Unit Title: Interpreting the Past – The Case of the “Bloody Massacre” Designed by: Fran O’Malley Director, Delaware Social Studies Education Project



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Essential Questions


  • Why might historians disagree about the same historical event?

  • To what extent does history change?



Prior Knowledge

Now that you understand that historians disagree and some reasons why they might disagree, you are prepared to critique sources about the Boston Massacre.

Problem

Delaware’s largest newspaper features a “Life and Leisure” section that offers book, video, and website reviews every Sunday. The editor of the “Life and Leisure” section has given you the assignment of preparing a special feature on the Boston Massacre as part of its March Into History series—a series highlighting famous events that occurred in March.

Role/Perspective

You are a feature writer for Delaware’s largest newspaper.

Product/Performance

You are to write a review of a book, video, or website that deals with the Boston Massacre (maximum length is 250 words).

Your review should include:



Criteria for an Exemplary Response

Be sure to include:

  • A description of the interpretation(s) that appear in the source

  • A critique of the interpretation(s) based on the evidence that is used to support it

  • Reasons why you would OR would not recommend the book, website, or video

  • The use of content appropriate vocabulary (interpretation, conclusion, sources, massacre)

Teacher Tip: Have students read a sample book review prior to beginning their own review. Important elements such as the thesis, supporting evidence, gaps, and what question drove the author should be identified. Book reviews that might be used as models are available at the following site: http://ehistory.osu.edu/osu/reviews/?orderby=title

Rubric

Scoring Category

This review provides…

Score Point 3

Score Point 2

Score Point 1

a description of the interpretation(s) that appear in the source

The explanation provides a thorough description of the interpretations that appear in the source

The explanation provides a partial description of the interpretations that appear in the source

The explanation provides a minimal description of the interpretations that appear in the source

a critique of the evidence that influenced the interpretation(s)

Provides a persuasive critique of the factors used to support those interpretations

Provides a somewhat persuasive critique of the evidence used to support those interpretations

Provides a minimally persuasive critique of the evidence used to support those interpretations

reasons why you would OR would not recommend the book, website, or video

Provides well-developed reasoning for why you would or would not recommend the book, website, or video

Provides partially developed reasoning for why you would or would not recommend the book, website, or video

Provides minimally developed reasoning for why you would or would not recommend the book, website, or video

the use of content appropriate-vocabulary (interpretation)

The content-appropriate vocabulary is well developed and evidence

There is some evidence of content-appropriate vocabulary

There is minimal evidence of content-appropriate vocabulary

Total Score: _________

Above the Standard: _____

Meets the Standard: _____

Below the Standard: _____

Other Evidence

When students are required to think about their own learning, to articulate what they understand and what they still need to learn, achievement improves.

– Black and William, 1998; Sternberg, 1996; Young, 2000.

How a teacher uses the information from assessments determines whether that assessment is formative or summative. Formative assessments should be used to direct learning and instruction and are not intended to be graded.

The Checks for Understanding at the end of each instructional strategy should be used as formative assessment and may be used as writing prompts or as small-group or whole-class discussion. Students should respond to feedback and be given opportunities to improve their work. The rubrics will help teachers frame that feedback.

An interactive notebook or writing log could be used to organize student work and exhibit student growth and reflection.



Stage 3 – Learning Plan

Design learning activities to align with Stage 1 and Stage 2 expectations


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