Ucc/ugc/eccc proposal for New Course Please attach proposed Syllabus in approved university format



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UCC/UGC/ECCC

Proposal for New Course



Please attach proposed Syllabus in approved university format.


1. Course subject and number:

HA 376

2. Units:

3

See upper and lower division undergraduate course definitions.


3. College:

The W.A.Franke College of Business

4. Academic Unit:

Hotel and Restaurant Management

5. Student Learning Outcomes of the new course. (Resources & Examples for Developing Course Learning Outcomes)



  1. The students will be able to describe the human progression from raw food eater to modern day cooking.

  2. The students will be able to explain why certain cultures cultivated and ate the foods historical documents state they did.

  3. The students will be able to discuss the significance of meal times throughout history.

  4. The students will be able to relate the social status of a person to the food they ate and their place at the table.

  5. The students will be able to illustrate how human exploration impacted cultures and the foods humans ate.

6. Justification for new course, including how the course contributes to degree program outcomes, or other university requirements / student learning outcomes. (Resources, Examples & Tools for Developing Effective Program Student Learning Outcomes).



Course has been offered as a pilot course over the past 2 years. Demand for the course has

been strong with enrollment as high as 40 people per section. Student evaluations for the

course are high. This course will strengthen the department’s restaurant curriculum and use

our state-of-the-art kitchen. The course helps students gain a unique perspective and useful

knowledge on the cuisines of various cultures around the world that they will encounter and

prepare during their careers. 45 hours are required to ensure that students have sufficient

college-level coursework and experience (equivalent of three full semesters to be on track for

a four year program) for the course.  Because this course enhances the HRM and IHM

degrees and the related certificates, we want to postpone student enrollment until they have

had at least three semesters of college-level coursework and are looking at courses for the

academic content.  To allow students into the courses earlier in their career risks making the

courses “experimental courses” to be taken for fun or for non-academic reasons.  We do not

have the resources to offer these courses to all students.

7. Effective BEGINNING of what term and year?



Fall 2014




See effective dates calendar.










8.  Long course title:

CUISINE AND CULTURE

(max 100 characters including spaces)




9. Short course title:

CUISINE AND CULTURE

(max. 30 characters including spaces)

10. Catalog course description (max. 60 words, excluding requisites):



This course is designed to explore the History of Food and People. Each chapter in the course (along with the companion text) will utilize the following information:

11. Will this course be part of any plan (major, minor or certificate) or sub plan (emphasis)?

                                                                                                                                    Yes  No 

If yes, include the appropriate plan proposal.


12. Does this course duplicate content of existing courses? Yes  No 

If yes, list the courses with duplicate material. If the duplication is greater than 20%, explain why NAU should establish this course.

13. Will this course impact any other academic unit’s enrollment or plan(s)?              Yes  No 

      If yes, include a letter of response from each impacted academic unit.


14. Grading option:      Letter grade                     Pass/Fail                        Both 


15. Co-convened with:




14a. UGC approval date*:




(For example: ESE 450 and ESE 550) See co-convening policy.

    *Must be approved by UGC before UCC submission, and both course syllabi must be presented.





16. Cross-listed with:







(For example: ES 450 and DIS 450) See cross listing policy.

      Please submit a single cross-listed syllabus that will be used for all cross-listed courses.




17. May course be repeated for additional units?




Yes     No 

16a. If yes, maximum units allowed?







16b. If yes, may course be repeated for additional units in the same term?




Yes     No 




18. Prerequisites:

Completed 45 units or more and ((HRM Major or Restaurant Management (CERT) or Event Management (CERT) for HRM and Interior Design Majors or International Exchange Student Group))




If prerequisites, include the rationale for the prerequisites.

HA 376 can only be taken by HRM majors with almost junior status or by those students

that are part of an International Exchange Student Group or HRM Majors enrolled in the

aforementioned certificates or Interior Design Majors enrolled in the Interior Design Event

Management Certificate.

19. Co requisites:

NONE




If co requisites, include the rationale for the co requisites.

20. Does this course include combined lecture and lab components?                   Yes  No 

If yes, include the units specific to each component in the course description above.

21. Names of the current faculty qualified to teach this course:

Wally Rande, Lenka Hospodka, Kathleen Krahn



Answer 22-23 for UCC/ECCC only:
22. Is this course being proposed for Liberal Studies designation?             Yes  No   

       If yes, include a Liberal Studies proposal and syllabus with this proposal.

23. Is this course being proposed for Diversity designation?                                    Yes    No 

       If yes, include a Diversity proposal and syllabus with this proposal.



FLAGSTAFF MOUNTAIN CAMPUS




Scott Galland

2/6/2014

Reviewed by Curriculum Process Associate

Date







Approvals:











Department Chair/Unit Head (if appropriate)

Date








Chair of college curriculum committee

Date








Dean of college

Date







For Committee use only:











UCC/UGC Approval

Date


Approved as submitted: Yes  No 

Approved as modified: Yes  No 



EXTENDED CAMPUSES











Reviewed by Curriculum Process Associate

Date







Approvals:







Academic Unit Head

Date




Division Curriculum Committee (Yuma, Yavapai, or Personalized Learning)

Date




Division Administrator in Extended Campuses (Yuma, Yavapai, or Personalized Learning)

Date




Faculty Chair of Extended Campuses Curriculum Committee (Yuma, Yavapai, or Personalized Learning)

Date




Chief Academic Officer; Extended Campuses (or Designee)

Date







Approved as submitted: Yes  No 

Approved as modified: Yes  No 



Approved by the SHRM area on 01/09/2013

Accepted by the curriculum committee on 11/21/2013

nau_franke_rgb
MASTER SYLLABUS

HA 376 Cuisine and Culture (3 units)


  1. Catalog Description:

Examines the way history, culture, politics, wars and religion determine how and what we eat.


  1. Prerequisites:

Completed 45 units or more and ((HRM Major or Restaurant Management (CERT) or Event Management (CERT) for HRM and Interior Design Majors or International Exchange Student Group))

Justification: HA 376 can only be taken by HRM majors with almost junior status or by those students

that are part of an International Exchange Student Group or HRM Majors enrolled in the aforementioned



certificates or Interior Design Majors enrolled in the Interior Design Event Management Certificate. 45 hours

are required to ensure that students have sufficient college-level coursework and experience

(equivalent of three full semesters to be on track for a four year program) for the course.  Because

this course enhances the HRM and IHM degrees and the related certificates, we want to postpone

student enrollment until they have had at least three semesters of college-level coursework and are

looking at courses for the academic content.  To allow students into the courses earlier in their career

risks making the courses “experimental courses” to be taken for fun or for non-academic

reasons.  We do not have the resources to offer these courses to all students.


  1. Course Learning Goals: Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

  1. Describe the human progression from raw food eater to modern day cooking.

  2. Explain why certain cultures cultivated and ate the foods historical documents state they did.

  3. Discuss the significance of meal times throughout history.

  4. Relate the social status of a person to the food they ate and their place at the table.

  5. Illustrate how human exploration impacted cultures and the foods humans ate.




  1. Course Materials:

A text related to cuisine and culture, such as Cuisine and Culture, A History of Food and People, Civitello (2011).


  1. Teaching Methods:

Lecture, video and PowerPoint presentations, in-class discussion, hands-on cooking and demonstrations.


  1. Mechanisms for Feedback to Students/Interaction Between Students and Professors:

Written comments on student assignments, online feedback via e-mail and the Blackboard Learning System, class discussions, and individual oral feedback during class and office hours.


  1. Evaluation Tools:

Assessment of student learning outcomes:

Assessment Activities

Points

Percentage

Chapter Quizzes (10)

200

25

Group Project

200

25

Exams (4)

400

50

Total

800

100

Grading System



Grade

Scale

A

90-100%

B

80-89.9%

C

70-79.9%

D

60-69.9%

F

0-59.9%




  1. Use of Technology and Information Systems

PowerPoint presentations of course material.


  1. Collaborative or Team Activities

Small in-class group exercises and a group presentation.


  1. Projects

A major group presentation.


  1. University Policies and Statement Regarding Academic Dishonesty

Current university required policies will be attached each term to actual syllabi. Students are responsible to inform themselves of university policies regarding Academic Integrity. In general, students found to be in violation of the code (e.g., cheating, fabrication, fraud, and plagiarism) are awarded a grade of F in the course. The complete policy on academic integrity is in Appendix F of NAU’s Student Handbook.
XII. Course Content:
A. Topic:

  1. From Raw to Cooked: Prehistory, Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, India
    Grain, Grape and Olive: The Ancient Mediterranean
    Crazy Bread, Coffee, and Courtly Manners: Christendom and Islam in the Middle Ages

  2. New World Food: Potato, Corn, Chile, Chocolate

  3. Food Goes Global: The Columbian Exchange

  4. America from Colony to Country: Sacred Cod, Black Rice, Maple Moon

  5. Hutespot, Stove Potatoes and Haute Cuisine: Seventeenth to Eighteenth-Century Dutch, Russian and French Cuisine

  6. Cattle, Coca-Cola, Cholera: The United States and Europe 1850-1900

  7. Africa and Asia: Native vs. Colonial Cuisine

  8. The Purity Crusade, Cuisine Classique, and Prohibition: 1900-1929 in Europe and the United States

  9. Soup Kitchens, Span and TV Dinners: The Depression, World War II, and the Cold War

  10. Agribusiness vs. Organic: The 1970s into the Third Millennium


B. General Knowledge and Management Skills *


Program Learning Outcome

Course Learning Outcomes

(Letter corresponds to learning outcomes alphabetically listed in Section III)



Supporting Targeted Course Performance Level: I,D,or M

Communication Skills

A,B,C,D,E

I,D

Technology Skills







Problem Solving Skills

E

I,D

Analytical Skills







Conceptual Skills







Ethical Skills







Global Skills

A,B,C,D,E

I,D

Human Relation Skills







Career and Life Skills







Technical Skills






*I = Introduced, D = Developed and Practiced with Feedback, M = Demonstrated at the Mastery Level, Blank = Not Treated in this Course


Definitions of Student Mastery Levels (1). These set performance levels that are somewhat parallel to Bloom’s Taxonomy.

I = The student can identify examples (and non-examples) of the desired outcome, name the elements involved, and answer "objective, multiple-choice, fill-in the blank" type of test questions showing awareness. (Objective tests are not necessarily simple, but they are most likely to be used at this introductory level.)

D = The student can describe, demonstrate or construct an example of the desired outcome but with guidance about each step. In some cases, the steps to learn the outcome may be spread among more than one course or activity within a course. Also included here is evaluation of existing examples of the outcome (pro's and con's, etc.) Essay questions and short projects would be used as evidence.

M = The student can demonstrate the outcome given a problem statement and appropriate data and tools. The student would need to synthesize skills learned previously in isolation. The skill demonstration would be sufficiently rigorous that an outside stakeholder (future employer) would be satisfied with it for an entry level position after graduation. Term papers, senior projects and research papers, senior portfolios, case studies, and capstone coursework would be used as evidence.

(1) Source: http://business.uhh.hawaii.edu/documents/documents/MasterSyllabusMKT310revFeb2012.pdf.
PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOME DEFINITIONS


  • Communication Skills*: Use oral and written communication skills necessary to function effectively in the hospitality industry.

  • Technology Skills: Use technological tools while presenting and interacting with data and

information.

  • Problem Solving Skills: Use leadership and management skills when solving problems and conflicts.

  • Analytical Skills: Use financial and accounting management knowledge when evaluating the profitability of different business decisions.

  • Conceptual Skills: Apply strategic and conceptual principles when analyzing business decisions at the property and corporate level.

  • Ethical Skills: Identify ethical dilemmas and are able to recognize and evaluate alternative courses of action.

  • Global Skills: Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively with others from different cultures and backgrounds and to identify factors affecting international hospitality businesses.

  • Human Relation Skills: Use emotional intelligence skills when interacting with guests and employees.

  • Career and Life Skills: Participate in personal and professional development learning activities for successful career and life planning and management.

  • Technical Skills: Demonstrate core competencies in the hospitality field.

* Skill: the ability, coming from one's knowledge, practice, aptitude, etc., to do something well.


Effective Fall 2012


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