Unit 3 Heritage: Life in a Colonial Town Lesson Plan Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5



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Unit 3 Heritage: Life in a Colonial Town Lesson Plan
Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5

Word Knowledge:

Synonyms


Suffix “ment’ and “ant’

Suffix “tion”

Compound words


Word Knowledge:

Sentences



Daily Oral Language:

Sentence Stems



Review Vocabulary:

Word Chat




Review Vocabulary:


Build Background

Selection Vocabulary

1st Read

Life in a Colonial Town Pg. 2 to 7

Strategies: Predicting, Asking Questions, determining main idea and details

1st Read

Life in a Colonial Town Pg. 8 to 15

Strategies: Predicting, Asking Questions, determining main idea and details

1st Read

Life in a Colonial Town Pg. 16 to 21

Strategies: Predicting, Asking Questions, determining main idea and details

1st Read

Life in a Colonial Town Pg. 22 to 30

Strategies: Predicting, Asking Questions, determining main idea and details

Lesson Assessment:

Standard – based benchmark questions for expository text



Inquiry

Primary Source:

Colonial Map by John Smith 7.15 Primary Sources in the Classroom




Inquiry

Primary Source: Diary of a Woman in colonial times
Skills: Drawing Conclusions

Inquiry

Primary Source: Slavery

Skills: Drawing Conclusions

Inquiry

Primary Source:

Primer
Skills: Drawing Conclusions



Inquiry

Relating to Heritage Theme –Difference b/w information from primary sources and secondary sources.



Spelling and Grammar:

Silent letters & pronouns



Spelling and Grammar:

Silent letters & pronouns



Spelling and Grammar:

Silent letters & pronouns



Spelling and Grammar:

Silent letters & pronouns



Spelling and Grammar:

Silent letters & pronouns



Writing:

Mini lesson:

Writer’s Craft: Figurative Language 1.4 TE 277H

LAH 286-289

CWB 94-95


Writing: Description of a part of one aspect of colonial heritage – Circle map


Writing:

Add opening and closing. Oral rehearse and begin draft by taking it off the map



Mini Lesson

Writer’s Craft: Figurative Language 1.4

Writing: draft complete.

Revise: Mini Lessons: Writing in your own words

Use of synonyms

Combining sentences Sentence Variety


Writing:

Edit and Rewrite




Lesson Plan Details
Green Section: Word Knowledge, Oral Language


diverse common conflict compromise

colonization plantation exploration revolution

settlement advertisement servant attendant

silversmith meetinghouse craftspeople wheelwright

Although the colonies were diverse in origin, there were many things that they had in common.

Native Americans and colonists had many conflicts over land but compromise also took place in order to live in peace.

After exploration by Europeans, colonization along the coast of America began.

Craftspeople, like silversmiths, wheelwrights, and blacksmiths, were necessary to the livelihood of a colony.




Day 1

About the words

Line 1: Antonyms (1.3)

Line 2: words having the suffix “tion” – all nouns 1.4

Line 3: words having the suffix “ment” are things; “ant” are nouns that are persons 1.4

Line 4: compound words – can you figure out what the words mean by their 2 parts? 1.4

Day 2

About the sentences: Read and review sentences – notice that the suffixes determine the word type and correct syntax is needed.
Day 3

Developing Oral Language: Using the following sentence stems, students complete the sentences.

The settlement was surrounded by a wall because …

Colonization was developed along the coast because ….

Craftspeople had to have skills because…

Some of the diverse groups in a colony were …
Day 4

Word Chat with Selection vocabulary

necessary: If it is necessary, put your thumb up. If it is not necessary, put your thumb down.

The doctor says I need to have an operation.

There is a party that I have the option to attend.

The colonist used the outhouse in the middle of the night.


apprentice: If it is an apprentice, put your thumb up. If it is not an apprentice, put your thumb down.

A person is paid for working at McDonalds.

A young man watches the wheelwright to learn how to fix the wheel.

The boy set the type just like Ben Franklin at the printing press.


Colonists: If it is colonists put your thumb up. If it is not colonists, put your thumb down.

The man and his family helped to start a new town in America.

The woman and her children moved from the farm to a new city.

The astronauts began a new city on the moon.



Day 1

Building Background and Activating Prior Knowledge:

2.2 Using the timeline on pg. 4-5 Review the events leading up to colonization of America. Review pg. 5: the map to understand the New England, Middle and Southern Colonies.
Clues, Problems, and Wonderings:

2.1 Teach Global contextual clues of Expository Text: Title, Table of Contents, Chapter Headings, pictures and captions, photos, graphs, charts, labels, glossary and index to assist the student in comprehending the text.
Review the table of contents and determine how the text is organized (Create the Tree Map)


Life in a Colonial Town

Clothes and Shoes – limited and expensive, women/girls (long dresses, aprons, hats), men/boys (breeches, stockings, buttons, vests and jackets)


Making Clothes – wool (cut, carded, spun,thread, woven, cloth, sewn), dying wool,)





Children

Daily Life


Origin


Clothing

Food

Linguistic Patterns for clues: I think that this text describes a time of long ago because ____________________.

I think that it must have been a lot of work living in a colony because __________________________.
Linguistic Patterns for wonderings:

I wonder what some of the (customs, traditions) of colony life were. (theme connection)

I wonder how this relates to our unit on heritage?
Selection Vocabulary

colonists: people who live and work in a colony

necessary: an outside toilet

apprentice: someone who, while working for the expert, is learning a trade (or job)

primer: a book used to teach young children to read, typically containing simple stories and alphabets

carded: brushing wool between 2 pieces of rough board to fluff it up
Word Challenge

Tell children that words can have more than one meaning. For example, necessary can mean “an outside toilet” or “essential - something needed to be done”



Literary Elements: Although plot (which is part of narrative) is the focus of week in OCR, you can introduce the idea of potential problems or conflicts that may have arisen during the colonial era (between slaves and owners, colonies and their mother countries, Native Americans and colonists, the environment and colonial progress). There are many places where you can predict these possibilities within Life in a Colonial Town or investigate them further with the primary sources.


First Read (4 days) (2nd read will happen as students reread to gather information (Main Idea and details) in order to describe colonial life, during their writing time. The skill – Drawing Conclusions- will be practiced with the primary sources.)

Focus Question: How were traditions maintained in a colony? How might these traditions cause conflict with Native Americans that had lived in the area or Africans who were enslaved in the colony?
Other: Relate to Heritage


Day 1: Pgs. 2- 7 –Visual Tool during Reading – Tree Map

Focus Question: Pg. 2-7 How were the colonies established?

Life in a Colonial Town

Clothes and Shoes – limited and expensive, women/girls (long dresses, aprons, hats), men/boys (breeches, stockings, buttons, vests and jackets)


Making Clothes – wool (cut, carded, spun,thread, woven, cloth, sewn), dying wool,)





Children


Daily Life


Origin
Colonial Times
Starting a Colony – work to be done (homes, meeting houses, planting, workshops)
A growing town/economy – communication with Europe, craftspeople, shops, trade/barter
Spreading the News – town crier, newspapers, post rider,


Clothing

Food





Day 1: Pgs. 2-7 Strategic Questions during Reading
Pg. 2-3 Discuss the table of contents and ask questions about it.

Asking Questions: How do you think heritage played a huge role for these people?
Pg. 4-5 Take some time to look over the map, timeline, etc. to develop knowledge of how colonies began. You may also look in your History textbook for building further background knowledge.
Pg. 6 Read the heading “Starting a Colony”.

Predict all that it might entail. What would some of the problems be in starting a town so far away from England?
Pg. 6 Asking Questions: How might Europe and the colonies become dependent upon each other?


Day 2: Pgs. 8 - 15

Focus Question: How were the people dependent upon each other in a colony?


Life in a Colonial Town

Clothes and Shoes – limited and expensive, women/girls (long dresses, aprons, hats), men/boys (breeches, stockings, buttons, vests and jackets)


Making Clothes – wool (cut, carded, spun,thread, woven, cloth, sewn), dying wool,)





Children



Daily Life
A growing town/economy – communication with Europe, craftspeople, shops, trade/barter
Spreading the News – town crier, newspapers, post rider
Houses – building materials, fireplace, toilet, wells, furniture
A Busy Day – tasks of men, women, blacksmiths, millers, cooper, slaves



Origin
Colonial Times
Starting a Colony – work to be done (homes, meeting houses, planting, workshops)
A growing town/economy – communication with Europe, craftspeople, shops, trade/barter
Spreading the News – town crier, newspapers, post rider,


Clothing

Food







Day 2: Pgs. 8 – 15: Strategic Questions during Reading

Pg. 8-9 Asking Questions: How were the craftspeople dependent on each other? (discuss how money was not used and the role of the different craftspeople)
Pg. 10-11 Predict: What other jobs were necessary for a colony to survive?

Asking Questions: (meta-cognition) I wonder how hard it might be to get news or important information on time? Why?

Asking Questions: Why were these different types of communication necessary for the colonies?


Pg. 12-13


Asking Questions: Wow! I wonder how hard it would be to use the necessary or gather water in the wintertime?

Predict: No baths, one or two sets of clothes, one room home, long winters…
Pg. 14-15 Asking Questions: How were the roles of men and women different? What was the role of the slaves in the colonies?



Day 3: Pg. 16 - 21

Focus Question: How did schooling reflect the colonial beliefs?





Day 3: Pgs. 16 – 21: Strategic Questions during Reading
Pg. 16-17 Asking Questions: What were the skills learned by boys? by girls? What does this say about colonial cultural values?
Pg. 18-19 Asking Questions: How might having to pay for education have affected different children (poor & wealthy)?
Pg. 20-21 Asking Questions: How did the Primer lessons reflect colonial culture and beliefs? (what parents and the church instilled in their children)




Day 4: Pgs. 22-30

Focus Question: How were colonists

Resourceful?





Day 3: Pgs. 22 – 30: Strategic Questions during Reading
Pg. 22-23 Asking Questions: How did the colonial dress reflect social class, cultural values, and natural resources?
Pg. 24-25 Asking Questions: How was cloth making a communal job in the colonies?
Pg. 26 – 27 Predict: What might happen if the weather was especially cold during the growing season?

Asking Questions: How did the colonists use their surroundings for food?

Predict: Why do you think the colonists had a larger meal in the middle of the day?
Pg. 28-29 What are some of the uses of fire for the colonists and why should it not burn out?

What is the purpose of the griddle? What must you do first before flipping the pancake?




Workshop Activities:

Pg. 24 use a flow map to show the steps in making woolen clothing.

Use a double bubble map to compare school today with colonial times.

Use a bubble map to describe a woman, man, child or slave in colonial times.


Practice Fluency Passages

Primary Source Fluency Activities: Early America

2 choices: Young Ben Franklin pg. 173- 174 (Groups can practice in parts as seen on pgs. 175 – 179

The Little Pilgrim pg. 35- with questions on pg. 36
Poem: Escaped Slave - Practice on your own or as a group and take parts.
Reader’s Theater

Indentured In America by Teacher Created Materials

Spelling

Silent letters 277J (you may want to use these words or the words from the selection for spelling.

Silent letters in Life in a Colonial Town: wheelwright, high, night, neighbor, rhymes, school, foreign, build, people, knee-length, clothes, sewn,

Grammar


See blue section 277F – 277J on possessive, reflexive, intensive, and indefinite pronouns

Use the Language Arts Handbook Pg. 344-345

A Grammar page using colonial words is included in the packet for teaching. (it matches TE 277G)


Writing: See New Martha Ballard Writing Lesson on Character Analysis:

Day 1 You can still do these figurative Language mini lessons and relate them to how you see them when describing a character or person. Mini lesson on Figurative language to use with description. Some types of figurative language to teach could be metaphors, similes, assonance, imagery, or symbolism. See TE 277H and the LAH 286-289 for more information. Students can practice using Comprehension and Lang. Arts WB pg. 94-95. Also, create some figurative language on Martha Ballard.
Similes: Martha Ballard worked like a ___________. (a dog, a horse, etc.)

Martha Ballard was as quick as _________.


Metaphor: Martha Ballard is a _______ (saint, etc.)

Day 3 and 4:
Mini lesson: Figurative Language practice:
Simile: The wheelwright worked as fast as ____________________.

You could tell from the advertisement that the slave owner was as angry as _______________________.

The colonial women worked as hard as _____________________.

Metaphor:

The slave was a ____________ in the home.



The silversmith was a ___________ in the community.


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