Unit Plan Social Studies Grade 8 World History: Societies of the Past Ancient Society’s of Greece and Rome Brittany Adriaansen, Amanda Ginter, Nicholas Onischuk Year Outline of Topics



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Unit Plan Social Studies

Grade 8

World History: Societies of the Past

Ancient Society’s of Greece and Rome

Brittany Adriaansen, Amanda Ginter, Nicholas Onischuk

Year Outline of Topics


Cluster and Topics

Approximate Time

Understanding Societies Past and Present

1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4



3 Weeks

3 days
4 days


4 days
3 days

Early Societies of Mesopotamia, Egypt, or the Indus Valley
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4



3 Weeks

3 days
4 days


3 days
4 days

Ancient Societies of Greece and Rome
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5


5 Weeks
4 days
6 days
5 days
6 days
4 days

Transition to the Modern World (Circa 500 to 1400)
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5

5 Weeks

4 days
6 days


5 days
6 days
4 days

Shaping the Modern World (Circa 1400 to 1850)
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4


4 Weeks

5 days
5 days


5 days
5 days




Cluster Description and Rational:
Cluster 3 begins with a brief world overview, focusing on China, Greece, Rome, Persia, and the Mayas from about 500 BCE to 500 CE. This overview includes a consideration of world religions that emerged during this time period. Students then explore life in ancient societies of both Greece and Rome. This comprehensive study focuses on the physical environment and the social, cultural, political, economic, and technological issues of these societies. Students consider the enduring qualities of the art, architecture, science, and ideas of ancient Greece and Rome, and explore their influence on the contemporary world.

Key Concepts

Greece: rise and decline, social organization, citizenship and democracy, life in Sparta and Athens, Greek myths, technology, and achievements

Rome: rise and decline, governance, trade, empire building, war and territorial expansion, technology, and achievements
Unit Topics – Description of Learning Experiences and Enduring Understanding
8.3.1 Overview of Antiquity

Enduring Understanding

Powerful and complex civilizations rose and fell in Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and Central America during the historical period often referred to as antiquity. These civilizations transformed the ancient world and had an enduring global impact on cultures and societies.



Description of the Learning Experience

Students map the major civilizations of antiquity, engage in collaborative learning to explore defining features of these civilizations, and learn about the world religions that emerged during this period.


8.3.2 Culture of Ancient Greece

Enduring Understanding

The art and culture, social organization, thought, and values that flourished in the city-states of ancient Greece had a far-reaching impact on the development of western societies.



Description of the Learning Experience

Students explore people, events, and ideas that defined the culture of ancient Greece, compare life in the city- states of Sparta and Athens, and read and discuss Greek myths.


8.3.3 Democracy in Ancient Greece

Ancient Greek society developed many of the basic principles of democracy and citizenship that have influenced Western political thought and governance through the ages.



Description of the Learning Experience

Students explore Greek thought about “rule by the many” as opposed to “rule by the few,” consider the influence of Greek democracy on modern governance, and participate in role-plays to explore the nature of collective decision making.


8.3.4 Roman Empire

Enduring Understanding

The Roman Empire dominated Europe, Asia Minor, and northern Africa with its powerful structures of governance and law, military strength and organization, and its extensive system of trade and transportation.



Description of the Learning Experience

Students create timelines and maps of the development of the Roman Empire and explore the structures of governance, military organization, and trading networks established by Rome.




8.3.5 Legacy of Ancient Greece and Rome

Enduring Understanding

Greek and Roman civilizations dominated European culture for many centuries and continue to have a profound impact on culture, language, thought, science, and the arts in contemporary societies.



Description of the Learning Experience

Students investigate diverse examples of the achievements and cultural influence of Greece and Rome; they consider and compare factors that influenced the rise and decline of these classical civilization.




Outcomes

Objectives

Method

Resources

Evaluation

8.3.1

KG-039 Identify defining characteristics of the ancient civilizations of China, Greece, Rome, Persia, and the Mayas from

500 BCE to 500 CE.
KI-017-Identify defining characteristics of world religions that emerged in antiquity.

Include: Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism,

Judaism.
VI-006 Respect others’ ways of life and beliefs

Overview of Antiquity: Students will be able to clearly explain the most prominent characteristics of China, Greece, Rome, Persia, and the Mayas.


Students will be able to broaden the respect for others ways of lives and beliefs

Activating

Collaborative groups of students engage in a Sort and Predict exercise about the defining characteristics of the ancient civilizations of China, Greece, Rome, Persia, and the Maya from 500 BCE to 500 CE. Students apply their prior Knowledge, and use critical reasoning to decide which characteristics may fit which civilization at this point in their learning. (They will later verify their predictions through research.)



Acquire

Students are asked to observe that acceptance of religious and cultural diversity was a feature of some ancient societies (e.g., Persia), but not others (e.g., Rome’s persecution of Christianity, Greece’s sentencing of Socrates to death, the belief in ancient China that non-Chinese persons were barbaric...). Students consider the principle of respect for the ways of life and beliefs of others, asking themselves how this can be demonstrated in the classroom. Working in collaborative groups, they generate four or five short descriptors that show their ways of life and others are respecting beliefs in the class. Each group presents their descriptors, and the class decides collectively on four simple guidelines to be applied throughout the year



Apply

Using the images of primary sources selected in the Acquiring phase of this learning experience, collaborative groups of students design and present a multimedia presentation of their selected images. As part of their presentation, students identify the source of each image, and provide an oral account of the historical importance of each image. Following the presentations, the class discusses similarities they have observed among these civilizations of antiquity.




8.3.1f BLM Sort and Predict: Defining Characteristics of Ancient Societies


Observation of student’s involvement and statements presented in the acquiring stage.
Presentations in the applying stage will express understanding and knowledge of the subject area.




Outcomes

Objectives

Method

Resources

Evaluation

8.3.2

KC- 001 Describe the social organization of ancient Greece.


KI- 015 Compare and contrast life in Sparta and Athens
KI-016 Describe the importance of Greek myths in ancient Greek Culture
KH-031 Identify People, events, and ideas in ancient Greece and Rome
VH- 011 Appreciate stories, legends, and myths of ancient societies as important ways to learn about the past

Culture of Ancient Greece: Students will be able to describe the social organizations of ancient Greece and appreciate myths and legends of they societies past.

Activate

Using their prior knowledge of myths, legends, origin stories, and the traditional oral narratives of oral tradition of indigenous cultures, students generate a working description of the role, subject matter, influence, and importance of mythology in societies throughout history. Students may wish to engage in a discussion about the relevance of myth and legend in modern times. Prompting questions include:

• Can myths teach us about certain subjects, or provoke thought?

• What kinds of myths do we see in modern industrialized societies?

• Do myths still influence people’s beliefs and values?

Acquire

Using print and electronic resources, collaborative groups of students research one of the major Greek gods, goddesses, or heroes. They prepare an illustrated poster that summarizes the myth or story of this deity and explains his or her importance in Greek culture (e.g., values and beliefs, practices, art, rituals...). Student posters are displayed in an area of the class designated as “Mount Olympus, Home of the Gods.” After circulating to view the posters, students discuss which myths they consider to be the most relevant to life and values in modern societies.



Apply

Students draw a Mind Map to illustrate the influence and importance of myths in ancient Greek culture. Students may include illustrations or representations of the gods or goddesses of Mount Olympus, explaining their powers and their significance. The Mind Map should depict the Greeks’ concept of the role of humans in relation to the gods (e.g., the concept of pleasing the gods, the concept of accepting one’s fate, the concept of not transgressing limits through human pride or “hubris,” differences and similarities between humans and the immortals…).



8.3.2f Greek Mythology Handout

Student’s posters and mind maps can be assessed for understanding of Greek culture.





Outcomes

Objectives

Methods

Resources

Evaluation

8.3.3

KC-002 Describe the rise of democracy in ancient Greece


KC-003 Compare criteria for citizenship and participation in government in ancient Greece and in contemporary Canada
VC-001 Appreciate the contributions of ancient Greece to modern concepts of citizenship and democracy.

VP-016 Appreciate the benefits of citizenship within a democracy.




Democracy in Ancient Greece:
Students will understand how democracy affected the people of citizens of Greece.

Activate

Students brainstorm ideas to create a web illustrating the concept of democracy. Ideas generated by the students should be organized under key ideas (e.g. Democratic principles, government, rights, responsibilities, citizenship, rule of law, equality, freedom, justice…). Students view the webs and discuss Canadian democracy, including the benefits of living in a democratic society.



Acquire

Students are divided into five groups to gather information on different forms of government as identified by Greek thinkers (Plato, Aristotle): tyranny, monarchy, oligarchy or aristocracy, and democracy. Each group creates a two- or three-minute skit that portrays the concept or form of government they have been assigned. Following each presentation, the class discusses differences and similarities among forms of government, and considers which forms they find to be the most just and/or the most effective.



Apply

Students develop a Mind Map or illustrated chart outlining how the Greek system of direct democracy worked in Athens at the height of its civilization (i.e., during the time of Pericles). Students share their Mind Maps with their peers, discussing similarities and differences between modern and ancient democracy and citizenship.



8.3.3b BLM: Forms of Government


During the performances students will show understanding of democracy and the influence in Greek culture.

In the mind maps students will show knowledge and understanding of the Greek government system and the differences between todays society.






Outcomes

Objectives

Methods

Resources

Evaluation

8.3.4

KL-025 Illustrate on a map the expansion of the Roman Empire.


KP-048 Describe the nature of war and territorial expansion in the Roman Empire.
KH-031 Identify people, events, and ideas in ancient Greece and Rome,

KP-047 Describe structures of governance in ancient Rome.


KE-055 Describe the influence of trade on the exchange of ideas within the Roman Empire and between Rome and other places in the world

Roman Empire:

Students will be able to locate the various locations of ancient Rome on a present day map.


They will be able to explain the importance of war to Rome’s territorial expansion.
Describe the various levels of the Roman Government

Activate

Collaborative groups of students brainstorm what they know about ancient Rome. Groups share their webs in a plenary session, generating questions for further inquiry into the Roman Empire.



Acquire

Collaborative groups of students select two people, events, or ideas as research topics regarding the rise and expansion of the Roman Empire. Using print and electronic resources, each group gathers information on the topic to create a one page illustrated handout, summarizing the key points of their research to share with other students.



Apply

Students present a persuasive speech, enhanced by visual supports, describing what they consider to be the most important person, event, or idea in ancient Rome. Students should take the perspective of a historian, explaining the historical significance of the event and its impact during Roman times and in subsequent eras. Following the presentations, students may decide to vote on what they consider to be the “Top Five” historic moments of the Roman Empire. Each of five groups may create a distinctive marker illustrating one of the selected events, people, or ideas for inclusion on the wall timeline.



8.3.4 d BLM: Events, People, and Ideas of the Roman Empire (2 pages)


Students will present their research finding which provides observation for understanding of topic area.
Student’s debates will show great knowledge and understanding of important aspect of Roman history.




Outcomes

Objectives

Methods

Resources

Evaluation

8.3.5

KH-032 Identify ways in which today’s world has been influenced by the ideas of ancient Greece and Rome.



Examples: the arts, philosophy, science, mathematics...

KP-046 Identify factors that influenced the rise and decline of ancient Greece and Rome.


KE-056 Describe technologies and achievements in ancient Greece and Rome.

Examples: architecture, transportation, weapons, aqueducts...

VI-005 Appreciate the enduring qualities of the arts, architecture, science, and ideas of

ancient Greece and Rome.


Legacy of Ancient Greece and Rome:
Students will be able to make connections with today’s society and Ancient Greece and Rome.

Students will be able to distinguish the main factors that lead to the fall of the Greek and Roman Empires.




Activate

Pairs or triads of students find definitions of the term classical, and create a concept overview showing how the word is often used by historians and the values it entails. Student share their Concept Overview with each other and discuss characteristics that have made Greece and Rome exemplars of classical civilizations.



Acquire

Pairs or triads of students select a historical achievement or idea of enduring influence that originated in ancient Greece or Rome. Using print or electronic resources, students gather information on ways in which our contemporary world has been influenced by the selected achievement or idea, and create a short illustrated placard for a “Classical Hall of Fame” for the classroom.



Supporting websites can be found at

Apply

Students create a museum Gallery of Antiquity in which they display exhibits of the technologies, achievements, ideas, and arts of ancient Greece and Rome.

Ideas for exhibits include:

• Models or posters of Greek or Roman cities, architecture, monuments, or art

• Student reproductions of artifacts or extracts of ancient writings

• Scientific or mathematical demonstrations

• Student simulations of individuals of Ancient Greece or Rome making speeches, performing drama, teaching, discussing ideas, or making political decisions

Students invite guests (e.g., other classes in the school, parents, senior groups…) to view the displays and interact with the presenters as they would in a museum.

Students may prepare Exit Slips, and invite guests to respond to the displays, to gather information about the effectiveness of their presentations.


8.3.5a BLM: Classical Civilizations: Concept Overview


Students will show understanding of influences that originate in Greece or Rome within their acquiring activities.

Students will show the knowledge and understanding of ideas of achievements that have had an influence on todays world.



Block Plan
8.3 Ancient Societies of Greece and Rome

MONDAY


TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY


Oct. 15

8.3.1
Overview of Antiquity




Oct 16

8.3.1
Overview of Antiquity





Oct 17

8.3.1
Overview of Antiquity





Oct 18

8.3.1
Overview of Antiquity




Oct 19

8.3.2
Culture of Ancient Greece


.

Oct. 22

8.3.2
Culture of Ancient Greece





Oct. 23

8.3.2
Culture of Ancient Greece





Oct. 24

8.3.2
Culture of Ancient Greece





Oct. 25

8.3.2
Culture of Ancient Greece




Oct. 26

8.3.2
Culture of Ancient Greece




Oct. 29

8.3.3
Democracy in Ancient Greece




Oct. 30

8.3.3
Democracy in Ancient Greece




Oct. 31

8.3.3
Democracy in Ancient Greece




Nov 1

8.3.3
Democracy in Ancient Greece




Nov 2

8.3.3
Democracy in Ancient Greece




Nov 5

8.3.4
Roman Empire




Nov 6

8.3.4
Roman Empire




Nov 7

8.3.4
Roman Empire




Nov 8

8.3.4
Roman Empire





Nov 9

8.3.4
Roman Empire





Nov 11

8.3.4
Roman Empire

Nov 11


Nov 12

8.3.5
Legacy of Ancient Greece and Rome




Nov 13

8.3.5
Legacy of Ancient Greece and Rome




Nov 14

8.3.5
Legacy of Ancient Greece and Rome




Nov 14

8.3.5
Legacy of Ancient Greece and Rome




Resources
Manitoba Social Studies Curriculum

Manitoba Social Studies Blackline Masters

Ancient Times: A Watts Guide for Children

World History: Societies of the Past

Ancient Greece: 40 Hands on Activities to Experience this Wondrous Age
(Check Reference Page for APA full referencing)

Unit Plan
Opening Activity

To engage students in this cluster the teacher can arrive in class dressed in a toga or other period costumes. They should then assume the role of the chosen costume. They will then highlight aspects of Greece and Rome through a class discussion. The discussion should include a broad over view of what they are going to experience in the cluster. Things like ancient sports, Greek gods, architecture of Greece and Rome, arts of ancient Greece and Rome and the impacts and inventions that affect our society today.


Closing Activity

To wrap up the unit the teacher will plan an Ancient Olympic Games for the class. The games will include a variety of areas from the unit. Stations for the games would include participating in famous ancient sports, arts like pottery and theatre, creating kotinos (olive branch head piece), and mapping trivia games.


EVALUATION/ASSESSMENT PLAN

Formative Assessment

During the unit, students will write in Journals. These will be nothing more than regular notebooks in which they write about things such as “What I Know Now, What I Want to Know,” Mind Mapping, and personal reflections. These will be handed in periodically for the teacher to observe how students are feeling about the course, what they may need more insight into, and so forth.

During many classes a discussion period will take place in which students can voice their opinions, knowledge or inquiry and receive feedback from their peers and the teacher. This is a perfect opportunity to observe comprehension and retention of key concepts that have already been discussed.
Summative Assessment
Summative assessment will be comprised of activities and projects carried out individually or in collaborative groups. These will either be handed in to the teacher for marking, observed through presentation or will be peer evaluated through gallery walks when possible. There will be a final test at the end of the unit containing questions from every sub-cluster of the unit, adhering to the basic levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Distinct rubrics will be created for classroom activities and projects to give to the students as a guide to follow. A short review of concepts for the unit test will be handed out during the review period, so students will know what is expected of them for the unit test.



Final Test Outline
8.3.1 - 10 true or false questions on characteristics of ancient societies. Things like beliefs or religion to be covered.

8.3.2 – 10 matching questions on Greek myths and legends that were covered in the student projects.

8.3.3 – Short answer question on the government in ancient Greece relating it to modern society.

8.3.4 – Short answer question on the rise and expansion of the Roman Empire. This can include events, people and ideas.

8.3.5 – Short answer question on explaining why historians would refer to ancient Rome and Greece as the Land of First. This should highlight inventions or ideas of this time that influence modern day society.



Matching, True and False

Short Answer Question

Corresponding marks apply.

Articulates ideas very clearly and efficiently. Shows an understanding of the key concepts.





Articulates ideas and key concepts well.





Does a somewhat reasonable job of articulating ideas and key concepts.





Does not articulate ideas and key concepts well.



Marks for matching, true and false questions ___ / 20 marks

Short Answer Questions Articulation and Clarity ___ / 15 marks



___/ 35 Total Marks



Grading Rubric

8.3.2 Cultures of Ancient Greece
Outcomes
KC- 001 Describe the social organization of ancient Greece.
VH- 011 Appreciate stories, legends, and myths of ancient societies as important ways to learn about the past.
Activating


  • Have the students use their prior knowledge about myths, legends and other traditional oral traditions of the indigenous culture.

  • Have them create a description of the role, subject matter, influence and importance of mythology in societies of the past in their journals.

  • After students may wish to engage in a discussion about myth in modern times. Some questions may include: Can myths teach us about certain subjects, or provoke thought? What kinds of myths do we see in modern industrialized societies? Do myths still influence people’s beliefs and values?


Acquiring


  • Students should use print and electronic form to research in group’s one major topic of Greek gods, goddesses or hero’s.

  • Have each group prepare an illustrated poster summarizing the myth or story of this deity and explain his or her role or importance in Greek culture.

  • Student’s posters can be displayed in an area labeled “Mount Olympus, Home of the Gods.”

  • Have all the students view each group’s work and determine the most important or relevant to life values in modern society.


Applying


  • Students will create a Mind Map to illustrate influence and importance of myths in ancient Greek culture.

  • Students should include illustrations or representations of gods or goddesses of Mount Olympus explaining their powers and significance.

  • The Mind Map should depict the Greeks’ concept of the roles of humans in relation to the gods (e.g., the concept of pleasing the gods, the concept of accepting one’s fate, the concept of not transgressing limits through human pride or “hubris,” differences and similarities between humans and the immortals…).


Assessment


  • Student’s posters and mind maps can be assessed for understanding of Greek myths and culture.


Resources
8.3.2f Greek Mythology Handout

8.3.4 Roman Empire

Outcomes
KL-025 Illustrate on a map the expansion of the Roman Empire.

KP-048 Describe the nature of war and territorial expansion in the Roman Empire.

KP-047 Describe the structures of governance in ancient Rome.
Activating


  • Have students brainstorm in group’s previous knowledge about ancient Rome.

  • The will sort their ideas into a web. The web should include the main elements of civilization like people, events or ideas.

  • Have each group share their webs. This can lead to further inquire into the Roman Empire.


Acquiring


  • Break the students into groups of two.

  • Have the students select two people, events or ideas as a research focus.

  • Each research area should include topics in regards to the rise and expansion of the Roman Empire.

  • Have the students use electronic and print form resources to gather research information on their chosen topic.

  • Have the students create a one-page illustration outlining the key information gathered on their topic areas.

  • Have each group present their findings to the other student.


Applying


  • Have each student decide on what they feel is the most important person, event or idea from the Roman Empire.

  • Then have each student research and prepare a short persuasive speech on his or her chosen topic.

  • Students should take the role of a historian telling the significance and impact of the event, person or idea they have chosen.

  • They should have visual aspect to enhance the speech persuasion.

  • Have each student present his or her speech and visual aspect that relates.

  • After all the speeches, as a class, have the students place their visual aspect on a time line that represents that period of the Roman Empire.



Assessment


  • The group research will provide bases for understanding of people, events or ideas that underline the Roman Empire.

  • The speeches will provide a formative assessment of understanding from a topic area of the Roman Empire.

  • Summative assessment will be in the final test at the end of the unit.


Resources
8.3.4 d BLM: Events, People, and Ideas of the Roman Empire (2 pages)

8.3.5 Legacy of Ancient Greece and Rome
Outcomes:

KH-032 Identify ways in which today’s world has been influenced by the ideas of ancient Greece and Rome.



Examples: the arts, philosophy, science, mathematics...
KE-056 Describe technologies and achievements in ancient Greece and Rome.

Examples: architecture, transportation, weapons, aqueducts...
Activating:

  • Class question on what is Canada’s legacy. What is our country known for? (snow, hockey)

  • Class discussion/brainstorm on why historians referred to this time period as the “land of first” What legacy did this time period leave? What influences us still today?

  • Show a quick video clip Inventions and Discoveries in Greece and Rome.

  • Together as a class we come up with a list of inventions/ideas that evolved at this time.


Acquiring:


  • In pairs select an invention /idea/advancement and create a short illustrated poster for a “Museum Gallery Display” for the classroom. Research the information and highlight how your chosen idea/invention/advancement has influenced today’s society.

  • Research topics could range from the wheel, irrigation, weapon, architecture, astronomy, math etc.


Applying:


  • Students will display their finished poster in our “Museum Gallery Display” and briefly present their topic.

  • Presentation should illustrate the enduring legacy of ancient Greece and Rome and their influence on western civilizations over time.

  • Following the presentations, as a whole class, students discuss evidence in contemporary society of the enduring influence of these civilizations, and consider why they are often considered this time the “land of the firsts”.


Assessment:
Formative:

  • Observation of research methods and strategies, in their abilities in finding appropriate material for their poster presentation.

  • Observing class participation and discussions in regards to the legacy of Greece and Rome.

Summative:




  • Unit test at end of this sub-cluster will be comprised of some material covered in today’s lecture and activities. A short answer type of question highlighting the legacy of Greece and Rome. Why was it considered the land of first?


References:
Inventions and Discoveries in Ancient Mesopotamia

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2lL20SBiIk
Mr. Donn Ancient Greece Website

http://greece.mrdonn.org/

Reference

(2006). Grade 8 social studies: Societies of the past. Winnipeg, MB: Manitoba Education, Citizenship.

Austrian, G. (1999). Ancient times: A watts guide for children. New York: Franklin Watts.

Donn. (n.d.). Mr. donn. Retrieved from http://www.mrdonn.org/



Grade 8 greek mythology. (n.d.). Retrieved from: http://kitsilano.vsb.bc.ca/library/EN08myths.htm

Hart, A. & Paul Mentell (1999). Ancient greece!. Charlotte, Vermont: Williamson Publishing.



McDowell, L., & Mackay, M. (2005). World history societies of the past: Teacher's guide. Winnipeg, MB: Portage & Main Press.


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