Unit overview



Download 79.4 Kb.
Date conversion16.05.2016
Size79.4 Kb.

DRAFT Unit Plan Template – Table Format DRAFTpowerpluswatermarkobject357831064

UNIT TOPIC: More Money, More Power, More Problems: From Exploration to The Founding of a New Nation

CONCEPTUAL LENS: Identity and Profit

UNIT OVERVIEW:

This unit will focus on the time period of the Age of Exploration through the forming of the American nation. Europeans had a variety of reasons for exploration and seeking new places west of the European and African continents. Whether it was the glory of finding new lands and riches to claim for their financers, the adventure of discovery, or the opportunity to spread their religious beliefs Although the explorers, no matter what their nationality, identified with the nation that financed their explorations, Europeans ultimately identified themselves as peoples who were “civilized” and thus were obligated to bring civilization to any area they discovered. The English exploration of North America during the17th century occurred for various reasons. Some groups were pious, self-disciplined people who wanted to escape religious persecution while other groups were set up as business ventures. Both reasons, piety and profits, went hand-in-hand.

While all major nations involved in the exploration of the new world, particularly North America, did so for differing reasons, England's ultimate goal was to colonize and gain increased economic and political power. Their success at colonizing lands that would become the United States was due primarily because of its use of charter companies which sought personal economic gain and, that wanted to advance England's national goals. The private investors financed the new concept of charter companies and monarchies, usually the King, provided each project with a charter or grant which typically conferred economic rights as well as political and judicial authority. This unit will highlight the fact that the colonies generally did not show quick profits and the English investors often turned over their colonial charters to the settlers. The political implications of turning over charters to the settlers turned out to be enormous. The investors and English governments generally left the colonists alone to build their own lives, their own communities, their own economy and their own identity, which soon became less English and more American and as a result, to start rebelling against what they saw as repressive and abusive behavior from England and start building upon principles they had begun to cultivate in the colonies. Principles that would become the foundations of a new nation with a new government would be incorporated into a new form of government with the development of the new nation known as the United States.



SCOS OBJECTIVES ADDRESSED


Content Standards for the Unit (These should appear in your Content/Concept Web)

AH1.H.2.1, AH1.H.2.2, AH1.H.3.1, AH1.H.3.2, AH1.H.3.4, AH1.H.7.1, AH1.H.7.2, AH1.H.7.3, AH1.H.8.2, AH1.H.8.3


  • AH1.H.2.1 Analyze key political, economic, and social turning points from colonization through Reconstruction in terms of causes and effects (e.g., conflicts, legislation, elections, innovations, leadership, movements, Supreme Court decisions, etc.).

  • AH1.H.2.2 Evaluate key turning points from colonization through Reconstruction in terms of their lasting impact (e.g., conflicts, legislation, elections, innovations, leadership, movements, Supreme Court decisions, etc.).

  • AH1.H.3.1 Analyze how economic, political, social, military and religious factors influenced European exploration and American colonial settlement (e.g., Reformation, mercantilism, improvements in navigation technology, colonization, defeat of Spanish Armada, Great Awakening, etc.).

  • AH1.H.3.2 Explain how environmental, cultural and economic factors influenced the patterns of migration and settlement within the U.S. before the Civil War (e.g., economic diversity of regions, mercantilism, cash crops, triangular trade, ethnic diversity, American Indian beliefs about land ownership, Lewis & Clark expedition, farming, Industrial Revolution, etc.).

  • AH1.H.3.4 Analyze voluntary and involuntary immigration trends through Reconstruction in terms of causes, regions of origin and destination, cultural contributions, and public and governmental response (e.g., Puritans, Pilgrims, American Indians, Quakers, Scotch-Irish, Chinese, Africans, indentured servants, slavery, Middle Passage, farming, ideas of the Enlightenment, etc.).

  • AH1.H.7.1 Explain the impact of wars on American politics through Reconstruction (e.g., Issues of taxation without representation, Proclamation of 1763, Proclamation of Neutrality, XYZ Affair, Alien & Sedition Acts, War Hawks, Hartford Convention, slavery Compromises, scalawags, carpetbaggers, etc.).

  • AH1.H.7.2 Explain the impact of wars on the American economy through Reconstruction (e.g., colonial debt, salutary neglect, protective tariffs, inflation, profiteering, Hamilton’s economic plan, embargo, etc.).

  • AH1.H.7.3 Explain the impact of wars on American society and culture through Reconstruction (e.g., salutary neglect, slavery, breakup of the plantation system, carpetbaggers, scalawags, KKK, and relocation of American Indians, etc.).

  • AH1.H.8.2 Explain how opportunity and mobility impacted various groups within American society through Reconstruction (e.g., Lowell and other “mill towns”, Manifest Destiny, immigrants/migrants, Gold Rush, Homestead Act, Morrill Act, Exodusters, women, various ethnic groups, etc.).

  • AH1.H.8.3 Evaluate the extent to which a variety of groups and individuals have had opportunity to attain their perception of the “American Dream” through Reconstruction (e.g., plantation society, transcendentalism, 49ers, etc.).


The Skill Standards for this Unit (These should NOT appear in your Content/Concept Web)

  • AH1.H.1.1.2 Interpret data presented in time lines and create time lines

  • AH1.H.1.2.3 Analyze data in historical maps

  • AH1.H.1.2.4 Analyze visual, literary and musical sources

  • AH1.H.1.3.1 Identify issues and problems in the past

  • AH1.H.1.3.2 Consider multiple perspectives of various peoples in the past.

  • AH1.H.1.3.3 Analyze cause-and-effect relationships and multiple causation.

  • AH1.H.1.3.4 Evaluate competing historical narratives and debates among historians.

  • AH1.H.1.3.5 Evaluate the influence of the past on contemporary issues.

  • AH1.H.1.4.3 Obtain historical data from a variety of sources

  • AH1.H.1.4.4 Support interpretations with historical evidence




UNIT WEBBING


History

Civics & Government

Economics & PFL

Geography & Environmental Literacy

Culture


List Clarifying Objectives

AH1.H.2.2, AH1.H.8.3

List Clarifying Objectives

AH1.H.2.1, AH1.H.7.1,

List Clarifying Objectives

AH1.H.3.1, AH1.H.3.4 AH1.H.7.2, AH1.H.8.2

List Clarifying Objectives
AH1.H.3.1, AH1.H.3.2, AH1.H.3.4

List Clarifying Objectives
AH1.H.7.3, AH1.H.3.4


Concepts & Content

Concepts & Content

Concepts & Content

Concepts & Content

Concepts & Content

Exploration

  • Eastern Coast of the North American Mainland


Turning Point

  • Defeat of the Spanish Armada


Colonization

  • Jamestown

  • Massachusetts Bay Colony


Opportunity

  • Jamestown

  • Massachusetts Bay Colony


Conflict

  • Protestant Reformation

  • Bankruptcy of the East India Tea Company

  • French & Indian War




Taxation

  • Colonial Acts

  • No Taxation w/o Representation

  • Royal Governors


Power

  • King George

  • Parliament


Decisions


Representation

  • Self- Government

  • Parliament

  • Royal Governors

  • Continental Congress


Laws

  • Compromise Proclamation of 1763




Accumulation of wealth for European nations as a result of exploration
Growth of Commerce
Charter Companies
Proprietary Colonies
England’s Hugh War Debts
Hamilton’s Plan
Stamp Act
Sugar Act
Tea Act

Mercantilism


Trade
Wealth

Treaty of Tordesillas

Middle, New England and Southern Colonies

Movement

Region


Expansion

Settlement



The Columbian Exchange
Diseases ravage the natives of the new world
Forced slave labor

Indenturing servants


Christopher Columbus
Plantation Society
Various racial, ethnic and religious groups (Germans, Scotch –Irish, Catholics, Africans, etc.)

Interaction


Culture
Diversity
Cultural Development

















GENERALIZATIONS AND GUIDING QUESTIONS





  1. Turning points may have impacts over large periods of time and relevance to contemporary events, problems and issues.





  1. Turning points are key events that often mark significant historical, geographical, political, economic, or social change.




  • Why is the French and Indian War often considered a turning point in American History? (F)



  1. A nation’s government and its political leaders often assume more authority during periods of conflict, rebellion or warfare.




  1. Individuals and groups may feel justified to protest and rebel against a government when it no longer demonstrates the will or ability to protect and serve its citizens.




  • Why did the American colonists feel their rights were not being considered by those in government in England? (F)

  • In what instances do the political decisions of a democratic government restrict or violate the rights of its people? ( C )

  • When the government elected to serve the people no longer behaves with the people’s best interest in mind, are the people justified if they rebel? (P)



  1. Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness often influence an individual or groups determination to seek opportunities for improvement.

  • What were the reasons for the Puritans settling in the new world? (F)

  • Why do individuals or groups often see relocation as a means for greater opportunity and self-improvement? (C)

  • Does freedom guarantee opportunity or improved quality of life? (P )




  1. A nation may choose to colonize other regions of the world to expand its economic and political power.




  1. Nations may have difficulty financing war efforts and overcoming the economic challenges that results from war.



  • How might debt from wars affect a nation’s economic and political actions? ( C )

  • In what ways can economic goals affect government actions and individual rights? (C)




  1. Unreasonable actions by governments often bring people into conflict with those in authority and can result in armed violence and protest.

  • How did the bankruptcy status of the East India Tea Co. lead to a call for independence? (F)




  1. Nations and individuals motivated by power, wealth, and a desire for resources may experience exploration and settlement from different perspectives.






  1. Forces that push or pull various groups of people to move to a particular place or region may factor into the cultural development of that place or region.




  1. Diverse individuals and groups that settle into a particular region shape the cultural identity of that region.




  1. Diverse groups of immigrants can contribute to the cultural, social, economic and political development of a nation.




CRITICAL

CONTENT



Students should know:

  1. The major nations that explored the new world and why

  2. The economic benefits that European nations experienced by exploring the new world and eventually North America

  3. The impact mercantilism had on exploration

  4. The major reasons France, Spain, and England each explored North America

  5. Where France, Spain, and England each primarily staked geographic claims to land in North America

  6. The different economies of the American colonies

  7. Salutary Neglect and how it worked in the American English colonies

  8. Middle, New England and Southern colonies (identify)

  9. Results of the French and Indian War (debt)

  10. Ways England tried to get colonies to help foot the debt caused by the French and Indian War

  11. Taxation without Representation

  12. Various Acts passed by England (Stamp, Sugar, Navigation, Tea, etc.)

  13. Cultural characteristics of various groups in various areas of the colonies

  14. Reasons for various groups settling where they did in the colonies (Pilgrims, Puritans, Catholics, Germans, Scotch-Irish, Africans, etc.)

  15. Patriots, loyalists, fence straddlers

  16. Identifying characteristics of being American

  17. Turning points during the time period of the unit (i.e., defeat of the Spanish Armada, establishment of the Church of England, English winning the French and Indian War, Tea Act, etc,)

  18. Key individuals involved in exploring the new world for Spain

  19. Key individuals involved in exploring North America for France and England

  20. Key individuals involved in the colonial era protests against English treatment of the colonies

  21. Why some colonists identified themselves as American, British or as a part of some other ethnic or religious group

  22. Key leaders involved in the winning the Revolutionary War

  23. Reasons why the Articles of Confederation did not work

  24. The conflict and compromise that led to the U.S. Constitution

  25. Key political documents of the time period between Exploration and the U.S. Constitution

  26. The reasons for the Bill of Rights

  27. Perspectives of both the Anti-Federalists and Federalist

  28. Reasons for the structure of the U.S. government under the Constitution

KEY SKILLS


Students should be able to do:

  1. AH1.H.1.1.2 Interpret data presented in time lines and create time lines

  2. AH1.H.1.2.3 Analyze data in historical maps

  3. AH1.H.1.2.4 Analyze visual, literary and musical sources

  4. AH1.H.1.3.1 Identify issues and problems in the past

  5. AH1.H.1.3.2 Consider multiple perspectives of various peoples in the past.

  6. AH1.H.1.3.3 Analyze cause-and-effect relationships and multiple causation.

  7. AH1.H.1.3.4 Evaluate competing historical narratives and debates among historians.

  8. AH1.H.1.3.5 Evaluate the influence of the past on contemporary issues.

  9. AH1.H.1.4.3 Obtain historical data from a variety of sources

  10. AH1.H.1.4.4 Support interpretations with historical evidence

  11. CC Hist/SS Lit Stand: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

  12. CC Hist/SS Lit Stand: Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

  13. CC Hist/SS Lit Stand: Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

  14. CC Hist/SS Lit Stand: Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

  15. CC Hist/SS Lit Stand: Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

  16. CC Hist/SS Lit Stand: Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.




PERFORMANCE TASK (S)



WHAT?:

England, along with several other nations around the globe, has charged the American colonists with treason and willful and deliberate intention to break contracts with financial investors, the King and the government of the Mother Country. You are an attorney who is preparing to deliver the closing argument to the jury selected to determine if the colonists indeed breached contracts with the parties involved and if the protests and ultimate rebellion of the American colonists were justified.



WHY?:

  • In order to understand that individuals and groups may feel justified to protest and rebel against a government when it no longer demonstrates the will or ability to protect and serve its citizens.

  • In order to understand that a nation’s government and its political leaders often assume more authority during periods of conflict, rebellion or warfare.



HOW?:

As a lead defense attorney, your job will be to defend the “rebellious” actions of the American colonists during the era between the ending of the French and Indian War and the final establishment of the United States government, in a powerful closing argument. Detail your evidence, provide data to support your claims and use visual images, charts and graphs to emphasize your arguments. Summarize your closing argument with a powerful statement or quote that will serve as an emotional clincher in your request that the jury find the American colonists justified on all counts against them.


The charges against the American colonists are as follows:

  • The colonists committed treasonous acts of rebellion with protests, boycotts, secret committees, petitions to the King, refusal to abide by the laws of the English crown, etc.

  • The colonists committee crimes against the English government by refusing to obey and follow the laws passed by Parliament, pay taxes due to the crown, follow the authority of the royal governors and representatives of the crown sent to govern in the colonies.

  • The colonists committee crimes against English authority by committing such as acts as smuggling, negotiating, trading and selling with the native American Indians, the French, and others who were in competition with the crown for export and trade.

  • The colonists failed to perform their duties as British subjects when they refused to quarter soldiers within their homes.



  • Performance Task Criteria

  • Content: The written argument reflects thorough and accurate research of the historical events.

  • The concepts of identity and profit are clearly portrayed as major catalysts and facilitators of outcomes behind decisions made and events that evolved to lead to the final call for independence and the ultimate development of a new nation known as the United States.

  • The oral delivery of the closing argument shows accurate interpretation of historical data. The argument is reasons and the conclusions drawn use historical evidence collected from a variety of sources.




  • Process

  • The closing argument flows logically from a written outline prepared by the student.

  • The closing argument is reasonable based on the historical interpretations and perspectives of events, people and decisions occurring between the colonists and England during the established time period.

  • The visual evidences used to provide support present accurate representations.

  • Any slides or images are easy to read and understand.

  • Any primary documents used to support the points of the closing arguments are appropriate choices for each argument being made.

  • Any data used is presented in clear formatted tables or charts and display the user’s ability to select and use appropriate and accurate data as well as the ability to cite source.


Note: Use any rubric to design and organize criteria by which to evaluate the closing argument.






Content/Process Elements for the Performance


Possible Points or %

(Final Numbers = 100)

Self--‐Assessment

(Final Numbers = 100)

Teacher

Assessment

(Final Numbers = 100)

SCORING

GUIDE
A=93-100,

B=92-85,

C=84-77,

D=76-70,

F=69 & below


The Content Elements

  • Content: The written argument reflects thorough and accurate research of the historical events.




  • The concepts of identity and profit are clearly portrayed as major catalysts and facilitators of outcomes behind decisions made and events that evolved to lead to the final call for independence and the ultimate development of a new nation known as the United States.




  • The oral delivery of the closing argument shows accurate interpretation of historical data. The argument is reasons and the conclusions drawn use historical evidence collected from a variety of sources. The final conclusions provoke deeper thinking and reflection about how the events, actions and decisions of both the politics and economics played a significant role in propelling the American colonists toward demanding independence and forming their own government to rule the new nation once independence was won.


The Process Elements

  • The closing argument flows logically from a written outline prepared by the student.




  • The closing argument is reasonable based on the historical interpretations and perspectives of events, people and decisions occurring between the colonists and England during the established time period.




  • The visual evidences used to provide support present accurate representations.




  • Any slides or images are easy to read and understand.




  • Any primary documents used to support the points of the closing arguments are appropriate choices for each argument being made.




  • Any data used is presented in clear formatted tables or charts and display the user’s ability to select and use appropriate and accurate data as well as the ability to cite source.





25
10
25

10

10
10

5


5








LEARNING EXPERIENCES

Suggested Learning Experiences

Generalizations

Know

(The numbers

Refer back to the Critical

Content section of unit.)



Key Skills

(The numbers Refer back to The Key Skills

Section of this unit.)


  • Briefly research the purpose of a closing argument in a trial.




  • View some dynamic closing arguments and analyze key components such as tone, use of persuasion.




  • View some dynamic closing arguments and interpret words and phrases as they are used in a the arguments, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.




  • Use primary and secondary source documents and be able to determine the central ideas or information of those primary or secondary sources while making an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.




  • Create a graphic organizer to show cause and effect relationships between the actions and decisions of the English government officials in the colonies and the final rights established in the Bill of Rights.




  • Work with a partner to create cause and effect charts that show the flow of events and decisions (immediate and long-term) that occurred as a result of the rules and laws handed down to the colonists in America.




  • Practice listing pros and cons of various situations and Acts in the American colonies.




  • Writer a justification highlighting reasons why the colonists should have been allowed to freely rule themselves by the early 1700s.

  • Write a persuasive argument.




  • Use the lens of profit to reflect on two or more consequences of both European exploration and American colonization.




  • Use the lens of identity to reflect on two or more reasons why the American colonists were justified in their position that they no longer identified themselves as English subjects.




  • Analyze historical artifacts and images of the time period beings studies as a way to extract information and draw conclusions.




  • Use data from the time period being studies to draw conclusions.




  • With a partner work on putting data into a presentable format (table, chart or graph).




  • Work with timelines to determine chronology and accurate flow of events.










TEACHER

RESOURCES

AND

NOTES



Resources:

Approved print or web based resources for the course

Supplemental textbooks and resource materials

Internet


Magazines and other periodicals

Teacher Designed or approved Webquest


Teacher Notes:

By the time this unit is taught students should have been taught certain skills that will be needed to be successful with the learning experiences.


Make sure that you have taught students how to:

•Know the difference between primary and secondary sources.

•Analyze primary and secondary source documents to interpret historical meaning and perspective.

•Write a persuasive argument and essay.





The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page