United States Foreign Policy Political Science 363



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United States Foreign Policy

Political Science 363

Barron Boyd

Mitchell Hall 119, ext. 4293


Before the September 11th attack on the World Trade Center, some questioned why they should know about the foreign policy of the United States or why they could care about events in other parts of the world. The 9/11 tragedy demonstrated the absolute necessity of knowing what is happening in other counties and the relevance of American foreign policy.
This course is designed to illustrate how policy is made and the various factors that shape and guide that policy. Any kind of policy making is a complex process. But because it is formulated in interaction with foreign governments and international events, the complexity of foreign policy is extraordinary. During the semester we will try to get an appreciation of how to make sense of such a complex process.
Though the course is not a “current events” exercise, real-world events will inevitably guide our discussions. You should, therefore, be prepared to keep up with event in the world, either though news magazines:

Time (http://www.time.com/time),

Newsweek (http://www.msnbc.com/news/NW-front_Front.asp),

US News and World Report (http://www.usnews.com/usnews).
Most newspapers are available online:

The New York Times (http://www.nytimes.com)

Washington Post (http://www.washingtonpost.com/)

are particularly good for coverage of world events.


The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/index.shtml

provides an international perspective on news from around the world.


A truly extraordinary site, http://www.kidon.com/media-link/index.shtml gives locations of media outlets—papers, magazines, video, radio—from around the world.
Readings: There is only one formal text for the course, Charles Kegley and Eugene Witkoph, American Foreign Policy. (6th edition.).
Since only one book is required, you must read it carefully and be prepared for each class.
Assignments:

Exams: 2 @ 15% each (30%)

Final Project @ 35%

Special Essays: write a minimum of four 2 page reactions to speakers, events, experiences that pertain to foreign policy. 5% each (20%)


Monday Geography quiz 10%

Class participation: 5%



Course Schedule
January 13: Introduction
January 15: Analytic Frameworks

Reading: Kegley and Witkoph, Ch. 1-2.



Patterns:

January 20: Themes of US Foreign Policy

Reading: Kegley and Witkoph, Ch 3
January 22: Themes II
January 27: Instruments of Power I

Reading: Kegley and Witkoph, Ch 4.


January 29: Instruments of Power II

Reading: Kegley and Witkoph, Ch 5



External Sources:

February 3: International System

Reading: Kegley and Witkoph, Ch. 6

February 5: International Political Economy

Reading: Kegley and Witkoph, Ch. 7
Societal Sources:

February 10: American Values

Reading: Kegley and Witkoph, Ch. 8
February 12,17, 19:Interest Groups, Media and Elections

Reading: Kegley and Witkoph, Ch. 9



February 24: Exam--

Governmental Sources:

February 26: The President and Foreign Policy

Reading: Kegley and Witkoph, Ch.
March 9 President II
March 11: Foreign Policy Bureaucracy

Reading: Kegley and Witkoph, Ch. 11


March 16: Congress and Foreign Policy

Reading: Kegley and Witkoph, Ch. 12


March 18: no class

Roles and Foreign Policy

March 23: Foreign Policy Decision-Making

Reading: Kegley and Witkoph, Ch. 13

Individuals and Foreign Policy

March 25: Leaders and their traits

Reading: Kegley and Witkoph, Ch. 14
March 30: Leaders II

Reading: Kegley and Witkoph, Ch.


April 1: The Future?

Reading: Kegley and Witkoph, Ch 15.


April 6: Final “Content” Exam
April 8: prepare for Presentations
April 15 Presentations
April 20: Presentations
April 22: Presentations
April 27: Presentations
May 29: Conclusion


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