Undergraduate Course Descriptions (incl. 400-level) Graduate Seminar Descriptions Medieval Studies Major & Minor Requirements



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Fall 2015 Medieval Studies Courses


  1. Undergraduate Course Descriptions (incl. 400-level)

  2. Graduate Seminar Descriptions

  3. Medieval Studies Major & Minor Requirements

  4. Medieval Studies Graduate Concentration Requirements


Note: For Cross-listed courses the CRN is that for MDVL; the CRN for other Departments will differ
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I. Undergraduate Courses

 

MDVL 201 Medieval Literature and Culture


credit: 3 hours. Same as CWL 253 and ENGL 202. See ENGL 202.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a: UIUC: Literature and the Arts


UIUC: Western Compartv Cult

33892

Lecture- Discussion

E

01:00 PM – 01:50 PM

MWF

119 – English Building

Instructor: R. Barrett


This course introduces students to the cultural diversity of the global Middle Ages by focusing on narratives of travel and mobility. Some of these journeys cross historical landscapes: a Castilian mercenary sells his sword to the courts of Muslim Spain, a Chinese poet drinks his way up and down the Yangtze River, a Japanese concubine takes up the itinerant life of a Buddhist nun upon leaving the imperial court, and an English housewife goes on pilgrimage just about everywhere. Others traverse imaginary terrain: an Irish abbot and his monks set sail for the Isle of the Blessed, a flock of Persian birds cross seven mystical valleys to find their king, a grim outlaw fightstrolls and zombies in the wilds of Iceland, a Florentine poet burns away his sins by climbing Mount Purgatory, and knights errant wander the forests of Arthurian legend on never-ending quests. All of these travel narratives share an interest in encountering the alien (barbarians, foreigners, monsters, prodigies, heretics, etc.) as well as a realization of travel's potential for self-discovery--or self-alienation. Texts will be read in Modern English translations; assignments will include short reading responses, longer interpretative essays, and a pair of exams.
RLST 214 Introduction to Islam

credit: 3 hours.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a: UIUC: Non-Western Cultures
UIUC: Hist&Philosoph Perspect

31023

Lecture

A1

09:00 AM – 09:50 AM

MWF

History of Islamic thought from the time of Muhammad to the present, including the prophethood of Muhammad, the Qur'an, theology and law, mysticism and philosophy, sectarian movements, modernism and legal reform, and contemporary resurgence. Same as SAME 214. Credit is not given for both RLST 213 and RLST 214.

LA 218 South Asian Cultural Landscapes

credit: 3 hours.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a: UIUC: Non-Western Cultures


UIUC: Literature and the Arts

33256

Lecture- Discussion

A

11:00 AM – 12:20 PM

TR

Instructor: A. Sinha

Survey of Hindu, Buddist, and Islamic landscapes of South Asia. Examines urban structures, building typologies, and open space types through history as influenced by concepts of the natural, sacred, political, and social. Same as ASST 218.

HIST 220 Traditional China

credit: 3 hours.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a: UIUC: Non-Western Cultures
UIUC: Hist&Philosoph Perspect

49157

Lecture

A

11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

TR

384 - Armory

Instructor: K. Chow

Historical background to the modern age, tracing the Chinese state and empire from the earliest times until 1644 A.D. Basic political, social, and economic patterns; cultural, intellectual, and technological achievements; and China's impact on Asia and the world. Same as EALC 220.

RLST 223 The Qur'an (Koran)

credit: 3 hours.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a: UIUC: Non-Western Cultures
UIUC: Literature and the Arts

58924

Lecture- Discussion

A

11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

MWF

326 - David Kinley Hall

Introduction to the Qur'an (Koran), the holy scripture of Islam, examining its major doctrines, thematic development, literary style, and its relationship to pre-Qur'anic, especially Biblical, traditions. Special attention is given to various methods Muslims have used to interpret the Qur'an. Same as CWL 223, SAME 223. Prerequisite: RLST 213 or RLST 214.

HIST 226 Premodern Japanese History

credit: 3 hours.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a: UIUC: Non-Western Cultures


UIUC: Hist&Philosoph Perspect

34329

Lecture- Discussion

A

02:00 PM - 03:20 PM

TR

1065 - Lincoln Hall

Instructor: R. Toby

Introduction to the history of the Japanese people, their social and cultural systems, politics, and economy, from the earliest times to the sixteenth century. Same as EALC 226.

MDVL 240 Italy in the Middle Ages & Renaissance

credit: 3 hours. Same as CWL 240 and ITAL 240. See ITAL 240.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a: UIUC: Literature and the Arts

53946

Lecture- Discussion

E

12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

TR

G46 - Foreign Languages Building

Instructor: E. Rota


Nobles, Merchants and Poets from the dawn of the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. Discover the world that inspires fairy tales. In English.
MDVL 251 Viking Mythology

credit: 3 hours. Same as CWL 251, RLST 251, and SCAN 251. See SCAN 251.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a: UIUC: Hist&Philosoph Perspect
UIUC: Western Compartv Cult

58535

Lecture

AL1

03:00 PM - 03:50 PM

MW

1000 - Lincoln Hall

Instructor: B. Malekin


In this course we will read a variety of texts dating back to the Roman period but primarily from the centuries during and immediately after the Viking Period. Students will become familiar with the major gods and goddesses, other mythological beings, rituals, and texts as well as getting an overview of the archaeological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of pre-Christian religion in Pagan Northern Europe. In the final part of the semester we will look at reflections of Viking Mythology in everything from 19th century opera to 20th century Warner Bros Cartoons and will also treat Neopaganism and the “Revival” of Germanic Religion. Students will purchase translations of several of the most important Icelandic texts on Viking Age Religion and will also read materials that are available for free online.

MDVL 255 The British Isles to 1688

credit: 3 hours. Same as HIST 255. See HIST 255.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a: UIUC: Hist&Philosoph Perspect


UIUC: Western Compartv Cult

34352

Lecture- Discussion

A

11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

TR

307 - Gregory Hall

Instructor: D. Rabin
EALC 275 Masterpieces of East Asian Literature

credit: 3 hours.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a: UIUC: Non-Western Cultures
UIUC: Literature and the Arts

47209

Lecture

AL1

12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

MW

101 - Armory

Study of major works in the literary traditions of China and Japan, including haiku, noh, Tale of Genji, kabuki, Tang poetry, Ming theater, and the colloquial tale. Same as CWL 275. No knowledge of Chinese or Japanese language required.

ANTH 277 Ancient Cities, Sacred Land

credit: 3 hours.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a: UIUC Social Sciences


UIUC: Western Compartv Cult

46541

Lecture- Discussion

1

01:00 PM - 02:20 PM

MW

Examines urban development from its origins to the present day. Among the concepts covered are urbanism, urbanization, ceremonial centers and ceremonial cities, the city as a system, the spatial and economic organization of cities, and the built environment (sacred landscapes, vernacular architecture, places of power). Small field project is conducted in Champaign-Urbana.


CWL 311 Japanese Literature in Translation I

credit: 3 hours. Same as EALC 305. See EALC 305.

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for a: UIUC: Literature and the Arts
UIUC: Non-Western Cultures

42772

Lecture- Discussion

C

10:00 AM - 10:50 AM

MWF

108 - English Building

Instructor: E. Oyler

CWL 395 Special Topics Comp Lit I: Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Medieval Iberia

credit: 3 hours.

Presentation and discussion of subjects relating literature to other disciplines; topic varies. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

meets with SP 395




64635

Lecture- Discussion

EC

02:00 PM - 03:20 PM

TR

1062 - Lincoln Hall

Instructor: V. Hoffman


This course will explore cultural relations between Muslims, Christians, and Jews in medieval Iberia (today’s Spain and Portugal). In order to understand the complex nature of interfaith life in medieval Iberia, we will study a diverse array of sources from Arabic, Hebrew, Latin, Castilian, and Catalan literature and historiography. All readings will be taught in English translation. At the end of the semester, we will briefly examine how the history of medieval Iberia has become a framework for understanding Muslim-Christian relations in contemporary Europe.
RLST 415 Introductory Readings of the Talmud

credit: 3 hours.



64662

Lecture- Discussion

DYW

12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

TR

Instructor: D. Weiss


The Talmud, produced in Babylonia around the seventh c. CE, is one of the most important works of Jewish literature. For the last millennium, Talmud study has been a central part of Jewish religious and cultural practice. This course will explain the Talmud’s import and durability within Jewish culture while introducing students to the rigors of legal analysis that lie at the heart of most talmudic passages. The course is ideal for those interested in religion, law, logic games and questions of textual interpretation. The course will study the Talmud entirely in English translation. 
ENGL 407 Introduction to Old English

credit: 3 OR 4 hours.



49440

Lecture- Discussion

1G

12:30 PM - 01:45 PM

TR

136 - Davenport Hall

Instructor: C. Wright


this pure contemplation / of a language of the dawn

--Jorge Luis Borges, “On Embarking on the Study of the Anglo-Saxon Language”


In this course you will learn to read Old English prose and poetry in the original language, which was spoken by the Anglo-Saxon inhabitants of England from the sixth through eleventh centuries. This was the native language of Caedmon, who wrote the earliest surviving English poem (“Cædmon's Hymn”); of King Alfred, who prevented the Vikings from conquering England, and who then undertook a revival of learning by translating into English “those books which it is most necessary for all to know”; of the anonymous author of Beowulf, who memorialized a Germanic hero’s battles with a man-eating monster, his vengeful mother (the monster’s, that is), and a dragon; and of abbot Ælfric and archbishop Wulfstan, who preached in English for those who could not understand Latin, the official language of the medieval church.
We will begin with some easy prose readings (the story of Adam and Eve from Genesis, and a school dialogue about Anglo-Saxon “career choices”), and as you gradually master the basics of Old English grammar we will work our way up to more literary narrative prose such as Bede’s story of Cædmon’s miraculous transformation from cowherd to poet; King Alfred’s manifesto on education reform; and Ælfric’s story of the martyrdom of King Edmund, slain by Vikings invaders (featuring Edmund's decapitated talking head). Then in the second half of the semester we will read some of the finest shorter Old English poems, including The Wanderer and The Seafarer, two elegiac poems of exile; The Battle of Maldon, recounting the heroic defeat of an English army by the Vikings; The Dream of the Rood, a mystical vision of the Crucifixion, as told by the Cross; and The Wife’s Lament, about a woman abandoned by her former lover.  Along the way we will learn about aspects of Anglo-Saxon history, culture, and art.
MDVL 414 Petrarch & Boccaccio

credit: 3 OR 4 hours.

Same as CWL 414 and ITAL 414. See ITAL 414.

39453

Lecture- Discussion

D

11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

MW

1022 - Foreign Languages Building

Instructor: E. Stoppino


This course explores Boccaccio’s collection of tales, called Decameron, following the adventures of star-crossed lovers and inveterate sinners, ambitious merchants and licentious priests, cunning wives and clueless travelers. Through the Decameron, we will understand a crucial moment of world history, the European Middle Ages and, within it, the Mediterranean culture of circulation and contacts.
Readings and discussions in English (with dedicated readings and discussions in Italian for graduate students, majors and anyone interested).

ARTH 432 Sixteenth-Century Italian Art

credit: 3 OR 4 hours.

Painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy from 1500 to 1580. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor.



64655

Lecture- Discussion

GR

10:30 AM - 11:50 AM

MW

224 - Art and Design Building

Instructor: A. Marina

This period survey will examine the oeuvres of renowned “High Renaissance” masters such as Michelangelo, Bramante, Raphael, and Palladio. Though it will focus on the cities of Rome, Venice, and Florence, it will also address cultural exchange between artists, patrons, and audiences in these capitals and the world beyond.

MDVL 440 Early Christian Thought

credit: 3 OR 4 hours.

Same as RLST 440. See RLST 440. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: RLST 121 or RLST 202, or consent of instructor.


55887

Lecture- Discussion

U3, G4

01:00 PM - 01:50 PM

MWF

Study of major developments in early Christian thought (first four centuries) through discussion of primary texts in translation.


MDVL 443 The Byzantine Empire AD 284-717

credit: 3 OR 4 hours.

Same as HIST 443. See HIST 443.

46628

Lecture- Discussion

U3, G4

12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

TR

315 - Gregory Hall

Instructor: R. Mathisen

 

The course will examine the political, social, economic, military, institutional, religious and cultural development of the Early Byzantine Empire focusing on the reigns of Diocletian (AD 284-305) through the Heraclian Dynasty (AD 610-717).


ANTH 449 North American Archeology

credit: 3 OR 4 hours.



40279

Lecture

1G

09:00 AM - 11:50 AM

M

209A - Davenport Hall

Methods, techniques, and results of archaeology in North America; focuses on divergent approaches to the regional archaeology of North America; and surveys and synthesizes the archaeology of the subcontinent. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 220 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 459 The Ancient Maya

credit: 3 hours.

55593

Lecture- Discussion

1

09:00 AM - 11:50 AM

W

Instructor: L. Lucero

Introduction to the Ancient Maya of Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras. Evaluates theories that account for the rise and fall of Classic (c. A.D. 250-950) Maya rulership. Excavation data, inconography, and inscriptions are used to reconstruct political and social organization, ideology, subsistence activities, and inter-regional interactions. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 105.

RLST 482 Muslim-Christian Interactions

credit: 3 OR 4 hours.



64857

Lecture

A3

03:30 PM - 04:50 PM

TR

Instructor: V. Hoffman


This course explores the complexity of Muslim-Christian interactions since early Islam, focusing on mutual perceptions, intellectual exchanges in theology and philosophy, debates and polemics in the medieval period, and moving into the modern period with a look at interfaith dialogue, Muslim communities in the West, Christian minorities in the Muslim world, and the variable relationship of religion to culture in the modern West and the Muslim world.

 
II. Graduate Seminars


MDVL 522 Studies in Medieval Art

credit: 4 hours.

Same as ARTH 522. See ARTH 522.

47565

Conference

AM

02:00 PM - 04:50 PM

W

15 - Art and Design Building

Instructor: A. Marina


The subject will be the visual culture of the cult of the Christian saints in the medieval West, from tiny pilgrims’ badges to the transformation of the European landscape in response to pilgrimage. 
ENGL 578 Seminar in Literature & Other Disciplines: Medieval Paleography

credit: 4 hours.



60133

Lecture- Discussion

G

03:00 PM - 04:50 PM

M

Instructor: C. Wright


The course will cover the major European scripts from Late Antiquity through the Middle Ages, focusing on Latin scripts (from Roman cursive to Gothic), but also including major vernacular scripts (all of which were based on Latin scripts).  In addition to learning the history and development of the scripts themselves, we will learn about medieval scribal practices such as abbreviation, punctuation, and mise-en-page (layout), as well as the fundamentals of codicology from the preparation of parchment to the construction of manuscript books (including how to collate a manuscript).  A basic reading knowledge of Latin is required, but students whose focus is on a particular medieval vernacular literature can write seminar papers on those vernacular scripts or manuscripts.  We will work with facsimiles but will also conduct some meetings in the Rare Book Room and work with actual manuscripts in our collections.  We will also read classic essays on medieval palaeography and manuscript studies.  Each student will give a seminar report on one particular script (Latin or vernacular), complete exercises (transcriptions, etc.) throughout the semester, and write a seminar paper (on a script, a scribal practice or codicological topic, or on a particular scribe, manuscript, or group of manuscripts).

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III. Major in Medieval Studies


The Interdisciplinary Concentration in Medieval Studies introduces students to medieval (ca. 500- ca. 1500 CE) cultures across the world, providing them with an understanding of periods and movements, institutions, material culture, ideas, beliefs, and values of the diverse cultures that comprise the medieval globe. The coursework spans both geographic regions and disciplines to introduce students to the breadth of medieval cultures as well as to the diversity of methods and perspectives for their study.

The concentration includes a minimum of 45 hours, divided into (I) an introductory course in global medieval literatures and cultures; (II) geographical distribution coursework as specified below; (III) advanced medieval coursework selected by the student in consultation with a Medieval Studies faculty advisor; and (IV) a capstone experience involving an intensive writing and research project. Because Medieval Studies is an interdisciplinary field of study, students are urged to consult with a Medieval Studies faculty advisor to ensure that they take a diverse range of courses providing some exposure to the fields of History and Anthropology; Literature; the Arts; and Philosophy or Religion. Although study of medieval languages is not a requirement, students who intend to pursue graduate study in Medieval Studies should complete at least two courses in an appropriate language; up to twelve hours of appropriate language study can be applied to the Additional Medieval Studies Coursework.



Hours

Requirement

3

Introduction to Medieval Studies1

ENGL 202- Medieval Lit and Culture (same as MDVL 201)



18

Geographical Distribution Coursework2




6 hours- Medieval Europe- Two courses chosen from the following:

ARTH111/MDVL 111 Ancient to Medieval Art

ARTH 222/ MDVL 222 Medieval Art

ARTH 231/MDVL 231 Northern Renaissance Art

ITAL 240/MDVL 240 Italy Middle Ages & Renaiss

HIST 245/MDVL 245 Women & Gender in Pre-Mod Europe

HIST 247/MDVL 247 Medieval Europe

SCAN 251/MDVL 251 Viking Mythology

SCAN 252/MDVL 252 Viking Sagas in Translation

HIST 255/MDVL 255 British Isles to 1688

ARCH 412/MDVL 412 Medieval Architecture





6 hours- Classical and medieval East Asia- Two courses chosen from the following:

HIST 220 Traditional China

HIST 226 Pre-modern Japanese History

EALC 240 Chinese Civilization

EALC 275 Masterpieces of East Asian Lit

RLST 287 Introduction to Buddhism






6 hours- Medieval Central Asia, South Asia, or the Middle East- Two courses chosen from the following:

HIST 130 History of South Asia

HIST 135 History of Islamic Middle East

LA 218 S Asian Cultural Landscapes

LA 222 Islamic Gardens and Architecture

RLST 213 Intro to Islam (ACP)

RLST 214 Introduction to Islam

RLST 223 Qur’an Structure and Exegesis

RLST 260 Mystics and Saints in Islam

RLST 283 Jewish Sacred Literature

CWL 208 Lits & Cultures of South Asia


21

Additional Medieval Studies Coursework

Medieval-related coursework from participating departments selected in consultation with the concentration advisor. At least 12 hours must be at the 300- or 400-level. A list of courses in Medieval Studies is maintained on the Medieval Studies Program website . Up to 12 hours of appropriate language study can be applied to meet this requirement with approval of aMedieval Studies faculty advisor.



3

Capstone Experience

A capstone experience (normally in the student’s senior year) involving intensive interdisciplinary research and writing on a medieval topic. Any 400-level MDVL course (or medieval-related course not cross-listed with MDVL, with the approval of a Medieval Studies faculty advisor) can be designated as a capstone experience with approval of the instructor. For the course to qualify as a capstone experience, the student must undertake a substantial research project that supplements the standard course requirements, in the form either of an additional project or of a longer and more research-intensive version of an existing course project. The project must involve both primary and secondary research using advanced disciplinary methodologies and resources.



45

Total Hours

  1. A student may substitute the “Medieval World” section of HIST 100, Global History, by petition to a Medieval Studies faculty advisor. Only the section of HIST 100 devoted to the Middle Ages may be substituted.

  2. A student may substitute up to 6 hours in geographical distribution coursework with courses on the medieval civilizations of the Americas: ANTH 277-Ancient Cities, Sacred Land, ANTH 278- Climate Change & Civilization, or both. However, at least one course must still be taken from each of the three regional areas.

A Major Plan of Study Form must be completed and submitted to the LAS Student Academic Affairs Office before the end of the fifth semester (60-75 hours). For further information contact the Director of Medieval Studies, Prof. Charles D. Wright cdwright@illinois.edu

Minor in Medieval Studies

This interdisciplinary Minor in Medieval Studies introduces students to medieval (ca. 500- ca. 1500 CE) cultures across the world, providing them with an understanding of periods and movements, institutions, material culture, ideas, beliefs, and values of the diverse cultures that comprise the medieval globe. The coursework spans both geographical regions and disciplines to introduce students to the breadth of medieval cultures as well as to the diversity of methods and perspectives for their study.

The minor includes a minimum of 21 hours, divided into (I) an introductory course in global medieval literatures and cultures; (II) geographical distribution coursework as specified below; and (III) advanced medieval coursework selected by the student in consultation with a faculty advisor. 3 hours of appropriate language study can be applied to the Additional Medieval Studies Coursework.


Hours

Requirements

3

Introduction to Medieval Studies1

ENGL 202- Medieval Lit and Culture (same as MDVL 201 and CWL 253)



9

Geographical Distribution Coursework 2




3 hours- Medieval Europe- One course chosen from the following:

ARTH 111/MDVL 111 Ancient to Medieval Art

ARTH222/MDVL 222 Medieval Art

ARTH 231/MDVL 231 Northern Renaissance Art

ITAL 240/MDVL 240 Italy Middle Ages & Renaiss

HIST 245/MDVL 245 Women & Gender in Pre-Mod Europe

HIST 247/MDVL 247 Medieval Europe

SCAN 251/MDVL 251 Viking Mythology

SCAN 252/MDVL 252 Viking Sagas in Translation

HIST 255/MDVL 255 British Isles to 1688

ARCH 412/MDVL 412 Medieval Architecture





3 hours-Classical and Medieval East Asia- One course chosen from the following:

HIST 220 Traditional China

HIST 226 Pre-modern Japanese History

EALC 240 Chinese Civilization

EALC 275 Masterpieces of East Asian Lit

RLST 287 Introduction to Buddhism







3 hours-Medieval Central Asia, South Asia, or the Middle East-One course chosen from the following:

HIST 130 History of South Asia

HIST 135 History of Islamic Middle East

LA 218 S Asian Cultural Landscapes

LA 222 Islamic Gardens and Architecture

RLST 213 Intro to Islam (ACP)

RLST 214 Introduction to Islam

RLST 223 Qur’an Structure and Exegesis

RLST 260 Mystics and Saints in Islam

RLST 283 Jewish Sacred Literature

CWL 208 Lits & Cultures of South Asia


9

Additional Medieval Studies Coursework

Medieval-related coursework from participating departments selected in consultation with the minor advisor. At least 6 hours must be at the 300- or 400-level. A list of courses is maintained on the Medieval Studies Program website. 3 hours of appropriate language study can be applied to meet this requirement with approval of the Director of the Program in Medieval Studies. .



21

Total Hours


  1. A student may substitute the “Medieval World” section of HIST 100, Global History, by petition to the Director of Medieval Studies. Only the section of HIST 100 devoted to the Middle Ages may be substituted.

  2. A student may substitute 3 hours in geographical distribution coursework with a course on the medieval civilizations of the Americas: ANTH 277-Ancient Cities, Sacred Land or ANTH 278- Climate Change & Civilization.

For further information contact the Director of Medieval Studies, Prof. Charles D. Wright cdwright@illinois.edu. There is also a Major (Concentration) in Medieval Studies.
Medieval Studies Courses

Advanced Courses that Satisfy the Additional Medieval Coursework Requirement in the Medieval Studies Concentration (Major) and Minor

Other courses on medieval topics may be used with approval of the Director of the Program in Medieval Studies.

EALC 305 Japanese Literature in Translation, I

RLST/MDVL 344 Medieval Jewish Thought

HIST 345/MDVL 345 Medieval Civilization

HIST 346/MDVL 346 The Age of the Renaissance

ARTH 369/MDVL 369 Spirituality and Experience

ANTH 376 Aztec Civilization

ENGL 407/MDVL 407 Introduction to Old English

ENGL 411/MDVL 411 Chaucer

ENGL 412/MDVL 410 Medieval British Literatures

ITAL 413/MDVL 413 Dante

ITAL 414/MDVL 414 Petrarch & Boccaccio

CMN 415/MDVL 415 Classical Rhetorics

FR 417/MDVL 417 History of the French Language

SLAV 417 11th-17th C Russ Lit & Lang

ITAL 420/MDVL 420 Masterpieces Renaiss Lit

ARTH 423/MDVL 423 Romanesque Art

ARTH 424/MDVL 424 Gothic Art

ARTH 425/MDVL 425 Manuscripts and Early Printing

ARTH 431/MDVL 431 Topics: Northern Art 1300-1500

ARTH 433/MDVL 433 Fifteenth-Century Italian Art

RLST 440/MDVL 440 Early Christian Thought

HIST 443/MDVL 443 Byzantine Empire AD 284-717

HIST 445/MDVL 444 Medieval England

ANTH 449 North America Archaeology

ANTH 459 The Ancient Maya

LAT 460/MDVL 460 Medieval Latin

GER 470/MDVL 470 Middle Ages to Baroque

RLST 458 Christians and Jews 1099-1789

RLST 480 Islamic Law

RLST 482 Muslim-Christian Interactions

EALC 307 Classical Chinese Literature

EALC 413 Pre-Modern Chinese Drama

EALC 463 Drama in Pre-Modern Japan

RLST 484 Buddhist Meditation



EALC 488 History of Chinese Buddhism
For further information contact the Director of Medieval Studies, Prof. Charles D. Wright cdwright@illinois.edu
IV. Graduate Concentration in Medieval Studies



Required Courses:

Required Hours

Two graduate courses at the 400- or 500-level in Medieval Studies selected by the student and approved by the Advisory Board of Medieval Studies

6-8

MDVL 500, Spring Medieval Studies seminar

4

Reading knowledge of a major international medieval language essential to the student’s field of specialization, as determined by the student in consultation with a faculty supervisor and with the approval of the Director, as demonstrated by completion of a college-level course with a grade of B or better. Note: Students who fulfill this requirement by taking courses at the 200- or 300-level may be required to take additional coursework at the 400- and 500-level to meet the requirement of 24 hours of graduate-level coursework.

3-4

Reading knowledge of another medieval language with a minimum grade of B, or completion of a one-semester introductory course in a medieval language (such as FR 531 or ENGL 507) with a minimum grade of B, or an equivalent approved by the Medieval Studies Advisory Committee.

4

Thesis Hours Required (min/max applied toward degree):

6-8

Total Hours

24

Other Requirements:*




A dissertation or thesis in the area of Medieval Studies. A member of one of the cooperating departments external to the student's home department will be a member of the student's dissertation or thesis committee.




In addition to the graduate concentration requirements, students must also complete the requirements of their major degree.





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