the most urbanized country in the world in only half a century?

6. Urban growth was stalled in the United States during the Depression. When growth began again following World War II, why did it extend outward to the suburbs?

7. Twenty years ago, city planners in Portland, Oregon, saw the deterioration of the downtown area becoming a major problem. How did they solve this problem, and what was the result of their efforts?

8. How is daily life inconvenient, if not dangerous, in Brasilia, Brazil?

DiscoverySchool.com

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Copyright 2001 Discovery.com.

Teachers may reproduce copies of these materials for classroom use only. See next page for answers.





Understanding: Cities
VIDEO COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS:

1. In what ways do “natural organic” and planned cities differ in how they emerge and grow?

Natural organic cities usually emerge for a particular reason, such as an available water supply, and then grow naturally, like a living thing. Planned cities, such as Rome, are usually designed in a comprehensive and orderly fashion, laid out on a grid, and built by people with a specific purpose in mind.



2. Most of the world's major cities have remained well-established since they began, but a few cities that once flourished are now abandoned. What happened to Teotihuacan, the pre-Columbian city of the Aztecs in Mexico?

In the city of Teotihuacan, ethnic and class differences separated the people. The city's carrying capacity was heavily taxed. And disease and war with the Spanish took their tolls on the population. Eventually, the city was abandoned.



3. What was London's solution to street traffic gridlock during the Industrial Revolution?

Engineers built the first underground subway system deep in tunnels below the city. The London Underground (or “Tube”) opened in 1858, and the age of commuting began.



4. What helped create the “24-hour city?”

Both Thomas Edison's 1879 invention of the light bulb, which harnessed electricity, and underground electrical wiring enabled the cities to run 24 hours per day.



5. How did the United States become the most urbanized country in the world in only half a century?

The United States quickly became the most urbanized country in the world as a result of the Industrial Revolution and subsequent massive immigration. Factories attracted workers to cities, and similar opportunities for work also drew immigrants to the United States.



6. Urban growth was stalled in the United States during the Depression. When growth began again following World War II, why did it extend outward to the suburbs?

After World War II, U.S. government policies, such as spending on interstate highways rather than mass transit, discouraged people from living in cities and encouraged them to live in the suburbs.



7. Twenty years ago, city planners in Portland, Oregon, saw the deterioration of the downtown area becoming a major problem. How did they solve this problem, and what was the result of their efforts?

Reformers in Portland, Oregon, tore up a freeway that cut through the city center, redirected highway funds to build a new light rail system in the downtown district, established the Portland Development Commission to serve as a civic-minded land development body, and set a legal limit on expansion by creating an urban growth boundary. All of these efforts brought people back to the downtown area-boosting commerce and civic pride-and helped to avoid urban deterioration.



8. How is daily life inconvenient, if not dangerous, in Brasilia, Brazil?

Daily life in Brasilia is inconvenient because the city was designed so automobiles could move freely, but pedestrian movement is restricted. With few traffic lights or sidewalks to protect walkers, Brasilia has one of the highest pedestrian death rates in the world.



DiscoverySchool.com

http://www.discoveryschool.com
Copyright 2001 Discovery.com.

Teachers may reproduce copies of these materials for classroom use only.


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