University of illinois at urbana-champaign general education board



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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN

GENERAL EDUCATION BOARD

Certification Procedures
A course proposed for General Education credit goes through the following certification process:
1. Initiation. Courses proposed for General Education are sent by the department to the college for approval. The college then sends the course proposal, complete with cover sheet, to the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost (OVCAAP).
2. Transmittal. OVCAAP assigns the proposal to a subset of committee members for initial review. Upon completion of the review, the course is presented to the full Board for consideration.
3. Approvals. Once approved by the full Board, the OVCAAP issues an implementation letter notifying the college of the newly-approved course; the department head, and the chair of the General Education Board are copied on this letter.
4. Requests for Revision. Occasionally, the committee may require additional information or clarification pertaining to a course under review. The OVCAAP will contact the college and department with the inquiry and present the response to the full Board for further consideration.
5. Approved Course Lists. OVCAAP maintains cumulative lists of courses certified for General Education credit in the Course Explorer.GENERAL EDUCATION PROPOSAL CHECKLIST

Complete course information section (Section A)


Select General Education category or categories (Section B)
Include Attachments (Section C)
New Course Outline

Syllabus including complete outline of topics, texts and readings, and assignments


Review Part I (Guidelines for All General Education Courses) and Part VIII (Perspectives on Women and Gender) of the Guidelines for General Education Courses.
Address the General Information Questions (Section D)
Address the Category-specific Questions (Section E)
Include the College Approval and cover sheet
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN

GENERAL EDUCATION BOARD
Proposal for General Education Certification
A. Course Information:
Department: Banner Subject/Number:
Course Title:
Credit Hours: _____ Cross-listings:

Existing Course, No Revision New Course Revised Course

Weekly Hours: Lecture: _____ Disc: _____ Lab: _____ Other (specify): _____

Anticipated Semester Enrollment: _____ Section Sizes: Lecture: _____ Disc: _____ Lab: _____ Other: _____


B. General Education Category: Check the category or categories for which certification is proposed. A course may be proposed for only one category, with the exception of those categories marked with an asterisk (*). See the Guidelines for General Education Courses, Part I, Section 1.8. However, courses approved for Advanced Composition, Cultural Studies and Quantitative Reasoning II may be certified for simultaneous certification in a distribution area (i.e., Natural Sciences & Technology, Humanities & the Arts, or Social & Behavioral Sciences).


English Composition I

Advanced Composition (formerly English Composition II)*


Quantitative Reasoning I

Quantitative Reasoning II*


Cultural Studies

Western/Comparative Culture(s)*

Non-Western Culture(s)*

U.S. Minority Culture(s)*


Natural Science & Technology

Physical Sciences

Life Sciences
Humanities & Arts

Literature and the Arts

Historical and Philosophical Perspectives
Social & Behavioral Science

Social Science



Behavioral Science


C. Attachments: For new courses, attach the proposed official University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign New Course Outline and a current syllabus for this course. The syllabus should include a complete outline of topics, texts and readings, and assignments.
D. General Information: For all proposals for certification, please attach a statement responding to the following (in numbered order):
1. Is the course required for a major concentration? If so, which ones (program or department)?
2. Is this course part of a sequence? If so, identify the other courses in the sequence, and indicate whether this course is complete in itself for students who may not take the entire sequence.
3. What is the frequency with which the course will be offered (e.g., every semester, once a year)? Approval of this certification means that the proposing department is committed to offering the course on a continuing and regular basis for a minimum of three years after approval.
4. Briefly describe how the course fulfills these overall objectives of general education, including racial and gender diversity.
Courses approved for general education are expected to provide substantive, rigorous, and broad introductions to important theories, concepts, and methodologies in a particular field of study that are appropriate for non majors; to broaden students' understanding of human thought and achievement; and to enhance critical and analytical thinking. The General Education Board asks that departments carefully review the availability of relevant scholarship on women and gender issues to assure that these materials are integrated into the courses where that is appropriate.
5. Describe the instructional format and provide special justification as necessary.
Departments are responsible for developing appropriate instructional formats for courses proposed for general education. The course format should not only be appropriate to the discipline and course content, but also should be consistent with the aims of general education. In most instances the goals of general education as set forth in the campus guidelines will not be met by instruction in mass lectures without discussion or laboratory sections.
6. Courses approved for general education are expected to have as an integral part of their design means that promote the development of students' communication skills relevant to the area, its data, and methods. Briefly describe the means (e.g., written exams, papers, oral reports, projects) that address this goal.
7. Indicate those who will teach the course and describe carefully the procedures for training and supervising teaching assistants.
All general education courses should be taught by faculty or under the direct responsibility of a staff member at least at the rank of assistant professor and, where teaching assistants are utilized, appropriate means for preparing, supervising, and providing guidance to teaching assistants should be provided.
8. Briefly describe how evaluation and adherence to general education guidelines will be monitored. Please indicate the timeline for such evaluations.
Departments offering courses for general education credit are responsible for assuring that the courses are taught in line with the guidelines for general education courses and that the courses and instruction are regularly evaluated by discipline-appropriate methods.


E. Category-specific Information: Please review the Guidelines for General Education Courses and respond to the questions corresponding to the General Education category or categories for which this course is proposed. Indicate succinctly (2-3 pages maximum) how the course is designed to meet the guidelines for the specific area (or areas) of general education for which it is proposed.
English Composition I
1. Show that the course has instruction in writing as its primary emphasis, includes a full semester (or equivalent) of weekly writing assignments, and includes primarily multi-draft writing assignments. What provision does the course make for careful evaluation of writing assignments?
2. What strategies does the course use to emphasize critical thinking and to strengthen development of students' ideas, clarity of expression, and organization along with their basic writing skills?
Advanced Composition (formerly English Composition II)
1. Into which of the following categories does this course fall? (a) Rhetoric or communication course building on Composition I, (b) a General Education course in another area having a substantial writing component, (c) a required or elective course in a major or minor field of study (explain).
2. How does this course use writing assignments to facilitate analysis and synthesis of the subject matter of the course, or in the case of writing courses in the rhetoric and communication disciplines, application of the principles under study?
3. What strategies does the course use to require substantial original composition over the course of the semester, including directed rewriting following careful evaluation?
4. Show that the course is taught in section sizes consistent with the goals of students' receiving thoughtful appraisal of their writing and a substantial portion of the course grade being based upon evaluation of written work.
Quantitative Reasoning I
Respond to the appropriate section below.
If the course is a mathematics course:
1. Show that the course is a either a calculus course, or a mathematics course for which calculus is a prerequisite, or a college-level mathematics course emphasizing logical thought processes as opposed to memorization or manipulation of mathematical formulas.
2. How does the course teach clear organization and exposition of mathematical thought?
If the course is a computer science course:
1. Show that the course involves problem formulation, algorithm development, and a significant amount of coding of programs.
2. What field of computer applications is addressed in the course?
If the course is a probability or statistics course:
1. How does the course emphasize the relationships between the assumptions of the probabilistic and statistical models discussed and the conclusions drawn?
2. What strategy is employed to assure that students will understand when particular models are appropriate or inappropriate?
If the course is a course in symbolic logic:
1. How does the course emphasize the algebra of symbolic and scientific reasoning, and introduce the techniques of formal logics, including truth-fundamental logic and quantification theory, methods for the valuation of scientific evidence, and the use of scientific information in decision making?
2. How does the course teach the student the translation of verbal arguments into their symbolic counterparts, the manipulation of symbols, and the translation of word problems into their symbolic representations?
Quantitative Reasoning II
The Quantitative Reasoning II requirement can be met by completing: (1) a second course approved for Quantitative Reasoning I credit; (2) a course in mathematics, statistics, computer science or symbolic logic that builds upon and expands a prerequisite course taken to meet the Quantitative Reasoning I requirement; or (3) a course in any department at the 100, 200 or 300-level in which at least 25 percent of the course material and graded material require the use of mathematics, computer science, probability and statistics, or symbolic logic consistent with Quantitative Reasoning I guidelines. Only courses in category (3) must be submitted for Quantitative Reasoning II approval and must adhere to the guidelines below.
If the course incorporates mathematics:
If the course incorporates mathematics show how at least 25 percent of the course content and graded material incorporates either calculus, or mathematics for which calculus is a prerequisite, or college-level mathematics emphasizing logical thought processes as opposed to memorization or manipulation of mathematical formulas.
If the course incorporates computer science:
Show how at least 25 percent of the course content and graded material incorporates problem formulation, algorithm development, and a significant amount of coding of programs.
If the course incorporates probability or statistics:
Show how at least 25 percent of the course content and graded material incorporates the relationships between the assumptions of the probabilistic and statistical models discussed and the conclusions drawn?

If the course incorporates symbolic logic:
Show how at least 25 percent of the course content and graded material incorporates the algebra of symbolic and scientific reasoning, and introduce the techniques of formal logics, including truth-fundamental logic and quantification theory, methods for the valuation of scientific evidence, and the use of scientific information in decision making?
Language Other than English
Since the Language Other than English requirement is based on completion of a third or fourth semester language course, language courses do not need to be submitted for General Education approval. Any course that is considered the third or fourth level of a language will satisfy the requirement.
Natural Sciences and Technology
Respond to the appropriate section below.
If the course is in the physical sciences:
1. Show that the course presents the fundamentals of the science, or has as a prerequisite a college course in the fundamentals of the science.
2. Show that the course emphasizes the scientific method, including making observations, evaluating data, and solving problems.
If the course is in the life sciences:


1. Show that the course presents fundamentals of the life sciences, or has as a prerequisite a college course in fundamentals of the life sciences.,
2. Show that the course emphasizes the scientific method, including making

observations, evaluating data, and solving problems.
Humanities and the Arts


1. Describe the reading requirements in this course.
2. Describe the writing requirements in this course.
3. How does the course introduce students to the typical critical approaches and methods of the discipline, and to past accomplishments in the field?
4. How does the course foster the goals of humanistic study, including:  skill in communication; discriminating judgment and appreciation of ideas; understanding of cultural traditions; awareness of cultural ethnic and national diversity; and reflection on the human condition?


5. If the course contains elements of more than one category within the Humanities and the Arts (literature, the arts, historical perspectives, or philosophical perspectives), explain why this course is more appropriate for the category for which it is proposed.
If this is a course in literature:


1. Show that the course gives significant consideration to the aesthetic characteristics and the formal aspects of the works studied.


2. What aspects of literature will this course emphasize?  They may include authorship, audience, cultural attitudes or values, specific themes, stylistic and generic features, historical, socio-political and/or philosophical issues.
If this is a course in the arts:


1. List or describe the art forms, genres or specific objects to be studied.
2. How will the course concern itself with the characteristics of the medium and other appropriate issues, such as its social function, its means of conveying meaning, and the evaluation of the art forms?


3. Will the students participate in the creation of art?  If so, please elaborate.
If this is a course in historical perspectives:


1. What chronological and/or geographical aspect of human history is studied in this course?
2. Show how the course addresses continuity and change in the human experience and elucidates the development of institutions, ideas, beliefs, and social structures.


3. Show how the course familiarizes students with significant movements, persons, and events in their intellectual, social, economic, and political contexts.
If this is a course in philosophical perspectives:


1. How does the course offer a critical inquiry into problems of human thought, value, or existence, and engage students in the study of philosophical issues?

2. Show how the course involves either (i) study of philosophical works presenting perspectives on recurring intellectual, cultural, or social issues and problems, or (ii) study of an important institution, discipline or practice (e.g., law, religion, art, reasoning, science) that explores its place in life generally, its relation to other endeavors, and its claim to importance.
Social and Behavioral Sciences
1. If the course contains elements of both the Social Sciences and Behavioral Sciences categories below, show how the emphasis of the course makes it most appropriate for the category for which it is being proposed.

If it is a Social Sciences course:
1. What social groups, institutions, organizations, or processes are studied in this course? What is the chronological, geographical, or cultural area within the scope of the course?
2. Show how the course emphasizes persons in relation to other persons and to their environment.
3. Show how the course considers both methodological and substantive issues, and formulates and inquires into basic questions about the nature of social life.
If it is a Behavioral Sciences course:
1. Show how the course studies human behavior in an empirical approach.
2. Discuss the attention given in the course to the general issues and the methods of the behavioral sciences.
Cultural Studies
1. Show how the course treats topics and issues that promote a deeper understanding of the culture(s) discussed.
2. Show how the course provides at least one of the following: (i) a broad description and analysis of the interaction of intellectual, artistic, political, economic, social, and other aspects of a society's cultural life; (ii) an intensive investigation of the cultural life of a society or group in a particular time and place; (iii) a focused investigation of particular aspects of the culture of a society or group (e.g., its art and architecture); or (iv) a comparative investigation of cultural systems and the development of constructs for cross-cultural sensitivity and analysis.
3. If the course contains elements of both the Western and Non-Western categories below, but is being proposed for one of those categories, show how the emphasis of the course makes it more appropriate for the category for which it is being proposed.
If it is a Western/Comparative Culture(s) course:
1. Show how the course provides understanding and awareness of significant aspects of the cultural tradition evolved from the confluence of Greek and Roman philosophical thought and European religious traditions, i.e., the cultural traditions associated with European and North American countries; OR show how the course provides understanding and appreciation of significant aspects of the cultural traditions of both Western and Non-Western cultural traditions, and indicate the comparisons and contrasts drawn between the different traditions.
If it is a Non-Western or U.S. Minority Culture(s) course:
1. Show how the course provides understanding and awareness of significant aspects of cultural traditions that have their origins outside the Western cultural tradition or outside the dominant cultural tradition of the United States.




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