Understanding by Design Unit Template (Revised & adapted)



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Understanding by Design Unit Template

(Revised & adapted)


Title of Unit

History of United States and New York

Grade Level

4

Subject

Social Studies Unit 2

Time Frame

Mid Oct – Mid Jan (Finish by MLK)

Developed By







Stage 1 - Identify Desired Results

Narrative about this Unit of Study: (including the Big Idea)

Why are political systems important? Why do we need them? How have they adapted to change?

The unit focuses on the development of political systems from the consensus model of the Native American Indians of the Eastern Woodlands throughout history. With the arrival of the European Settlers interactions started and the political systems went through a change. How did the different groups adapt to the changes?

Learning Outcomes – Identified Primary Standards

What relevant goals will this unit address?





New York State Learning Standards for Social Studies:
Standard 1: History of the United States and New York

Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States and New York.


Standard 3: Geography

Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live – local, national, and global – including the distribution of people, places, and environments over Earth’s surface.








Understandings

What understandings about the big ideas implied in the PLOs are desired?



Essential Questions

What provocative questions will foster inquiry into the content?



Students will understand that...
(Reminder: The bolded standards are the main focus of the unit and need to be addressed. Others can be additional lessons to enhance students’ understanding.)
4.5 Native American groups, chiefly the Iroquois and the Algonquin, inhabited New York in the early period of its history. Native Americans had unique settlement patterns, and ways of interacting with the environment.


  • 4.5.a Native American groups made careful use of the physical environment as they migrated to and settled across New York.

  • 4.5.b Belief systems, ways of living, and social structures varied across Native American groups in New York and the United States.

  • 4.5.c Native American groups developed political practices that included a consensus model of decision making, and these practices influenced the development of United States democracy.

  • 4.5.d Native American communities made significant contributions to the development of the United States and New York.

4.6 The movement of Europeans and enslaved Africans into New York State led to conflicts and cultural interactions with the Native Americans.



  • 4.6.a Early interactions between Native Americans, European settlers, and enslaved and free Africans laid the foundations for a culturally diverse state.

  • 4.6.b Some European settlers sought more peaceful interactions with Native American groups than others.

  • 4.6.c The first European settlers to arrive in New York established a thriving system of trade with Native Americans.

  • 4.6.d Interactions between European settlers and Native Americans changed the cultures and ways of life for all groups.

  • 4.6.e The transatlantic slave trade impacted life and culture in New York.

4.7 Under British rule, New York was a politically, economically, and socially influential colony.

  • 4.7.a Colonists came to America for a variety of economic, political, and religious reasons.

  • 4.7.b The New England, Middle, and Southern colonies developed unique regional identities based on the their economic systems and forms of governance.

  • 4.7.d The New York colony developed as a strong commercial and financial hub of all of the British colonies.

  • 4.7.e The growing diversity within the New York colony encouraged the protection of religious and intellectual freedom.

4.8 The American Revolution resulted from growing conflicts between Great Britain and the 13 colonies over the issues of political and economic self‐rule and the intellectual beliefs about natural rights and the purpose of government.

  • 4.8a European political systems and thought influenced the development of colonial self-governance.

  • 4.8.b Production, distribution, and consumption of goods created conflict within the economic relationship between Great Britain and the 13 American colonies.

  • 4.8.c Conflicts existed between the American colonies and the British based on the ideas of individual rights.

  • 4.8.d Colonial leaders from New York and other colonies helped organize people to support the protests against Great Britain as the American colonists sought greater political and economic self‐rule.

  • 4.8.e Representatives from New York helped write the Declaration of Independence and mobilize the colonies for war.

  • 4.8.f New York played a significant role during the American Revolution in terms of geography, leadership, and decisive military strategies.

  • 4.8.g During the American Revolution, some New Yorkers remained loyal to the British, while others fully supported the war for independence.

  • 4.8.h In trying to maintain their sovereignty, the Native American groups were split between support for the British and the Americans

How did three diverse cultures interact and affect each other?

What does it mean to be free?


Knowledge:

What knowledge will student acquire as a result of this unit?




Skills

What skills will students acquire as a result of this unit?



Students will know... Content

  • Native Americans initiated the foundation of the government system that influenced the modern U.S. democracy.

  • Colonist came to Americas for a variety of economic, political, and religious reasons

  • The New England, middle, and southern colonies had distinct characteristics due to social/cultural, political, economic, scientific/technological, religious etc. differences

  • The New York colony developed as a strong commercial and financial center

  • Roles of enslaved Africans in growth and development of NY




  • Production, distribution, and consumption of goods created conflict between Great Britain and the 13 American colonies ( e.g. British Parliament’s System of taxation : Sugar Act, Stamp Act, Townsend Acts, Tea Act)




  • Some New Yorkers remained loyal to the British (loyalists), while others fully supported the war for independence and sought for political and economic self-rule (patriots).

  • The Declaration of Independence as a key document of the American Revolution (will be further discussed in Unit 4)




  • The role of the Battle of Saratoga and Yorktown




  • New York State leaders and events of American Revolution




  • Impact of the war on New York City and New York State 

Students will be able to…Skills/Strategies

Unit focuses based on the requirements of the new Social Studies Framework:
Chronological Reasoning and Causation

Explain how events are related chronologically to one another in time
Identify causes and effects using examples from a student’s life or from Social Studies
Distinguish between long‐term and immediate causes and effects (time, continuity, and change)
Recognize dynamics of historical continuity and change over periods of time
Recognize and identify patterns of continuity and change
Identify a model of historical periodization
Gathering, Using, and Interpreting Evidence

Recognize different forms of evidence used to make meaning in Social Studies (including primary and secondary sources such as art and photographs, artifacts, oral histories, maps and graphs)


Identify and explain authorship, point of view, purpose, and format
Identify arguments of others

Create understanding of the past by using primary and secondary sources




Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence


Performance Task

Through what authentic performance task will students demonstrate the desired understandings, knowledge, and skills?




Culminating Activity:
Students will be divided into 3 groups –

1. Native Americans

2. Colonists

3. Representatives of British ruler

They will have a debate on how their government system works and if they would be better on their own or co-existing in one area.

Rubric for Assessment:





Other Evidence

Through what other evidence – student work samples, observations, quizzes, tests, self-assessment or other means – will students demonstrate achievement of the desired results?



Student observations, work samples and the pre-and post-assessment will show how students demonstrate improvement of the desired skills.







Objective(s)

Related to knowledge, skills or both?



Listed Aim or Learning Intention of Each Lesson.


Assessment

Resources

Native Americans lived in complex, self-sustaining communities

How did the Lenape use natural resources to meet their basic needs? (sample lesson)

• Identify a community’s basic needs.

• Analyze an image of a Lenape village, making inferences about how this culture used natural resources to meet their needs.

How did the Lenape govern and make laws? (sample lesson)

• Discuss why communities need rules and laws.

• Read selections on Lenape government.

• Make observations about how leaders were chosen and laws were made.

• Compare to contemporary systems of government.





The Iroquois Confederacy

The League of Five Nations (Learning about New York State pp. 74-75)



http://mycapstonelibrary.com/ (Username: Captivate, password: students)

The Government of the Iroquois Nations (document on server under Social Studies resources)


Early interactions between Native Americans, European settlers and enslaved and free Africans laid the foundations for a culturally diverse state.


Teaching Points:

  1. European explorers charted and claimed lands in present day New York. (Mention The Purchase of Manhattan)

  2. Daily life in colonial New Amsterdam

  3. The Europeans established a thriving system of trade with the Native Americans (Mention Dutch West India Company)




Benchmark Guided Reading Sets (Bridge and Navigator editions)

Explorers of the Americas

Native Americans at the Time of the Explorers
Trade Books:

National Geographic - Cultures Collide



Native Americans and Europeans 1492-1700
http://www.gilderlehrman.org/history-by-era/colonization-and-settlement-1585-1763/early-settlements
http://newyorkcolonyhistory.blogspot.com/
http://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/education/for-teachers/lesson-plans/fur-trade/
The New York Colony Trade books, The Dutch in New Amsterdam, Primary Source History of the Colony of New York
Colonial Community, Colonial Women, Colonial Life by Kalman, and Colonial Home
http://www.gilderlehrman.org/history-by-era/colonization-and-settlement-1585-1763/origins-slavery
The New York Colony Trade books, The Dutch in New Amsterdam, Primary Source History of the Colony of New York
Colonial Community, Colonial Women, Colonial Life by Kalman, and Colonial Home

Under British rule, New York was a politically, economically, and socially influential colony.


  • Identify the location of the original 13 colonies (New England, Middle, and Southern)

  • Engage in reading maps to explore the role of geography in the establishment of the 13 colonies, especially of New York

  • Brainstorm ideas why people would want to live in a specific area, and how the geography plays a role

  • Discuss the significance of Britain’s rule over the thirteen colonies.

  • New York Colony had limited self-governance.




  • Colonists came to America for a variety of economic, political, and religious reasons.

  • Identify the major agricultural crops and products for trade of each region of the 13 colonies.

  • Identify the raw materials and products that were traded between the colonies and Britain and the Native Americans.

  • Explore the cultural, political, economic, scientific/technological, and religious differences between the colonies.

British Rule in colonial New York (sample lesson)

• Use Primary Source History of the Colony of New York to model identifying main ideas.

• Use text sets to find reasons why England wanted to takeover New Amsterdam and the events surrounding the takeover.

• Compare life under Dutch vs British rule using New York as a British Colony.

• Discuss the significance of Britain’s rule over the thirteen colonies.

British Slave Laws (sample lesson)

• Examine the impact of “slave laws” on the lives of Africans in

the New York colony.

• Analyze specific laws and make predictions about their effects.

• Compare the treatment of Africans by the British to their treatment by the Dutch.





Trade Books:

The History of Early New York, Life in New Amsterdam, The Colony of New York, and The New York Colony

Immigration and The Slave Trade, If You Lived When there Was Slavery in America, and Learning About the Settlements of the Americas with Graphic Organizers

New World, New Neighbors, Colonial Life, Life in a Colonial Town, Life in the Colonies, Your Travel Guide to Colonial America and Colonial Life, If You Lived in Colonial Times, What People Wore During the American Revolution, Food in Colonial America and Work in Colonial America
New Yorkers Enjoy Basic Rights (Learning About New York State p.90)

http://newyorkcolonyhistory.blogspot.com/p/religion.html


The American Revolution resulted from growing conflicts between Great Britain and the 13 colonies over the issues of political and economic self‐rule and the intellectual beliefs about natural rights and the purpose of government.

  • Look closely at examples of the British Parliament’s System of taxation: Sugar Act, Stamp Act, Townsend Acts, Tea Act. The Declaratory Act

  • Why did American colonists declare independence from Great Britain?

Students will create a chart: The Colonists Answer Back: Colonial Acts of Resistance (Page 94 Unit 3 Unit Guide)) using very specific evidence from research gathered

(boycott, the Sons of Liberty, Intolerable Act, Boston Tea Party)


www.Ushistory.org/gov/2.asp




Boston Massacre

Conduct an interactive read aloud of The Boston Massacre; model cause and effect class, class will add to cause and effect chart using stop and think strategy to update chart as interactive read aloud continues


Explore the Boston Tea Party and the New York Tea Party

Identify the point of view portrayed in Paul Revere’s engraving of the massacre

Early Leaders in Colonial New York, Molly Pitcher, Life in the Colonies

http://www.libertyskids.com/pt_activities_womenatwar.html)

http://www.libertyskids.com/pt_activities_wordpower.html






  • Analyze political cartoons

  • Discuss Slogans and Phrases; good slogans summarize important ideas in ways that are easy to remember.

Sample Slogans:

o “Give me liberty, or give me death!”

o “I have not yet begun to fight.”

o “Don’t tread on me.”

o “No taxation without representation.”

• Write for 2-3 minutes about what the slogan means and why it was effective

• Rotate the slogan to the person on the right and reflect on the new slogan.

Repeat until each quote has circled the group

• Think about where we see slogans today

Think about what makes some slogans more effective than others

• Brainstorm a slogan for the class or school









Why did American colonists declare independence from Great Britain?

• Loyalists vs. Patriots

• Define “independence” using the a semantic map

• Discuss whether colonial grievances were a reason to revolt (revolution)

The First Continental Congress








Universal Design for Learning

REPRESENTATION

The ‘what’ of teaching & learning..


ACTION & EXPRESSION

The ‘how’ of teaching & learning…

ENGAGEMENT

The ‘why’ of teaching and learning…


Appropriate graphic organizers, Sentence Frame/Discussion Starter Chart, Culminating Task

Shared Reading, Interactive Read Aloud, Guided Reading, Writer’s Workshop


Social Studies trade books at different levels make the topic accessible
Video Clips

Web sites




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