Ushx: Section 2: Building a Strong Nation drill: Judiciary Act & Loose Construction Judiciary Act



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USHX: Section 3.2: Building a Strong Nation



DRILL: Judiciary Act & Loose Construction

Judiciary Act, creating the federal court system in 1789.

Loose Construction, meaning that the federal government could take reasonable actions that were not listed in the Constitution.
Students will be able to explain Tousaint L’Overture’s role in the Louisiana Purchase by researching information about the Lewis and Clark expedition and the War of 1812.
Notes:

1. Thomas Jefferson was sworn in as president on March 4, 1801.

2. Marbury v. Madison decision, the Supreme Court established judicial review.

3. Judicial Review - Court had the right to declare a law unconstitutional.

4. In 1803 the U.S. Senate approved the Louisiana Purchase

5. Jefferson sent a small expedition led by Lewis and Clark to explore the West.

6. The British navy had begun stopping American ships and taking U.S. citizens.

7. In 1812 Congress declared war on Britain for violating U.S. neutrality.

8. In 1814 the British captured Washington, then attacked Baltimore and Fort McHenry.
Odds & Ends

1. During their explorations, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark visited the Shoshoni and hired Sacagawea as a guide

2. The Embargo Act hurt the U.S. economy more than it hurt the British or French economies.

3. Tecumseh worked to form a confederation to stop settlers from claiming Indian land.

4. The Treaty of Ghent returned all territory and ended the War of 1812.

5. In the Monroe Doctrine, President Monroe warned European nations not to colonize/interfere with Latin America.

6. The Missouri Compromise allowed Missouri (slave) & Maine (free) to enter the Union, thus maintaining the balance of slave and free states.

7. The Tariff of 1828 prompted Vice President John C. Calhoun to argue that states could nullify federal laws, based on his belief in states’ rights.

8. Congress established the Bureau of Indian Affairs to oversee federal policy concerning Indians during the War of 1812.

9. Osceola a famous war chief of the Seminole Indians in Florida fought Andrew Jackson and US forces keep their lands.


USHX: Section 3.2: Building a Strong Nation



1. T

2. F; Sacagawea served a guides for a large part of the trip.

3. T

4. T

5. F; The treaty returned all conquered territory.

6. F; European nations were warned not to colonize or interfere in the Americas.

7. T

8. T

9. F; The Bureau of Indian Affairs was established to oversee federal policy.

10. F; Osceola led the Seminole in battle against the U.S. Army to fight removal to Indian Territory.





11. Tousaint’s slave revolt caused Napoleon to rethink his plans for America and the Louisiana Territory.

12. After the British captured Washington and set fire to the White House, Baltimore soldiers won a decisive battle at Fort McHenry in 1814.

13. In 1830 Congress passed the Indian Removal Act. This act allowed for the removal of American Indians who lived east of the Mississippi River to Indian Territory, a newly created region containing most of present-day Oklahoma.

LITERATURE


1. Grimké says it is the goal of most young women to attract the notice and win the attentions of men

2. She says that women need education because they have influence over the minds and character of children of both sexes

3. Grimke believes that a woman who goes out to wash is not paid as much as a man even though the work she is doing is just as hard.

4. She thinks that women should work to support themselves or their families because it would add strength and dignity to women’s characters and teach them more true sympathy
Summary: In today’s lesson we explain Tousaint L’Overture’s role in the Louisiana Purchase and the War of 1812 by researching information .
Homework: Missouri Compromise & Indian Removal Act

Missouri Compromise -Missouri (slave) & Maine (free) entered the Union.

Indian Removal Act - allowed the removal of Indians to Oklahoma. (aka Trail of Tears)


Name __________________________ Class _______________ Date _______________




USHX 3.2 The Nation Expands - Building a Strong Nation

TRUE/FALSE Indicate whether each statement below is true or false by writing T or F in the space provided. If the statement is false, explain why.
______ 1. The case Marbury v. Madison established the principle of judicial review.

______ 2. During their explorations, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark avoided the Shoshoni.

______ 3. The Embargo Act hurt the U.S. economy more than it hurt the British or French economies.

______ 4. Tecumseh worked to form a confederation of Indian nations to oppose settlers.

______ 5. The Treaty of Ghent granted all territory conquered in the War of 1812 to the United States.

______ 6. The Monroe Doctrine warned European nations not to trade with Latin America.

______ 7. The Missouri Compromise maintained the balance of slave and free states in the Union.

______ 8. The Tariff of 1828 prompted Vice President John C. Calhoun to argue that states could nullify federal laws, based on his belief in states’ rights.

______ 9. Congress established the Bureau of Indian Affairs to oversee negotiations with American Indians during the War of 1812.

______10. Osceola encouraged the Seminole to cooperate with removal.


11. In your own words explain how Tousaint L’Overture contributed to and the Louisiana Purchase?
12. What role did Baltimore play in the War of 1812?
13. How Andrew did Jackson react to Indian attacks in the East?
Identify:

Tousaint L’ Overture
Marbury v. Madison
judicial review
Louisiana Purchase
3.2 LITERATURE READING/Encouraging Women’s Rights

Although sisters Sarah and Angelina Grimké were raised in the traditions of the South, they believed that slavery was morally wrong. After moving to the North, they gave public lectures supporting abolition. Both were criticized for “unladylike” behavior, which encouraged them to speak out for women’s

rights. In her letters to Mary S. Parker, president of the Boston Female Antislavery Society, Sarah Grimké focused on the role white women should play in ending slavery. The letters also emphasize the importance of rights for women. As you read the selection, pay attention to Grimké’s description of

women’s goals. Brookline, [Mass.] 1837.
My Dear Sister [Mary S. Parker],—

During the early part of my life, my lot [fate] was cast among the butterflies of the fashionable world; and of this class of women, I am constrained [forced] to say, . . . that their education is miserably deficient [lacking]; that they are taught to regard marriage as the one thing needful, the only avenue to distinction [respect]; hence to attract the notice and win the attentions of men . . . They seldom think that men will be


3.2 LITERATURE READING/Encouraging Women’s Rights…..Continued

allured [attracted] by intellectual acquirements, because they find, that where any mental superiority exists, a woman is generally shunned and regarded as stepping out of her “appropriate sphere,” which, in their view, is to dress, to dance, to set out to the best possible advantage her person. . . . Fashionable women regard themselves, and are regarded by men, as pretty toys. . . .There is another and much more numerous class in this country, who are withdrawn by education or circumstances from the circle of fashionable amusements, but who are brought up with the dangerous and absurd idea, that marriage is a kind of preferment; and that to be able to keep their husband’s house, and render [make] his situation comfortable, is the end [only purpose] of her being. Much that she does and says and thinks is done in reference to this situation. . . . For this purpose more than any other, I verily [truly] believe the majority of girls are trained. . . . In most families, it is considered a matter of far more consequence to call a girl off from making a pie, or a pudding, than to interrupt her whilst engaged in her studies. . . .Let no one think, from these remarks, that I regard a knowledge of housewifery as beneath the acquisition [learning] of women. Far from it: I believe that a complete knowledge of household affairs is an indispensable [completely necessary] requisite [requirement] in a woman’s education. . . . All I complain of is, that our education consists so almost exclusively in culinary [cooking] and other manual operations. . . .

The influence of women over the minds and character of children of both sexes, is allowed to be far greater than that of men. This being the case by the very ordering of nature, women should be prepared by education for the performance of their sacred duties as mothers and as sisters. . . . There is another way in which the general opinion, that women are inferior to men, is manifested [made clear], that bears with tremendous effect on the laboring class, and indeed on almost all who are obliged to earn a subsistence [living], whether it be by mental or physical exertion—I allude [refer] to the disproportionate [very unequal] value set on the time and labor of men and of women. Aman who is engaged in teaching, can always, I believe, command a higher price for tuition than a woman—even when he teaches the same

branches [subjects], and is not in any respect superior to the woman. . . . A woman who goes out to wash, works as hard in proportion as a wood sawyer, or a coal heaver, but she is not generally able to make more than half as much by a day’s work. . . . There is another class of women in this country, to whom I cannot refer, without feelings of the deepest shame and sorrow. I allude to our female slaves. Our Southern cities are whelmed [buried] beneath a tide of pollution; the virtue of female slaves is solely at the mercy of irresponsible tyrants. . . .Can any American woman look at these scenes . . . and fold her hands in apathy [disinterest] and say, “I have nothing to do with slavery”? She cannotand be guiltless.

I cannot close this letter, without saying a few words on the benefits to be derived [experienced] by men, as well as women, from the opinions I advocate [support] relative to the equality of the sexes. Many women are now supported, in idleness and extravagance, by the industry of their husbands, fathers, or brothers, . . . while the wife and daughters and sisters take no part in the support of the family. . . . I believe that if women felt their responsibility, for the support of themselves, or their families it would add strength and dignity to their characters, and teach them more true sympathy. . . .
Thine in the bonds of womanhood,

Sarah M. Grimké


From Sarah Moore Grimké, Letters on the Equality of the Sexes and the Condition of Woman,

Addressed to Mary S. Parker, President of the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society.

UNDERSTANDING WHAT YOU READ

1. What does Grimké say is the goal of most young women in the United States?

2. What reason does Grimké give to support the need for educating women?

3. How does Grimké support her opinion that women are paid unfairly?

4. Why does Grimké feel that women should work to support themselves or their families?

In your own words, summarize today’s lesson.


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