Unit 5: Crisis and Change Lesson E: Economic Depression and Political Collapse



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Unit 5: Crisis and Change

Lesson E: Economic Depression and Political Collapse

Lesson Draft Completed Template



Lesson Overview
Lesson Overview

The Great Depression resulted in huge drops in industrial production and stock market share prices. Many considered the Great Depression to be a sign of the failure of capitalism. The interdependent global economy that had been built following World War I splintered as governments across the globe sought to protect their respective countries from the effects of the Great Depression. Governments scrambled to retain revenues and support their citizens. Citizens everywhere suffered personal losses of all kinds and endured long periods of unemployment. Banks and companies around the world failed. The beginning of the Great Depression and the beginning of recovery from economic depression were different for different nations, but, for most, the Great Depression started around 1929 and lasted well into the late 1930s or even into the 1940s and the beginning of World War II.


Developer note: number key questions
Key Questions

How did the conflicts and crises of the first half of the 20th century become global in nature?

How did the conflicts and crises of the first half of the 20th century impact the world?

How did the conflicts and crises of the first half of the 20th century reshape political and economic global power structures?


Developer note: number student outcomes
Student Outcomes

Analyze the financial, economic, and social causes of the Depression and why it spread to most parts of the world.

Assess the human costs of the Depression and compare its impact on the economies and societies in different countries, including its impact on colonial peoples of Africa and Asia.

Analyze how the Depression contributed to the growth of socialist and communist movements and how it affected capitalist economic theory and practice in capitalist nations.

Describe how governments, businesses, social groups, families, and individuals addressed the hardships of the Depression.

Explain how the Soviet Union was able to become an industrial power and progress economically during the Depression.

Assess the impact of the Great Depression on the rise of authoritarian regimes in Europe, Asia, and Latin America.

Formulate historical questions.

Interrogate historical data.

Identify the gaps in the available records; marshal contextual knowledge and perspectives of the time and place.

Support interpretations with historical evidence.
Developer note: bullet the following key terms

Key Terms
balance of international trade

depression

free market

gold standard

Gross Domestic Product (GDP)

import substitution

interest rates

interventionism

personal income

populism

price

profit

reparations

supply and demand

tariff

tax revenue

unemployment rate

welfare
Student Resources

Blank World Map

Responses to the Great Depression

Responses to the Great Depression Graphic Organizer

Great Depression Brief Constructed Response (BCR)
Chart of Activities

Pre-Assessment 10 minutes

Key Terms 10 minutes

Activator: The World in Depression – 1929-1936 15 minutes

Opening: Economic Principles and Their Relevance to Citizens 15 minutes

Activity 1: Economic Responses 15 minutes

Activity 2: Causes of the Great Depression 20 minutes

Activity 3: Comparing Capitalism and Marxism 25 minutes

Activity 4: Impacts and Choices around the World 10 minutes

Activity 5: The Gold Standard 10 minutes

Activity 6: Responses to the Great Depression 30 minutes

Activity 7: The Great Depression and World War II 10 minutes

Activity 8: Causes and Effects of Great Depression: Discussion 20 minutes

Review and Assessment: Evaluating Causes and Effects of Great Depression 20 minutes

Lesson Summary 5 minutes
Time: approximately 215 minutes
Pre-Assessment
Directions: Analyze the following terms from the Great Depression. Decide whether each description is a cause, an effect, or both a cause and effect of the Great Depression and place it into the appropriate column.

Development note: Create this using inline quiz features. Three Column Drag and Drop. Labels are Causes, Effects, and Both. Note – this same quiz will be used later in this lesson.


THIS IS NOT BEING DEVELOPED IN ARTICULATE!!


  • anti-colonial protests

  • export dependency

  • fascism

  • financial instability

  • import substitution

  • labor strikes

  • mechanization

  • national welfare programs

  • price drops on consumer goods

  • protectionism

  • reparations payments (WWI)

  • skewed income distributions

  • the gold standard

  • the stock market crash

  • war debts (WWI)

Correct Answer:



Causes:

  • agricultural overproduction

  • export dependency

  • financial instability

  • mechanization

  • reparations payments

  • skewed income distributions

  • the gold standard

  • the stock market crash

  • war debts




Both Causes and Effects:

  • protectionism




Effects:

  • anti-colonial protests

  • fascism

  • import substitution

  • labor strikes

  • national welfare programs

  • price drops on consumer goods



Key Terms

Developer note: see overview page


Activator: The World in Depression 1929-1936
Select each continent to preview some of the events you will learn about in this lesson. Discuss the questions that follow as directed by your teacher.

[MapIcon.png: 32x32]
South America: 1930 CE – A military junta took control in Brazil with Getúlio Vargas, “father of the poor,” at the head. The Brazilian Revolution of 1930 reflected dissatisfaction with the old oligarchies. The price of coffee, Brazil’s main export, fell sharply. Shown here is Vargas, center, Provisional President of Brazil.
This image from http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Revolução_de_1930_-_2.jpg is in the public domain.
North America: 1929 CE – The U.S. stock market crashed on “Black Tuesday,” October 24. In 1932, President Franklin D. Roosevelt initiated the “New Deal” program to provide relief and stimulate recovery. Shown here is a crowd gathering outside the Stock Exchange after the 1929 crash.
This image from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Crowd_outside_nyse.jpg is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States Federal Government under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code.
Europe: 1932-1933 CE: – The confiscation of grain and other foodstuffs by the government of the Soviet Union during the collectivization of farms caused a famine that affected more than 40 million people. While estimates of the number of deaths vary, they are usually in the millions. Shown here is a child affected by the famine.
This image from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Child_affected_by_malnutrition_1921-1923_Famine_in_Soviet_Russia.jpg is in the public domain.
Asia: 1930 CE - Mohandas (Mahatma) Gandhi led the Salt March to Dandi in protest of the British tax on salt as shown here.
This image from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Marche_sel.jpg is in the public domain.
Australia: 1930s CE: After the stock market crash, unemployment in Australia more than doubled to 21% in mid-1930, and reached its peak in mid-1932, when almost 32% of Australians were out of work. Shown here are children lining up for a free soup and bread during the Depression circa 1932.

This image from http://www.migrationheritage.nsw.gov.au/exhibitions/objectsthroughtime/ objects/starvation/ is in the public domain.


Note to Nate – Third picture down
Africa: 1935 CE: South Africa’s agriculture and mineral exports fell drastically. Lack of demand destroyed prices, and the price of wood fell 75% between 1925 and 1933. The gold mining industry saved the nation from a complete collapse because the price of gold rose rapidly. Shown here are gold miners.
This image from http://loc.gov/pictures/resource/cph.3a40984/ is in the public domain.

Development note: insert hybid, discussion, and link icon; link to Discussion Scoring Tool



Classroom Activity:

Discussion – Great Depression:  Prepare a response to the discussion question below. Follow your teacher’s directions to participate in your class discussion.


  • How do the events listed from the period 1921-1936 relate to the impact of the Great Depression on the nations of the world?



Select the link to review the Discussion Scoring Tool.



Opening: Economic Principles and their Relevance to Citizens

This photograph is synonymous with poverty, and it is one of the most iconic images in the world. It represents both the Great Depression and the additional devastation of the Dust Bowl in the United States.


This image from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Lange-MigrantMother02.jpg is in the public domain.
Caption: Migrant Mother
In this activity, you will review and learn about economic principles and the relationship between the actions of governments, businesses, and individuals, and how the decisions made can lead to or aggravate economic problems.
Development note: insert video icon and link to ppt Economic Principles
When you are ready, select the play button to learn about Economic Principles Behind the Great Depression and Their Relevance to Citizens.
HTML Development Note: Please develop as an inline quiz using the quiz tool – matching question.
Directions: Match the following terms to their definitions. Print out a copy of the correct answers to add to your notebook. These concepts will be important for understanding the discussion of the economic and personal implications of the Great Depression presented in this lesson.


  1. balance of international trade

  2. gold standard

  3. gross domestic product

  4. personal income

  5. price

  6. profit

  7. tax revenue

  8. unemployment rate

  1. the excess of visible exports over visible imports

  1. the system by which a country gives gold in exchange for any of its currency when demanded

  1. the monetary value of all goods and services produced in a given year

  1. the salary or wages that workers receive for their labor and/or nonwage benefits (insurance and paid time off)

  1. the amount, as of money or goods, asked for or given in exchange for something else

  1. the amount received for a commodity or service in excess of the original cost

  1. government income due to taxation

  1. the percentage of the workforce looking for work but not finding it


Activity 1: Economic Responses
Directions: Use your understanding of the economic terms you just reviewed to respond to the three scenarios. Each scenario will provide a backdrop of the economic health of a country. Your task is to determine the implications or consequences for the average working family. Be prepared to discuss your answers.
Custom Flash Development: filename will be u5le_countrytone.swf

Development Note: Heather, develop this like the other tone thermometers.



Screen 1
Title:

Play Button


Screen 2
Scenario 1

Country A is on the gold standard. Prices are low and, therefore, profits are also low. The balance of trade is slightly lower than it has been. The gross domestic product shows negative growth, and the government has increased taxes to offset losses. Unemployment is at 5%.


Use the thermometer below to indicate the impact on the average family’s standard of living and personal income.
not affected moderately affected severely affected

Correct Answer: moderately affected

Feedback: Correct or Incorrect
Next Button
Screen 3
Scenario 2

Country B is on the gold standard and is an export-dependent country. Prices are low and profits are also low. The balance of trade is much lower than it has been. The gross domestic product shows negative growth, and the government has increased taxes to off-set losses. Unemployment is up to 25%.


Use the thermometer below to indicate the impact on the average family’s standard of living and personal income.

not affected moderately affected severely affected

Correct Answer: severely affected

Feedback: Correct or Incorrect


Next Button
Screen 4
Scenario 3

Country C is not on the gold standard. The balance of trade is slightly lower than it has been, but the government has been supporting domestic production of goods usually imported. Prices are low to help promote buying these local/domestic goods. The gross domestic product shows moderate growth. Unemployment is down by 5%.

Use the thermometer below to indicate the impact on the average family’s standard of living and personal income.

not affected moderately affected severely affected


Correct Answer: not affected

Feedback: Correct or Incorrect


End Flash Development:

Classroom Activity

Discussion: Solutions to the Economic Depression


Directions: Re-read the Country B scenario and then prepare a response to the discussion questions below. Follow your teacher’s directions to participate in your class discussion.

  • Country B is on the gold standard and is an export-dependent country. Prices are low and profits are also low. The balance of trade is much lower than it has been. The gross domestic product shows negative growth, and the government has increased taxes to off-set losses. Unemployment is up to 25%.




  • Now apply your understanding of these economic principles to propose a solution to the economic depression currently suffered by Country B. Propose what you think both government and individuals could do to improve conditions.

As you proceed through the lesson, you will be able to compare your response to the real responses of countries around the world.


Activity 2: Causes of the Great Depression

The Great Depression was a severe, international economic depression felt in the forms of huge drops in industrial production and stock market share prices, as well as major increases in bank failures and unemployment. The beginning of the Great Depression and the beginning of recovery from economic depression were different for different nations, but, for most, the Great Depression started around 1929 and lasted well into the late 1930s or even into the 1940s.


Development note: insert video icon; link to Causes of the Great Depression ppt

[VideoIcon.png: 32x32]
When you are ready, select the play button to learn about Causes of the Great Depression. As you view the presentation, you may wish to record information about the events that led to the Great Depression to use in the discussion that follows.

Answer the following questions in your notebook.


  • What were the events that led to the Great Depression?

  • How did each event contribute to the Great Depression?


Activity 3: Comparing Capitalism and Marxism
The decline in the United States manufacturing output, as well as the withdrawal of investment capital, affected people around the world. Those affected included Argentinean cattle ranchers, Australian woolgrowers, Brazilian coffee workers, British steel workers, Indonesian sugar producers, Japanese fishermen, Turkish tenant farmers, and West African cocoa pickers.
The decline in the United States economy pulled most other countries down into economic depression. However, internal conditions in each country determined how quickly and how well it recovered. Some countries were less affected, overall, than others.
Many considered the Great Depression to be a sign of the failure of capitalism. This point seemed to be made by the contrasting growth in economic production in the Marxist U.S.S.R.
Development note: insert video icon and link to Comparing Capitalism ppt
When you are ready, select the play button to learn about Comparing Capitalism and Marxism: Views from the U.S. and the U.S.S.R.

Classroom Activity

Discussion: Comparing Capitalism to Marxism


Directions: Prepare a response to the discussion questions below. Follow your teacher’s directions to participate in your class discussion.

  • How did the Great Depression contribute to the growth of communist movements?

  • What was the role of government in capitalist and Marxist countries during the Great Depression?

  • How was the Soviet Union able to progress economically during the Great Depression?



Select the link to review the Discussion Scoring Tool.



Activity 4: Impacts and Choices around the World

The interdependent global economy that had been built following World War I splintered as governments across the globe sought to protect their respective countries from the effects of the Great Depression.


International cooperation was largely abandoned as governments pursued moves of economic nationalism to increase revenues and lower unemployment rates. The most common courses of action included:

  • abandoning the gold standard,

  • devaluing currencies to make exports cheaper in foreign markets, and

  • charging tariffs on goods imported from other countries to attempt to protect domestic industries.

Interventionism became almost standard as governments attempted to regulate the economy to protect their national interests.

Directions: Use the blank to world map to summarize the actions taken in response to the Great Depression on different continents. Select the play button when you are ready to begin.
Download the Student Resource: Blank World Map (pdf).

Developer note: use the the map from http://www.eduplace.com/ss/maps/pdf/world_cont.pdf


Custom Flash Development: filename will be u5le_globaldepress.swf

Development Note: Heather, develop this using the blue world map from istock.


Screen 1

Title: Responses to the Great Depression

Play Button
Screen 2

Africa:

Interaction Notes: Heather – start by showing the world map – then zoom to Africa – which should be labeled. Have a boat land at Egypt. Label Egypt on the map and have a pop up that says "raised tariffs on imported goods." Next, have the boat go to South Africa and that should be labeled. Have a pop up appear that says "began racial segregation."


Script: Egypt raised tariffs on imported goods. South Africa instituted racial segregation, which eventually became a governmental policy of apartheid, in response to the economic crisis felt by white Afrikaners when agricultural and mining exports slumped. Nearly one-third of the Afrikaner population lived as paupers.
Next button
Screen 3

Asia:

Interaction Notes: Screen wipes clean and returns to the world map – then zoom to Asia – which should be labeled. Have a boat land at China. Label China on the map and have pop up that has two bullets that say “remained on silver standard” and "largely unaffected by Great Depression" Next, have the boat go to India and that should be labeled. Have a pop up appear that says "world agricultural prices drop and cut India’s income in half"


Script: China was on the silver standard and had been since 1914. As a result, the Chinese almost entirely avoided the Great Depression. Farmers in India found their incomes cut in half because of the fall in world agricultural prices and were forced to sell land and jewelry to pay bills.
Next button
Screen 4

Australia and Oceania:

Interaction Notes: Screen wipes clean and returns to the world map – then zoom to Australia and Oceania – which should be labeled. Have a boat land at Australia. Label Australia on the map and have pop up say "one of hardest hit countries" and “29% unemployment”. Next, have the boat go to Indonesia and that should be labeled. Have a pop up appear that says "sugar prices drop sharply."


Script: Australia was one of the hardest-hit countries in the world because of its dependence on agricultural and industrial exports. Incidents of civil unrest became common because of falling wages and record high unemployment (29%) in 1932. Indonesia’s sugar prices dropped sharply.
Next button
Screen 5

South America:

Interaction Notes: Screen wipes clean and returns to the world map – then zoom to South America – which should be labeled. Have a boat land at Colombia and one at Peru. Label both on the map and have a pop up that says "raised tariffs on imported goods". Next, have the boat go to Bolivia and one to Peru and those should be labeled. Have a pop up appear that says "lack of U.S. investments destroys economy" for each. Last, have the boat go to Argentina and label it. Have a pop up that says “beef prices drop sharply”.


Script: All Latin American economies were damaged because of dependence on the U.S. Colombia and Peru raised tariffs on imported goods. Bolivia and Peru were affected particularly badly because of high levels of previous U.S. investment. The price of Argentina’s beef dropped sharply.
Next button
Screen 6

North America:

Interaction Notes: Screen wipes clean and returns to the world map – then zoom to North America – which should be labeled. Have a boat land at Mexico. Label Mexico on the map and have a pop up that says "government seizes petroleum companies".


Script: Mexican President Lázaro Cárdenas issued a decree that the petroleum companies were in rebellion against the government and took possession of them. In 1936, the government redistributed land to peasants, supported unions, and made great changes to public education.
Next button
Screen 7

Europe:

Interaction Notes: Screen wipes clean and returns to the world map – then zoom to Europe – which should be labeled. Have boats land in France, Belgium, Switzerland and Poland. Label each on the map and have a pop up that says "”gold bloc’ country”" for each. Next, have the boat go to Sweden and that should be labeled. Have a pop up appear that says "raised tariffs on imports after abandoning gold standard."


Script: France, Belgium, Switzerland, and Poland – the “gold bloc” countries, stayed on the gold standard until 1936. Sweden abandoned the gold standard early and raised tariffs on imported goods. Social democrats seized government control in 1932 based on policies for strong interventionism and a welfare state.
End Flash Development
Activity 5: The Gold Standard

Now study the chart explaining when various countries left the gold standard and the graph comparing global exports during the years of the Great Depression to previous years. Use the information from the world map and these two data sources to answer the following questions. Look at the feedback carefully to confirm your understanding of this content.


Development Notes: Please insert the following images side by side with zoom options on both.
This image from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:International_depression.png is licensed under the Creative Commons Atrribution-ShareAlike License. Attribution: Will O'Neil.
Caption: The Great Depression in international perspective. Red ticks mark points at which nations suspended gold convertibility and/or devalued against gold.
Source: This image from http://worldhistoryforusall.sdsu.edu/eras/era8.php

is free to use for non-profit/educational purposes.

Note to Nate: The image is in the ppt at the bottom of the page.
Caption: Value of Global Exports in Billions of Dollars
Development Note: Using inline quiz questions please develop the following using short answer with custom feedback.
Directions: Using the information from the data sources and the map of the world, answer the following short answer questions. Pay close attention to the feedback to confirm your understanding of the affects of the Great Depression and the responses in different countries.
What was the desired outcome of individual countries placing tariffs on imported goods and dropping prices on exported goods?

insert text box


Feedback: The U.S. and other countries imposed high tariffs to try and protect their domestic products in the competitive market against imports. Nations dropped prices on their exports to make their products more competitive for importing by other nations.
What was the desired outcome of leaving the gold standard?

insert text box


Feedback: The desired outcome of leaving the gold standard was to devalue currency and make prices on a nation’s goods more affordable for citizens and for exporting as well.
Why were countries like Belgium and Poland called “gold bloc” countries?

insert text box


Feedback: These countries were called the “gold bloc” countries because they stayed on the gold standard until much later than other countries (1936).
What was the impact of the Great Depression on China?

insert text box


Feedback: China was on the silver standard, not the gold, and remained isolated from the world economy. The Great Depression had very little impact on China.
What was the impact of the Great Depression on Mexico?

insert text box


Feedback: The government took possession of petroleum companies. In 1936, the government redistributed land to peasants, supported unions, and made great changes to public education.
What was the impact of the Great Depression on South American countries?

insert text box


Feedback: All Latin American economies were severely damaged by the Great Depression because of high levels of U.S. investment. Bolivia, Chile, and Peru were affected particularly adversely.
What was the impact of the Great Depression on Australia?

insert text box


Feedback: An export-dependent country, Australia was one of the hardest hit. It also suffered lots of civil unrest and record high unemployment.
Development note: insert hybrid, discussion, and link icon; link to discussion scoring tool

Classroom Activity


Discussion: Impact of the Great Depression

Directions:  Prepare a response to the discussion questions below. Follow your teacher’s directions to participate in your class discussion.


  • Which nation’s story do you find the most compelling, and why?

  • What is the significance of the gold standard in terms of this nation’s recovery from the Great Depression?



Select the link to review the Discussion Scoring Tool.



Activity 6: Responses to the Great Depression

What were some of the ways ordinary people dealt with the Great Depression?


When you are ready, select the play button to learn about Public Perception and Nationalist Responses to the Great Depression.

Classroom Activity

Jigsaw – Responses to the Great Depression

Directions: In this activity, you will complete a jigsaw activity to review the Responses to the Great Depression: Snapshots of Nations Chart. As you read, look for patterns across these nations in terms of both the realities faced during the Great Depression and the responses of people and governments to the Great Depression.

Next, your teacher will provide instructions to work in groups to review the case studies of four nations -- Canada, Chile, Japan, and New Zealand -- and the responses of these countries to the effects of the Great Depression. Take notes on your assigned case study noting both how the nation was challenged and the responses made to the challenges of the Great Depression. Your teacher may assign additional research about these nations.

Follow your teacher's directions to complete the jigsaw activity. After completing the assignment, prepare for discussion.

Download the Student Resource: Responses to the Great Depression – Snapshots of Nations Chart (pdf)

Download the Student Resource: Responses to the Great Depression Jigsaw (pdf)

Download the Student Resource: Responses to the Great Depression Graphic Organizer (doc).

Discussion: Comparing Capitalism to Marxism


Directions: Prepare a response to the discussion questions below. Follow your teacher’s directions to participate in your class discussion.

Think about what you have learned about welfare efforts in Germany, New Zealand, the United States, and other countries as a response to the unemployment and general poverty created by the Great Depression.

Think back to your writing from Activity 1 about what both government and individuals could do to improve conditions.


  • What is the role of government in response to national and international financial catastrophe?

  • Is an event like the Great Depression the time for small government or for big government in the form of social programs? .


Select the link to review the Discussion Scoring Tool.


Activity 7: The Great Depression and World War II
Development Note: Insert image and right align

Caption: Midwest factory workers assembled 37mm ammunition.


This image from http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Women_aluminum_shells_ wwii.jpg is a work of the United States Government and therefore in the public domain.
The beginning of World War II was one of the most important factors in ending the recession that caused the Great Depression. At the very least, the money that Japan, the U.S.S.R., and other nations around the world spent starting in 1937 on rearmament and war efforts accelerated economic recovery and also reduced unemployment.
The United States, of course, did not officially enter the war until 1941. Following the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, the huge government war spending raised economic growth rates, increased industrial output by 100%, and reduced unemployment almost to zero. United States entry into World War II ended most of the country’s lingering problems caused by the Great Depression.
In a sense, World War II offered a bittersweet end to the Great Depression. World War II led to greater demand for goods and also allowed export-dependent countries to demand higher prices for raw materials and agricultural products. Countries around the world saw large GDP increases compared to pre-Depression levels, including Egypt (20%), Indonesia (16%), and Mexico (25%). Of course, these economic gains were not without other costs and losses.
As important as all of these national economic figures are, they fail to give a complete picture of the hardships that individuals experienced during the Great Depression. The historical realities of men and women around the world are still areas of research for historians. Some of these new research areas include looking at birth rates and marriage rates, and even participation in religious events, such as the Muslim hajj or pilgrimage to Mecca, during the years of the Great Depression. Other researchers are exploring correspondence and diaries to understand the personal impact of the Great Depression.
Directions: Now, review the Causes and Effects of the Great Depression by sorting the listed concepts into Causes and Effects.
Development note: Embed the same pre-assessment inline three column sort quiz.
Activity 8: Causes and Effects of Great Depression

Historian John A. Garraty has written that the Great Depression was “a worldwide phenomenon composed of an infinite number of separate but related events.”


Classroom Activity


Discussion: The Great Depression
Directions: Think about the stock market crash, export dependency, the gold standard, various tariffs and protectionist responses, war debts and reparations, and welfare programs as you prepare your responses to the following questions. Be sure to support you answers with historical evidence.


  • What do you consider the most significant cause of the Great Depression?

  • What do you consider the most significant effect?


Select the link to review the Discussion Scoring Tool.




Review and Assessment: Evaluating Causes and Effects of the Great Depression

Review

The Great Depression resulted in huge drops in industrial production and stock market share prices. Many considered the Great Depression to be a sign of the failure of capitalism. The interdependent global economy that had been built following World War I splintered as governments across the globe sought to protect their respective countries from the effects of the Great Depression. Governments scrambled to retain revenues and support their citizens. Citizens everywhere suffered personal losses of all kinds and endured long periods of unemployment. Banks and companies around the world failed. The beginning of the Great Depression and the beginning of recovery from economic depression were different for different nations, but, for most, the Great Depression started around 1929 and lasted well into the late 1930s or even into the 1940s and the beginning of World War II.

Development Note: Insert Quiz Icon and link to lesson pre-assessment.
Select the link to review the pre-assessment prior to completing the lesson assessment.

Assessment

Review the class discussion from the previous activity and your notes and work from this lesson. In a few well-constructed paragraphs, respond to the following BCR prompt.



Brief Constructed Response

Great Depression

What were the causes of the Great Depression and how did they affect the world?



  • Identify two causes of the Great Depression and explain how these events affected the world.

  • Identify two significant effects of the Great Depression and explain the impact in one or more countries.

  • Include details and examples to support your answer.

Download the Student Resource: Great Depression Brief Constructed Response (BCR).




Select the link to review the Social Studies Rubric.

Submit the completed BCR to your teacher as instructed.
Lesson Summary

Now you know:

bulleted list of key questions from the lesson goes here.

Congratulations! You have successfully completed the lesson .</p> <br /> <br /><div> <br />Sue Spencer <p>Page of </p> <br /></div>



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