University Requirement



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University RequirementThe University requires that every student complete a two course requirement in Philosophy—first an introductory course (10100, 10101, 20101) and second, a more focused, advanced 2xxxx level course. 

Philosophy majors and minors must take 30101. 30102 or 30313 before registering for 3xxxx or 4xxxx level courses.

Fall 2012 Course Descriptions

Introduction to Philosophy 

10100 01 (12780) 

Kelsey


2:00-2:50 TR (F) 

First Year Students Only 

co-requisite 12100,  Sections 1-14
There are many ways to make a first approach to philosophy; in this course we will begin reading some classic texts on the topic of “knowledge,” and then move to consider other themes as they arise in Plato’s Republic. (Principal authors studied: Plato, Descartes, Wittgenstein.)
Introduction to Philosophy 

10101 01 (11799) 

Gustin


8:30-9:20 MWF

First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy 

10101 02 (11804) 

Hicks, A.

10:40-11:30 MWF 

First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy 

10101 03 (11093) 

Strimple


11:45-12:35 MWF 

First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy 

10101 04 (11079) 

Strimple


12:50-1:40 MWF 

First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy 

10101 05 (10496) 

Sportiello

1:55-2:45 MWF

First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy 

10101 06 (10497) 

Murphy


9:30-10:45 TR 

First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy 

10101 07 (10517) 

Peterson


9:30-10:45 TR 

First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy 

10101 08 (10518) 

Peterson


11:00-12:15 TR 

First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy 

10101 09 (12691) 

Boyce


11:00-12:15 TR

First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy 

10101 10 (12692) 

Boyce


12:30-1:45 TR 

First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy 

10101 11 (13389) 

Segal


12:30-1:45 TR 

First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy 

10101 12 (13398) 

Rafalski


3:30-4:45 TR 

First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy 

10101 13 (14166) 

McCollum


3:30-4:45 TR

First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy 

10101 14 (14338) 

Rafalski


5:00-6:15 TR 

First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy 

10101 15 (14339) 

McCollum


5:00-6:15 TR 

First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy 

10101 16 (14340) 

Hicks, A.

9:35-10:45 MWF 

First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy 

10101 17 (15914)

Baldwin


9:35-10:25 MWF 

First Year Students Only


Introduction to Philosophy 

10101 18 (15915) 

Gamez


12:50-1:40 MWF 

First Year Students Only


Philosophy University Seminar

13185 01 (12202) 

Bays


9:30-10:45 TR 

First Year Students Only


There's an old tradition in Western philosophy which says that people can't *really* be moral (or happy or virtuous or excellent) unless they spend a lot of time thinking, both about morality itself and about certain more purely intellectual subjects (for instance, mathematics and philosophy). The majority of this course will examine some classical---i.e., Greek---developments of this idea. At the end, we'll examine some more-modern responses to it.
Philosophy University Seminar: What Is a Philosophical Problem?

13185 02 (12203)

Joy


11:00-12:15 TR

First Year Students Only


What is a philosophical problem?  How are philosophical problems related to what we study in the social sciences, the natural sciences, and religion?  This introduction to Philosophy focuses on classic strategies for conducting philosophical inquiry, including those of Aristotle, Descartes, Mill, and several 21st-century thinkers.  Readings will cover the history of philosophy as well as recent writings in ethics and the neurosciences.
Requirements:  This University Seminar satisfies the 100-level Philosophy requirement.  Class participation and regular attendance are very important to success in the course.  Classes will consist of both lecture and discussion.  Written work includes four papers and one revised paper.
Philosophy University Seminar: The Philosophy of Socrates

13185 03 (12204 ) 

Karbowski

2:00-3:15 TR 

First Year Students Only


Plato’s early Socratic dialogues are some of the most engaging philosophical works ever written. They can be approached on many different levels and in many different ways, but their charismatic nature makes them an attractive tool for introductory philosophy courses. This course aims to introduce students to philosophical questions and puzzles by a close study of the views and methods of Socrates and his interlocutors in the early Socratic dialogues. We will read the Apology, Euthyphro, Crito, Protagoras, Gorgias, Meno, and Phaedo. The issues examined will include the nature of the best human life, the structure of knowledge, the immortality of the soul, the justifiability of civil disobedience, hedonism, among other things.
Requirements:

There will several writing assignments of various lengths. Please email the instructor for more details about the course assignments.


Required Texts:

Plato: Five Dialogues (Hackett)



Protagoras (Hackett)

Gorgias (Hackett)
Philosophy University Seminar: What Is a Philosophical Problem?

13185 04 (12205)

Joy


2:00-3:15 TR

First Year Students Only


What is a philosophical problem?  How are philosophical problems related to what we study in the social sciences, the natural sciences, and religion?  This introduction to Philosophy focuses on classic strategies for conducting philosophical inquiry, including those of Aristotle, Descartes, Mill, and several 21st-century thinkers.  Readings will cover the history of philosophy as well as recent writings in ethics and the neurosciences.
Requirements:  This University Seminar satisfies the 100-level Philosophy requirement.  Class participation and regular attendance are very important to success in the course.  Classes will consist of both lecture and discussion.  Written work includes four papers and one revised paper.
Philosophy University Seminar

13185 05 (14621) 

DePaul


3:30-4:45 TR 

First Year Students Only


Two things follow from the fact that this is a University Seminar: (1) Classes will have a discussion rather than a lecture format. (2) The course will be writing intensive, with students required to write and rewrite three short papers (5-7 pages).
As an introduction to philosophy, we will use contemporary and historical texts to examine a number of questions that have vexed philosophers from ancient times to the present:
Does God exist?

Why does God allow evil?

Can we know about the world external to our own thoughts and sensations, and if we can, how?

What if anything unifies our selves through time?

Are there any objective moral truths or are all moral claims relative?

What determines whether an action is right or wrong? Is it the consequences of the action, the intentions of the actor, or something else?

What is the good life for a human being?
Honors Philosophy Seminar 

13195 01 (12206) 

Sullivan


9:30-10:45 TR 

First Year Students Only


In this class, students will learn how to construct and critique philosophical arguments.  We will practice this skill while wrestling with two sets of questions that have long fascinated philosophers (and just about everyone...)
(1) Practical and Theoretical Ethics: Under what conditions, if any, is it morally acceptable to kill?  What features must someone or something have to be a target of our moral concern?  Should we always act to promote the greatest good for the greatest number?   Are there objective moral truths?  How can we determine if a moral theory is true?

(2) God, Freedom and Evil:  Does a god exist?  If the God of Judaism, Christianity, or Islam exists, then how do we explain the seemingly gratuitous evils that occur every day?  Are human agents free? If so, what is it precisely to have free will?  Are our futures fixed or open?  Are particular religious or ethical beliefs rationally justifiable? 


Along the way we’ll also learn a good bit of informal logic.  Students will write (and rewrite… and rewrite…) two substantial philosophical papers, give an in-class argument introduction, and actively contribute to class discussions.  More information and a syllabus from a previous class can be found on my teaching site: https://sites.google.com/site/sullivanmeghan/Home/teaching.
Honors Philosophy Seminar 

13195 02 (12207) 

Blanchette

9:30-10:45 TR 

First Year Students Only


This seminar is an introduction to several central issues in philosophy, using both historical and contemporary texts. Topics to be treated will include some subset of these: The nature of human knowledge, the existence of God and the rationality of faith, the nature of the human mind (and its relation to the brain), ethical theory.
Requirements include active seminar participation, a number of short and medium-length writing assignments, quizzes, and exams.
Honors Philosophy Seminar

13195 03 (12208) 

Weithman


12:30-1:45 TR

First Year Students Only


This course is an introduction to philosophy for students in the Honors Program who are seeking to fulfill the first of their university philosophy requirements.  The course is intended to introduce you to philosophical questions, to make you aware of how some of history's greatest philosophers have approached those questions and what they have had to say about them, to help you articulate philosophical concerns of your own and, most importantly, to learn how to address them.  Among the areas of philosophy will explore this semester are ethics, political philosophy, metaphysics and theory of knowledge.  Readings will include selections from the works of Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Locke and Kant.
Honors Philosophy Seminar 

13195 04 (12209) 

Franks


12:30-1:45 TR 

First Year Students Only


A text-based introduction to philosophical thinking. We will read and discuss some writing from antiquity and some writing from the last century. The common feature in everything we read is the invitation to look at things in a different way, to ask new questions (or to stop asking old ones). We will aim both to understand the details of what these texts suggest and to cultivate an ability to re-frame inquiry and make good on this shift in perspective.
You will be evaluated on your contributions to our discussions and on the quality of five short written papers.
Honors Philosophy Seminar 

13195 05 (12397) 

Watson


3:30-4:45 TR 

First Year Students Only


An examination of fundamental questions about the nature of human existence, based on a critical examination of works in the existentialist tradition.
Honors Philosophy Seminar

13195 06 (13396) 

Cross


3:30-4:45 TR 

First Year Students Only


The course introduces some central philosophical concepts and methods by tracing the origins of Ancient Greek thought, beginning with the pre-Socratic philosophers and advancing through the most important philosophers up to the time of Augustine.  In addition to this, the course allows some time to be devoted to close readings of extracts from Thomas Aquinas on topics related to those discussed in the earlier thinkers.  The emphasis will be two-fold: while endeavoring to understand and appreciate the historical milieu within which the questions considered first arose, we will, at the same time, seek to determine for ourselves where we should agree, and where we should disagree, with the theses promulgated.  Among the questions given sharp formulation in our period are: Is morality relative? Or are there moral facts? What does morality have to do, if anything, with religion? Are there defensible reasons for being a theist? Or is theism somehow essentially irrational and indefensible?
Honors Philosophy Seminar

13195 07 (15429) 

Watson


5:00-6:15 TR 

First Year Students Only


This seminar is an introduction to several central issues in philosophy, using both historical and contemporary texts. Topics to be treated will include some subset of these:

The nature of human knowledge, the existence of God and the rationality of faith, the nature of the human mind (and its relation to the brain), ethical theory.


Requirements include active seminar participation, a number of short and medium-length writingassignments, quizzes, and exams.
Introduction to Philosophy 

20101 01 (11635) 

Pence


9:30-10:45 TR
Introduction to Philosophy 

20101 02 (11636) 

Pence


11:00-12:15 TR
Introduction to Philosophy 

20101 03 (11637) 

Fisher, J.

12:30-1:45 TR
Introduction to Philosophy 

20101 04 (11638) 

Fisher, J.

2:00-3:15 TR
Introduction to Philosophy 

20101 05 (11639) 

Hagaman


3:30-4:45 TR
Introduction to Philosophy 

20101 06 (11140) 

Hagaman


5:00-6:15 TR
Introduction to Philosophy 

20101 07 (11640) 

Leach-Krouse

8:30-9:20 MWF
Introduction to Philosophy 

20101 08 (11641) 

Leach-Krouse

9:35-10:25 MWF
Introduction to Philosophy 

20101 09 (12367) 

Baldwin


10:40-11:35 MWF
Introduction to Philosophy 

20101 10 (10479) 

Rodgers  

12:50-1:40 MWF
Philosophy of Human Nature

20201 01 (12181) 

Reimers


8:30 -9:20 MWF
Classically, the question about human nature has been posed in terms of the relation of the soul to the body. However, when we speak in daily life of "human nature" we refer to what we love and hate, what we most want, and how we behave. In this course we will examine the human constitution in relation to emotion, love, desire, and their effects on and implications for human action. In a word, by examining human nature, we explore the meaning of human life.
"Texts will be drawn from the Vatican Council's constitution Gaudium et Spes, Plato's Republic, Thomas Aquinas's Treatise on Happiness, J. S. Mill's Utilitarianism, and Karol Wojtyla's Love and Responsibility.
Course requirements: one term paper, six short quizzes, and a final exam.

Philosophy of Human Nature

20201 02 (12182) 

Reimers


9:35 - 10:25 MWF 
Classically, the question about human nature has been posed in terms of the relation of the soul to the body. However, when we speak in daily life of "human nature" we refer to what we love and hate, what we most want, and how we behave. In this course we will examine the human constitution in relation to emotion, love, desire, and their effects on and implications for human action. In a word, by examining human nature, we explore the meaning of human life.
"Texts will be drawn from the Vatican Council's constitution Gaudium et Spes, Plato's Republic, Thomas Aquinas's Treatise on Happiness, J. S. Mill's Utilitarianism, and Karol Wojtyla's Love and Responsibility.
Course requirements: one term paper, six short quizzes, and a final exam.
Existentialist Themes

20202 01 (18918) 

Ameriks 


11:00-12:15 TR
This course focuses on writings from three main figures: Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Sartre. The contrast of aesthetic, ethical and religious views, as discussed from an existentialist perspective, is the main thematic focus of the course. 

Students are advised to purchase texts in the editions that are on order for the course at the Notre Dame bookstore.


Requirements: The main requirements are two papers, two tests, and a final.
Ancient Wisdom & Modern Love 

20214 01 (14421) 

O'Connor


11:45-12:35 MWF
Built around Plato's Symposium, Shakespeare (including A Midsummer Night's Dream), Catholic writings (including Humanae Vitae), and a few movies, this course explores the nature of romance, erotic love, and friendship. The course generally tries to integrate the analytic approach of philosophy with the imaginative approach of literature.
Requirements: This is a large lecture course and regular attendance is required. Students will write papers totaling about 15 pages, and there will be a final exam.
Ethics

20401 01 (12161) 

Holloway


12:50-1:40 MWF

Crosslist: HESB 30263 01 (19129)


The approach to ethics in this course will be theoretical rather than practical. Instead of focusing on particular moral problems, we will be considering whether or not we can rationally justify a supreme ethical principle or set of ethical principles to guide our actions. After looking at three challenges to this theoretical project, ethical relativism, psychological egoism, and ethical egoism, we will turn to a consideration of two classical types of ethical theory - utilitarianism and Kantianism. Finally, we will end with a look at virtue ethics, a theoretical approach to ethics that calls into question the emphasis on principles that tell us what to do, and instead focuses on the kinds of people we ought to be.
Requirements: Three exams and two papers on an assigned topic.
Ethics

20401 02 (13390) 

Sterba 


1:55-2:45 MWF

Crosslist: HESB 30263 02 (19132)


This course will begin by considering three challenges to a reason-based morality: 1) It’s all relative, 2) It’s better to be an egoist, 3) Morality is determined by religion not reason. Assuming we can overcome these challenges - if we can’t, we will stop the course right here - but if we can, we will then evaluate three traditional moral perspectives: 1) Kantian morality (It is all about doing your duty), 2) Utilitarian morality (It is all about maximizing utility), and 3) Aristotelian morality (It is all about being virtuous) to see if one of them is better than the others. That accomplished, we will then take up three challenges to a traditional conception of morality: 1) the Feminist challenge (Traditional morality is biased against women), 2) the Environmental challenge (Traditional morality is biased against nonhuman living beings), and 3) the Multicultural challenge (Traditional morality is biased against nonWestern cultures). Assuming we think some defensible form of morality survives these challenges (We will take a vote), we will then go on to apply that morality to the solution of a number of problems. You will select which ones from the following: the Distribution of Income and Wealth, Distant Peoples and Future Generations, Abortion and Euthanasia, Human Enhancement, Work and Family Responsibilities, Women’s and Men’s Roles, Affirmative Action, Pornography, Sexual Harassment, Gay and Lesbian Rights, Animal Liberation and Environmental Justice, Punishment and Responsibility, and War, Torture and Terrorism.
Texts:

Introducing Ethics (Pearson, 2012)

Morality in Practice 8th edition (Wadsworth/Cengage, 2011) 
Requirements: Three papers 5-7 pages (1500-2100 words), e-mail comments on all readings, and participation in class discussions.
Ethics

20401 03 (19273) 

Delaney Jr. 

12:30-1:45 TR

Crosslist: HESB 30263 03 (19130)



Overview: This semester we will be reflecting on some ancient and modern texts that offer us some answers and observations concerning how we ought to live. The course might as well be called “A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life”, seeing as the thinkers we will be considering include the person/character of Socrates in the first half of the course, then in the second half of the semester later thinkers who can be broadly classified as Stoics, including Epictetus and the remarkably thoughtful Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius. We will end the course with a reading of Friedrich Nietzsche’s provocative attempt at an intellectual autobiography Ecce Homo (“Behold the Man!”). Nietzsche will prove relevant to our structured journey through Socrates and the Stoics that Socrates influenced insofar as Nietzsche took himself to be (or have created) a kind of “artistic Socrates”, and as such indicates/advocates a way one might live and attitude towards living that has been highly influential amongst writers and artists since the late 19th century. I emphasize that this is a modern ethics class that revolves around some “mulling” of provocative texts in the ancient and modern Western intellectual tradition; it is emphatically not a course in the history of philosophy. All texts are being read in the best English translations.

Course Requirements: Two (2) 10 page papers, one due at mid-term break and one due at the end of the semester. There will also be a short take-home Final Examination which will be due at the end of the examination period (of course it can be turned in early for travel planning purposes).

Required Texts: There are 6 texts, all of which are available at the ND Bookstore. These include:

  • Plato, The Last Days of Socrates.

  • Ahbel-Rappe and Kamtekar, A Companion to Socrates.

  • Epictetus, The Handbook (The Encheiridion)

  • Long, Epictetus: A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life.

  • Marcus Aurelius, The Emperor’s Handbook.

  • Friedrich Nietzsche, Ecce Homo.

In addition to these texts I will be distributing handouts throughout the course. These too are required reading.

Office Hours: Very liberally by appointment. I hold my office hours at Legends and can usually meet with you anytime between 11-3 on MWF.


Ethics

20401 04 (19274) 

Delaney Jr. 

3:30-4:45 TR

Crosslist: HESB 30263 04 (19131)


Overview: This semester we will be reflecting on some ancient and modern texts that offer us some answers and observations concerning how we ought to live. The course might as well be called “A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life”, seeing as the thinkers we will be considering include the person/character of Socrates in the first half of the course, then in the second half of the semester later thinkers who can be broadly classified as Stoics, including Epictetus and the remarkably thoughtful Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius. We will end the course with a reading of Friedrich Nietzsche’s provocative attempt at an intellectual autobiography Ecce Homo (“Behold the Man!”). Nietzsche will prove relevant to our structured journey through Socrates and the Stoics that Socrates influenced insofar as Nietzsche took himself to be (or have created) a kind of “artistic Socrates”, and as such indicates/advocates a way one might live and attitude towards living that has been highly influential amongst writers and artists since the late 19th century. I emphasize that this is a modern ethics class that revolves around some “mulling” of provocative texts in the ancient and modern Western intellectual tradition; it is emphatically not a course in the history of philosophy. All texts are being read in the best English translations.

Course Requirements: Two (2) 10 page papers, one due at mid-term break and one due at the end of the semester. There will also be a short take-home Final Examination which will be due at the end of the examination period (of course it can be turned in early for travel planning purposes).

Required Texts: There are 6 texts, all of which are available at the ND Bookstore. These include:

  • Plato, The Last Days of Socrates.

  • Ahbel-Rappe and Kamtekar, A Companion to Socrates.

  • Epictetus, The Handbook (The Encheiridion)

  • Long, Epictetus: A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life.

  • Marcus Aurelius, The Emperor’s Handbook.

  • Friedrich Nietzsche, Ecce Homo.

In addition to these texts I will be distributing handouts throughout the course. These too are required reading.

Office Hours: Very liberally by appointment. I hold my office hours at Legends and can usually meet with you anytime between 11-3 on MWF.
Ethics: Theories, Concepts, and Applications

20401 05 (19752) 

Pilkington 

8:00-9:15 MW
The aim of this second level philosophy course is to explore important work in moral philosophy in a manner which introduces students to different aspects of the discipline. In the first part of the course we will focus on the three most prominent ethical traditions: Virtue Theory, Utilitarianism, and Deontology. With this theoretical background in hand, we will move to a more focused study of one prominent concept in moral philosophy, dignity. We will close the course by studying applications of this concept in moral philosophy and the related fields of bioethics and political philosophy.

Ethics: Theories, Concepts, and Applications

20401 06 (19753) 

Pilkington 

9:30-10:45 MW
The aim of this second level philosophy course is to explore important work in moral philosophy in a manner which introduces students to different aspects of the discipline. In the first part of the course we will focus on the three most prominent ethical traditions: Virtue Theory, Utilitarianism, and Deontology. With this theoretical background in hand, we will move to a more focused study of one prominent concept in moral philosophy, dignity. We will close the course by studying applications of this concept in moral philosophy and the related fields of bioethics and political philosophy.
Philosophy of Law

20411 01 (18919) 

Warfield 

1:55-2:45 MW (F)

co-requisite: PHIL 22411


We will examine philosophical issues arising in discussion of both substantive and procedural criminal law. After an early survey of a large range of topics, we will spend larger blocks of time on two main topics:

1. the debate over the justification of laws against some kinds of drug possession and/or use.

2. an exploration of the extent to which rules of criminal procedure and evidence do or do not match up well with the set of rules that would best serve the purpose of discovering the truth about an alleged criminal act.
This course includes a mandatory Friday discussion section. Students will write short to medium length papers and take in class exams. 
Are We Eating Good Food?

20429 01  (19734) 

Hicks, Dan

9:30-10:45 MW
In the last few years, an increasing number of voices have answered the title question for this course with a resounding "no." In this course, we will develop conceptual tools from ethics, political philosophy, and philosophy of science to critically engage with both proponents and critics of several aspects of our contemporary food system. Possible topics will be picked based on student interest, and include but are not limited to vegetarianism, conventional vs. organic agriculture, genetic engineering, justice for food workers, scientific and public policy controversies over nutrition and health, food deserts, and agricultural economics. We will also be working on a service project with a local food-related organization in order to understand how these issues appear in and influence the food system of the Michiana region.  Graded assignments include four short papers, two longer papers, a final research paper, and significant class participation. 
History of Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art 1

20430 01 (19466) 

Rush 


11:00-12:15 TR

Crosslist: PHIL 43325 01 (19467) 


Course description: a conceptual-historical survey of aesthetic theory and the philosophy of art that beginning in antiquity and concluding in the Renaissance.  The main readings will be historical sources in both philosophy and art theory more broadly construed, with ample attention to various types and genres of art and in-depth consideration of several individual works.  Topics discussed: the relation of art to truth the nature of artistic representation, tragedy and comedy, natural and artistic beauty, ethics and art, genius and sublimity, social roles of art and of the aesthetic response to nature, etc. 
Requirements: This course is designed to both fulfill the second philosophy course requirement for general education and as a stand-alone majors’ course.  Writing requirements will differ, depending on which version of the course one opts for. 
Please note: this is the first of a two-semester series of lectures. The second part covers aesthetics and philosophy of art from the Reformation, through modernism, up to the most contemporary materials.  Neither part is a prerequisite for the other; they may be taken individually, both serially, or both but out of order.
Medical Ethics 

20602 01 (12147) 

Solomon


10:40-11:30 MW (F)

Crosslist: CEST 20602 01 (14403), HESB 30237 01 (13934), STV 20245 01 (13223)

co-requisite 22602
An exploration, from the point of view of ethical theory, of a number of ethical problems in contemporary biomedicine. Topics to be taken up will include: 1) euthanasia, 2) abortion, 3) the allocation of scarce medical resources, 4) truth telling in the doctor - patient relationship, 5) the right to medical care, and 6) informed consent and human experimentation. No previous work in philosophy will be presupposed.
Requirements: Two short (4-6 pp.) problem papers, a mid-term, and a final exam.

Texts: Munson, Intervention and Reflection: Basic Issues in Medical Ethics.


Science, Technology, and Society

20606 01 (13228) 

Hamlin


12:50-1:40 MW (F) 

co-requisite: STV 22556 

Crosslist: STV 20556 (12143), HESB 30246 (14405)
Please Note: Students in 20556 must also register for a section of STV 22556 – Science, Technology and Society Discussion
This course introduces the interdisciplinary field of science and technology studies. Our concern will be with science and technology (including medicine) as social and historical, i.e., as human, phenomena. We shall examine the divergent roots of contemporary science and technology, and the similarities and (sometimes surprising) differences in their methods and goals. The central theme of the course will be the ways in which science and technology interact with other aspects of society, including the effects of technical and theoretical innovation in bringing about social change, and the social shaping of science and technology themselves by cultural, economic and political forces. Because science/society interactions so frequently lead to public controversy and conflict, we shall also explore what resources are available to mediate such conflicts in an avowedly democratic society.
Philosophy and Cosmology: A Revolution

20612 01 (18920) 

Brading 


11:45-1:00 MW 

Crosslist: STV 20431 01 (18736)


In the seventeenth century there was a revolution in our view of the cosmos and of our own place in it. This course is about that revolution. Most vivid, perhaps, was the change from believing that the Earth is at the center of everything, with the Sun and the stars revolving around it, to believing that the Earth is just one planet among many, orbiting around the Sun. How and why did these changes take place? The main philosophical themes running through this course are: (1) the nature of matter and of all the material bodies in the cosmos, with the focus of attention on how and why these bodies move as they do (including Newton's laws of motion and of universal gravitation), and (2) what constitutes knowledge of, and how we justify our beliefs about, the cosmos (including the story of Galileo's condemnation by the Church). We will explore these and other questions, reading as we go along from the work of some of the main people involved, including Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Descartes and Newton. The class will combine lectures with discussion, encouraging everyone to participate. Examination will be through a combination of assignments and exams. 
Philosophy & Science Fiction

20620 01 (18921) 

Rea 


8:00-9:15 MW

Crosslist: STV 20125 01 (18735)


The science fiction genre is rich with stories that explore classic philosophical questions, exploit timeless philosophical puzzles and paradoxes, or thematically engage large-scale philosophical movements and worldviews. In this class, we will examine the way in which several core problems of philosophy are raised in contemporary works of science fiction, and we will look carefully at more systematic discussions of those problems by well-known figures in the history of philosophy. We will discuss, among other things, the possibility and limits of human knowledge, the nature of time, paradoxes of time travel, the possibility of free human action, and some widely discussed puzzles about identity and persistence over time.  We will also discuss two 20th Century philosophical “movements”: existentialism and postmodernism.
Course Requirements: Probably two exams, three or four short papers (4 pages max), and class participation. 
Texts: A course packet and four films to be watched outside of class.  SF readings will include authors such as Philip K. Dick, Robert Heinlein, Cordwainer Smith, Roger Zelazny, Ted Chiang, and Greg Egan.

Philosophy of Religion

20801 01 (15924) 

Iwanicki


5:00-6:15 TR 

Crosslist: HESB 30233 01 (19127)


This course is designed as a topics-based introduction to philosophy of religion. We will consider such topics as the problem of evil, human freedom and divine foreknowledge, religious experience, religious pluralism, and evolutionary argument against naturalism.
All readings will be available on Concourse.
Requirements: 3 exams, 2 papers, 1 group presentation.
Philosophical Reflections on Christian Belief

20802 01 (16992) 

Potter


3:30-4:45 TR
There are two main aims of the course. First, we’ll do a philosophical survey of some of the important elements of the Christian faith - the topics treated will include arguments for God’s existence, the problem of evil, the atonement, hell, as well as more practical elements like prayer, Scripture, and forgiveness. Second, we’ll gain a more systematic understanding of C.S. Lewis’ life and thought. While we won’t confine ourselves to material Lewis has written (we’ll draw from contemporary philosophical literature on each of these topics), we’ll approach all of these topics through his work.
Requirements: Two exams and a term paper.
Thought of Aquinas

20805 01 (18923) 

O'Callaghan

9:35-10:25 MWF

Crosslist: MI 20348 01 (19233)


Thought of Aquinas:  This course provides an overview of certain central teachings of St. Thomas Aquinas with attention particularly to philosophical topics touching upon theological questions.  1) Faith and reason and the ways to God; 2) Human nature, particularly soul, body, and the image of God; 3) Law and Virtue; 4) Nature and Grace.

Special Topics: Philosophical Issues 

26999 01 (10132) 

Holloway


*** Unless otherwise indicated, you must have taken or be taking 30301 or 30302 or 30313 to register for 3xxxx and 4xxxx level courses in philosophy. To declare a major or minor, sign up to meet with Professor Speaks in 100 Malloy Hall.
Ancient & Medieval Philosophy 

30301 01 (12098) 

Dumont


3:30-4:45 TR

Crosslist: MI 30301 01 (13227) 



Open to phil, mphi, or PHTH majors. New and non majors need permission from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
A survey of Western philosophy from its beginnings in the early Greek physicists to the late middle ages. The emphasis in class will be on the reading and analysis of fundamental texts by main figures of the period: Parmenides, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Anselm, Bonaventure, and Thomas Aquinas. Concurrent reading of a standard history will supply additional background and continuity.
Requirements: Two papers (one each for the ancient and medieval portions of the course), a mid-term, and final examination.
Ancient & Medieval Philosophy 

30301 02 (15938) 

Freddoso 

1:30-2:45 MW

Crosslist: MI 30301 02 (15939) 



Open to phil, mphi, or PHTH majors. New and non majors need permission from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
An introductory survey of western philosophy from the 6th-century B.C. Presocratics to the 16th-century Scholastics. The lectures will focus primarily on Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, and St. Thomas Aquinas, using the twin themes of nature and human nature as an occasion for (a) formulating with some precision the main metaphysical and ethical problematics that emerge from the works of Plato and Aristotle, (b) investigating the influence of Plato and Aristotle on the Catholic intellectual tradition, and (c) exploring in some depth the relation between faith and reason as articulated by the medievals.
Because the lectures will not try to cover all the important figures (though there will be ample references to them, as well as to key early modern philosophers), the students will be required to read all of the assigned secondary source, viz., James Jordan's Western Philosophy: From Antiquity to the Middle Ages, as well as the primary sources assigned for the lectures. In addition, the requirements include (a) two 6-7 page papers on assigned topics, and (b) two exams.
This course is meant primarily to introduce philosophy majors to important figures and issues in the history of philosophy, and so the course will be taught at a higher level of sophistication than ordinary second courses in philosophy. As long as they understand this, however, non-philosophy majors, as well as the undecided, are welcome.
History of Modern Philosophy 

30302 01 (11414) 

Newlands


11:45-1:00 MW
The sweeping scientific revolution of the 17th and 18th centuries paralleled the development of sweeping new approaches to philosophy. Of particular concern to these so-called “modern philosophers” was to understand the relationship between human beings and the natural world, especially in the light of the emerging new scientific picture. In this course, we will explore many facets of this relationship: the relationship between the mind and the body; the nature, role and knowledge of God; skepticism and knowledge of the external world; the possibility of human freedom; the possibility of miracles; causation; and the nature of the fundamentally real. As we will see along the way, many of the new methods, problems and proposed solutions surrounding these topics are the very methods, problems, and solutions still driving contemporary philosophy.
Readings will be drawn mainly from Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.
Textbook: Modern Philosophy: An Anthology of Primary Sources, eds. Ariew and Watkins, Hackett Publishing
Requirements: 2 papers, 2 exams, occasional short writing exercises

19th and 20th Century Philosophy 

30303  01 (15943) 

Ameriks


2:00-3:15 TR
A history of philosophical reactions to Kant, from Fichte to positivism. The focus will be on a) Hegel, b) Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche, and c) on the empiricist tradition surrounding Mill. Emphasis will be on the 19th century.
Texts: Nineteenth Century Philosophy, ed. P. Gardiner; and The Essential Hegel,ed. F. Weiss.
Requirements: The main requirements are two papers, two tests, and a final.
Aristotle on Human Nature

43109 01 (18932)

Karbowski

12:30-1:45 TR 
The aim of this course will be to develop a nuanced understanding of Aristotle's conception of human nature. To this end, we will examine his natural philosophy, metaphysics, and biology as well as his ethical and political thought. In addition, we will read some important secondary literature on the subject. Students will be expected to give regular short presentations and write a few term papers.
The Philosophy of Augustine

43161 01 (19483) 

Gersh


12:30-1:45 TR

Cross List: PHIL 83261 01 (19484), MI 40330 01 (19246), MI 60330 01 (19255)


The course is intended as an introduction to Augustine's work from the philosophical viewpoint, although necessarily certain theological questions will also be examined. The emphasis will fall partly on the reading of selected texts (in English translation) beginning with dialogues of Cassiciacum such as Against the Academics, On Order, Soliloquies, On the Teacher, continuing with On the Quantity of the Soul, On Music, On the Immortality of the Soul, On Free Choice of the Will, and concluding with The City of God.  The course will also identify certain philosophical themes as particularly worthy of discussion, including Augustine's ideas about the nature of God, his theories of knowledge and language, and his notions of the relations between good and evil, providence and free will. Requirement: one final paper (ca. 20 pp.) and an oral book report.
Environmental Justice

43308 01 (18933) 

Shrader-Frechette 

3:30-6:00 M

Crosslist: BIOS 50544 01 (19399), HESB 43537 01 (19146), IIPS 50901 01 (19443), PHIL 63308 01 (19276), STV 43396 01 (19323) 


“Environmental injustice” (EIJ) refers to the fact that children, minorities, and poor people receive higher exposures to environmental toxins that damage their health and kill them. This course is designed to understand and to address EIJ, and it is for people interested in environmental problems and the resulting social injustices that they cause. It will cover flaws in scientific method and in ethics that cause EIJ. Course is hands-on, practical, and dedicated to showing students how to do environment-related social-justice analysis and how to analyze environmental-impact assessments. Students choose individual projects on which to work, and these projects determine most of the course grade. These projects also are designed to help influence environmental policy or to serve the needs of pollution-threatened poor or minority communities. For more information, see the syllabus at www.nd.edu/~kshrader/courses/
Course Prerequisites: Students should have instructor’s permission (via email to kshrader@nd.edu) to register for course.
Course Requirements: There are weekly quizzes; but no tests and no exams, 2 short, analytic papers; participation in classroom analysis, and one student-chosen project. Students each choose an EJ project on which to work, so that they can use techniques (learned in the course) to promote real-world social justice and improved use of scientific methods in specific poor or minority communities who are victimized by pollution. There are no exams.
Course Texts include Peter Singer, One World; Shrader-Frechette, Environmental Justice; and a variety of articles from scientific and medical journals.

History of Aesthetics & Philosophy of Art 1: : The ancient, medieval, and renaissance contexts

43325 01 (19487) 

Rush


11:00-12:15 TR

Crosslist: PHIL 20430 01 (19466)


Course description: a conceptual-historical survey of aesthetic theory and the philosophy of art that beginning in antiquity and concluding in the Renaissance.  The main readings will be historical sources in both philosophy and art theory more broadly construed, with ample attention to various types and genres of art and in-depth consideration of several individual works.  Topics discussed: the relation of art to truth the nature of artistic representation, tragedy and comedy, natural and artistic beauty, ethics and art, genius and sublimity, social roles of art and of the aesthetic response to nature, etc. 
Requirements: This course is designed to both fulfill the second philosophy course requirement for general education and as a stand-alone majors’ course.  Writing requirements will differ, depending on which version of the course one opts for. 
Please note: this is the first of a two-semester series of lectures. The second part covers aesthetics and philosophy of art from the Reformation, through modernism, up to the most contemporary materials.  Neither part is a prerequisite for the other; they may be taken individually, both serially, or both but out of order.
Justice Seminar

43404 01 (12172)

Weithman/Roos

1:30-2:45 MW

Crosslist: POLS 43640 01 (12170), ECON 33250 01 (12171) 


The Justice Seminar undertakes a critical examination of major theories of justice, using both contemporary works (e.g., John Rawls' A Theory of Justice and Kenneth Arrow's seminal papers on voting theory) and historical classics (e.g., Aristotle's Politics and the Lincoln & Douglas debates). The seminar requires substantial participation of students both in the form of seminar papers and in oral discussion. This is the core course for the minor in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (P.P.E.).
Metaphysics

43501 01 (12320)

van Inwagen

5:00-6:15 TR
Metaphysics is the part of philosophy that attempts to get behind all appearances and to arrive at reasoned judgments about how things really are. Metaphysics asks what the most general features of the world are, why there is a world that has those features, and how we human beings fit into that world. Some metaphysical questions that will be investigated are: Is the apparent existence of a multitude of things a real feature of the world, or is reality somehow "one" and individuality an illusion? Is there a real physical world outside the mind? Is there a mind-independent truth? Why is there a world: Why does anything at all exist? Is the physical world the work of an intelligent designer? How are our thoughts and feelings related to our bodies? Have we free will?
Texts: Peter van Inwagen and Dean Zimmerman (eds.), Metaphysics:The Big Questions; Peter van Inwagen, Metaphysics
Written work: An hour examination and a term paper. There will be no final examination.
Philosophy of Action

43503 01 (18934)

Warfield 

11:45-1:00 MW
We will spend roughly two thirds of the semester on issues concerning freedom of the will, along with perhaps some helpful background material on general issues in philosophy of action. The remainder of the course will focus on the topic of "weakness of will".
Students will write significant papers, lead class discussion for one day, and participate in other class exercises. This course will not have exams.
Bio-Medical Ethics, Scientific Evidence & Public Health Risk 

43708 01 (12992)

Shrader-Frechette

3:30-6:00 T 

Crosslist: BIOS 50545 (13255), GH 50545 (17047), HESB 43548 (13935), PHIL 63708 (14630), STV 40216 (13229)


This course is designed for those interested in social-justice, medical, and health problems, especially premedical students and those studying the environment, science, and engineering. It will survey ethical and scientific issues associated with current public-health problems such as pollution-induced cancers, occupational injury and death, threats to children’s health, and inadequate emphasis on disease prevention, nutrition, and environmental health. For more information, see the syllabus at www.nd.edu/~kshrader/courses/
Course requirements: Weekly quizzes but no tests and no exams, 3 short papers, readings for every class, participation in classroom analysis.
Course prerequisites: Instructor’s permission required (obtained via email to kshrader@nd.edu).
Aquinas On God

43806 01 (18936) 

Freddoso 

3:00-4:15 MW

Crosslist: MI43340 (19250)


A close reading of the first 43 questions of the first book of the Summa Theologiae in a new and dazzling (well .... at least adequate) translation by the instructor.  These questions, which deal both with the divine nature or essence and with the three divine persons, provide as comprehensive a survey of St. Thomas's metaphysics, philosophy of language, and philosophical psychology as one could hope for, along with lots of enticing tidbits about logic (including modal logic), space and time, causality, numbers, and a whole host of minor topics that figure in the Christian understanding of God.  But, more importantly, they exhibit how St. Thomas uses an impressive array of philosophical and theological tools in fashioning a central element of the Christian claim to wisdom.
Requirements:  Three 6-7 page papers and a daily question on the text for the day
Prerequisites:  You really should have taken Phil 30301 for this course.  If you have not had Phil 30301, please contact me before you register for the course.
On Evils

43815 01 (18937) 

O'Callaghan 

9:30-10:45 TR
Does evil exist?  If it exists, what is it?  If it exists, is suffering an example of evil?  If it exists, does its existence pose an insuperable problem for Christian belief in God?  Is there an adequate philosophical approach to understanding evil, or are all such approaches bound to fail?  These and other questions often fall under what is called the "problem of evil."  This course seeks to better understand what that problem might be, and what might be said about it in the context of orthodox Christian belief, primarily from a philosophical perspective, but also at points theological.
Intermediate Logic 

43907 01 (14827) 

Blanchette

2:00-3:15 TR

Crosslist: PHIL 83901 01 (11092)


This course is an introduction to the metatheory of first-order logic. We begin with some basic set theory, and move on to the fundamentals of first-order metatheory, including the completeness, compactness, and Löwenheim-Skolem theorems. There will be frequent homework and one or more exams. Though no particular logical background is presupposed, this course is naturally taken after Phil 30313 or equivalent. 
Topics in Philosophical Logic: Set Theory

43908 01 (18938) 

Bays


11:00-12:15 TR

Crosslist: PHIL 93903 01 (18946)


This course will focus on the foundations of set theory.  The first part of the course will be mostly technical.  We'll cover the ZFC axioms, large cardinals, the idea of forcing, etc.  The second part will involve philosophical issues arising from set theory.
All students will be expected to do problem sets and to write 1-2 short essays.  At the end of the term, students can choose between a take-home (technical) final exam or a term paper.
Between Math and Philosophy

43912 01 (18939)

Detlefsen

3:30-4:45 TR

  

Between Mathematics and Philosophy. The aim of the course is to introduce the student to some of the many important interactions between mathematics and philosophy throughout their histories. After a look at some ancient and medieval cases, we’ll turn our attention to the modern era and the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Particular attention will be given to the use of so-called "imaginary" or "ideal" elements and methods in mathematics (e.g. infinitesimals and imaginary and complex numbers in algebra and analysis, points at infinity, etc. in geometry) and their justification.



Assignments will include one or perhaps two class presentations and two written projects. Grading will reflect performance on these and also participation in class discussions.
Natural Language Semantics

43916 01 (19502)

Speaks


1:30-2:45 MW
One of the most remarkable facts about natural languages, like English, is that speakers of the language are able to understand sentences which they have never before encountered. Many have thought that this fact is best explained by the fact that the meanings of sentences are determined by the meanings of the expressions of which they are composed, along with the way in which those expressions are combined. To a first approximation, the project of constructing a compositional semantic theory for a natural language is the project of explaining how the meanings of sentences of that language are determined by the meanings of sub-sententential expressions, plus the way in which those expressions are combined to form the sentence. The task of constructing such a theory has been a central focus of linguistics and the philosophy of language. This course will be an introduction to natural language semantics.
Directed Readings 

46497 01 (11830) 

Holloway
Directed Readings 



46497 02 (10097) 

Holloway
Senior Thesis



48499 01 (11034) 

Speaks


* The 3xxxx and 4xxxx level courses are typically for majors only and carry the major core courses as prerequisites. They are more difficult than 20000 level courses which should be used for completing university requirements. If you are a non-major interested in taking one of these courses, you must sign up for an appointment with Professor Speaks, the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Signup sheets will be posted in the hallway outside 100 Malloy Hall a few weeks before registration begins.


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