Unit 7--big Ideas American History I civil Crisis and Civil War Text Reading—Lapsanski, et al



Download 17.42 Kb.
Date conversion03.05.2016
Size17.42 Kb.

Unit 7--Big Ideas-- American History I

Civil Crisis and Civil War


Text Reading—Lapsanski, et. al. United States History

Chapter 10-The Union in Crisis (1846-1861)

Chapter 11-The Civil War (1861-1865)
Learner Objectives
Students will understand that

  • A government founded on the division of power and authority may endure internal and external debates that can lead to conflict and/or compromise.

  • The power to govern in a democratic system is divided among different groups which, at times, are at odds with each other over how to best govern.

  • The distribution of power and authority may change during times of tension and conflict.

  • Governmental policies and actions that promote national growth and expansion can create sectional tension and political debate.

  • A nation’s economic development often varies by region which often leads to sectional interests.

  • While a nation’s economic policies may encourage national growth, these policies may also lead to sectional tensions.

  • Leaders can modify the institutions of government in response to the challenges of their time.

  • Wars and their outcomes are often unsettling and have enduring international consequences for nations and civilians

  • A nation’s government and its political leaders often assume more authority during periods of conflict, rebellion or warfare.

  • An individual or group’s perceptions of themselves, their country, and their place within a society may be influenced by times of prosperity and crisis.


Students will know

  • How and to what extent the westward expansion of the United States influenced the spread of slavery.

  • How and to what extent the national government’s economic policy on behalf of a national bank and tariffs, contributed to sectional tension and state’s rights debates leading up to the Civil War.

  • How and why the nation’s territorial expansion westward and its belief in Manifest Destiny had both national and sectional economic consequences.

  • How and to what extent the Underground Railroad influenced the migration of slaves to free communities in the North before the Civil War.

  • How and why national economic panics originated and impacted the political, social and cultural development of the United States. (e.g., 1857)

  • How differences in opinion over the power and authority of the national government led to the creation, development, and evolution of American political parties and their platforms.

  • How United States presidents and their administrations encountered specific internal and external conflicts (e.g., James Buchanan, Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Johnson)

  • How and why certain presidential campaigns and elections significantly changed American politics and society (e.g., Election of 1860)

  • How, why, and to what extent executive, judicial and legislative decisions may have increased sectional tension within the United States (e.g., the Compromise of 1850, the Fugitive Slave Act, the Kansas-Nebraska Act and the Dred Scott decision).

  • How, why, and to what extent executive, judicial and legislative decisions may have increased the power and authority of the federal government (e.g., Lincoln’s suspension of Habeas Corpus, the Emancipation Proclamation, Radical Reconstruction, Compromise of 1877)

  • How and to what extent the failure of political compromises over the expansion of slavery contributed to the onset of the Civil War.

  • How, why and to what extent the wartime leadership of Abraham Lincoln secured the authority of the national government and increased the power of the U.S. Presidency.

  • How, why and the extent to which American wars through Reconstruction effected national power, foreign policy, international affairs and relationships.

  • How and to what extent the secession of southern states impacted congress and the development of federal policies during the Civil War and Reconstruction.

  • How, why and to what extent the Civil War and Reconstruction strengthened the power and authority of the national government over the states.

  • How the United States Civil War impacted the economies of the northern, southern and western states.

  • How and why the mobilization, devastation and outcome of the United States Civil War impacted northern, southern and western societies and culture.

  • How the battles of the Civil War and the movement of Confederate and Union troops along southern battlefields impacted southern communities.

Students will be able to

  • Analyze primary and secondary sources to determine how southerners and politicians defended state’s rights, slavery, and the idea of nullification at times of sectional tension and political debate (e.g., John C. Calhoun)

  • Analyze primary and secondary sources to determine how politicians defended nationalism and compromise in terms of unity and national security (e.g., Daniel Webster and Henry Clay).


Essential Questions:

  1. How did political, economic, and social differences develop into a sectional split between the North and the South?

  2. To what extent did the expansion of slavery become the deciding factor in instituting a Civil War?

  3. How was the concept of union debated leading up to the Civil War? What did a federal union of states mean politically and socially before and after the Civil War?

  4. To what extent was the Union better equipped to win the war? How and why did the Union win the war?

  5. How did the federal government become more powerful during and after the Civil War?

  6. To what extent have the issues surrounding the civil war yet to be resolved?


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page