Type: Setting the context. Length: 15–20 minutes. Explicit purpose/S



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4. Māori and Settler Societies


TOPIC: 3) Early European contact.
TYPE: Setting the context.
LENGTH: 15–20 minutes.

EXPLICIT PURPOSE/S: To compare characteristics of Māori and settler societies to increase understanding of why there would be culture clash.
IMPLICIT PURPOSE/S: To show that Māori had their own successful culture and way of life which has been eroded by colonisation.
GROUP SIZE: Any.
CHARACTERISTICS: Less suitable for academic or more advanced groups.
FACILITATOR KNOWLEDGE NEEDED:

low - if done quickly with information lightly covered;

medium - if done in greater depth.

FACILITATION SKILLS NEEDED: Low.
RESOURCES NEEDED:


  • Māori and Settler Societies worksheet 1;

  • Māori and Settler Societies answers 1;

  • Māori and Settler Societies worksheet 2;

  • Māori and Settler Societies answers 2.


TECHNOLOGY NEEDED: None.
INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Provide participants with copies of the two worksheets, Māori and Settler Societies 1 and 2.

2. Participants use a pencil to draw a line between each statement and the house representing the society that the statement relates to.

3. Participants work in pairs or small groups (3-4) to share ideas and discuss their answers.

4. Give everyone an answer sheet so that they can compare their own. If groups are working at very different speeds, you may move among the groups that have finished to address any differences in the answers.

5. In the big group, ask participants to identify any answer /information that was new to them or surprised them.

6. Answer the most pressing questions or direct participants to other sources of information.

7. Note any myths or misunderstandings that can be dealt with in later sections.


TEACHING TIPS: There may be a need to define culture and give examples. Tell participants that they will need to take off their '2010 spectacles' and put on a pair for the period between 1820 and 1840. Elaborate on examples if necessary but avoid trying to explain aspects of Māori culture.
COMMONLY ASKED QUESTIONS: None.
VARIATIONS: Use only one worksheet if time is short. Step 2 can be done in pairs with one worksheet between two participants.
SOURCES OF INFORMATION ABOUT CONTENT:

1. Naumann, R. (1990). The Tauiwi, the Later Immigrants (p8). Auckland, New Zealand: New House Publishers.


2. Nauman, R., Harrison, L. & Winiata, T. (1990). Te Tiriti o Waitangi: The living Treaty (pp 4-13 Auckland: New House Publishers.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: Glenys Daley.

Everyone gets an education for

everyday life. Some are chosen

to be given specialist knowledge.

Ours is an oral culture, so what is learned must be remembered accurately so it can be passed on.






If you get sick you will need someone who knows what to collect from the forest to make you well. You may have got sick because you have done something wrong.


We belong to this place where our ancestors lived. We must respect it and care for it.


Some of these statements come from Māori society and some

from settler society. Decide which is which.




Reading is a new and

fascinating thing. We are

all learning to do it!


New Zealand had measles, smallpox and tuberculosis epidemics in the 1820s and 30s. These diseases are not new to us.

For people of the

lower classes, to have your

own piece of land is like a

dream come true.




If some outsider kills one of your family, it is your responsibility to get revenge.


The old people are the keepers of knowledge and they do not surrender their knowledge lightly. They pass it on to a carefully selected member of the younger generation.


People live in harmony

with nature. Everything has

a life force - people, animals,

land, rivers and sea.




It’s where you come from

that matters, and who

your ancestors are - and not who you are or what work you do.


Inventions such as the microscope have shown us what causes disease.


Only the rich and

the middle class get

an education.

Working class

children have to work.

One in five of our

people are illiterate.


Castor oil and common sense cure most things. The way to deal with toothache is to pull

the tooth out.




Insanity is shameful.

The insane are locked up and hidden away from society.



Rich and poor alike

spend a lot of their

money on alcohol.


For people of the

lower classes, to have your

own piece of land is like a

dream come true.




An educated man can read

and write. The church runs schools and teaches people

how to read the Bible.


Hospitals are established in most towns but women still die in childbirth. Diptheria, whooping cough and typhoid are often fatal

for children, and cancer

is a major cause of

death for adults.






Settler society statements are in bold.

Everyone gets an education for

everyday life. Some are chosen

to be given specialist knowledge.

Ours is an oral culture, so what is learned must be remembered accurately so it can be passed on.




Reading is a new and

fascinating thing. We are

all learning to do it!


New Zealand had measles, smallpox and tuberculosis epidemics in the 1820s and 30s. These diseases are not new to us.

For people of the

lower classes, to have your

own piece of land is like a

dream come true.




If some outsider kills one of your family, it is your responsibility to get revenge.


The old people are the keepers of knowledge and they do not surrender their knowledge lightly. They pass it on to a carefully selected member of the younger generation.


We belong to this place where our ancestors lived. We must respect it and care for it.


People live in harmony

with nature. Everything has

a life force - people, animals,

land, rivers and sea.




It’s where you come from

that matters, and who

your ancestors are - and not who you are or what work you do.


Inventions such as the microscope have shown us what causes disease.


Only the rich and

the middle class get

an education.

Working class

children have to work.

One in five of our

people are illiterate.


Castor oil and common sense cure most things. The way to deal with toothache is to pull

the tooth out.




Insanity is shameful.

The insane are locked up and hidden away from society.



For people of the

lower classes, to have your

own piece of land is like a

dream come true.




An educated man can read

and write. The church runs schools and teaches people

how to read the Bible.


Hospitals are established in most towns but women still die in childbirth. Diptheria, whooping cough and typhoid are often fatal

for children, and cancer

is a major cause of

death for adults.




Rich and poor alike

spend a lot of their

money on alcohol.


If you get sick you will need someone who knows what to collect from the forest to make you well. You may have got sick because you have done something wrong.





Treaty Resource Centre

He Puna Matauranga o Te Tiriti









Some of these statements come from Māori society and some

from settler society. Decide which is which.




To cultivate the land is a

Christian duty. People who

don’t use land productively

shouldn’t be allowed

to own it.

Our nation is the most

powerful in the world.

It is our Christian duty

to bring civilisation to the

natives and to convert

the heathen.




Houses are wooden. A cottage style with a verandah is very popular.


The spiritual world is all around us. It is important to respect things that are sacred and to do what you ought to do.


The poor and the unemployed live in overcrowded slums in the towns. The gentry live in fine

large houses.


Children should be seen

and not heard. Spare the rod and you spoil the child.

Alcoholism and venereal

disease are common amongst sailors and whalers.


New arrivals live in tents and

makeshift shelters. Those who have money aim to buy land and build a house.



Look to the past to guide you in your life.


Cooking and eating should be done outside of your house. You never take food into the place where you sleep.

It is the grandparents

who teach and care for

the children most of

the time.




In the past, our people never had these diseases that spread so quickly and leave so many people dead -

influenza, measles and chicken pox.



The New Zealand Company cares more about profits for the shareholders than about getting supplies to us.


It is our job to look

after and care for the land. The

land is like the mother who

nurtures us.



There have been great advances in modern

medicine, including the

stethoscope and bacteriology.


Whether we are digging the gardens or fishing, whatever the work, we do it together.









Treaty Resource Centre

He Puna Matauranga o Te Tiriti






Most families consist

of father, mother and

perhaps four or

five children.




My family is led by my parents.

Most of my brothers and sisters

and their partners live with

our family, and of course

all our children.





Statements from settler society are in bold.


To cultivate the land is a

Christian duty. People who

don’t use land productively

shouldn’t be allowed

to own it.


Our nation is the most

powerful in the world.

It is our Christian duty

to bring civilisation to the

natives and to convert

the heathen.




Houses are wooden. A cottage style with a verandah is very popular.


The spiritual world is all around us. It is important to respect things that are sacred and to do what you ought to do.


The poor and the unemployed live in overcrowded slums in the towns. The gentry live in fine

large houses.


Children should be seen

and not heard. Spare the rod and you spoil the child.

Alcoholism and venereal

disease are common amongst sailors and whalers.


New arrivals live in tents and

makeshift shelters. Those who have money aim to buy land and build a house.



Look to the past to guide you in your life.


Cooking and eating should be done outside of your house. You never take food into the place where you sleep.

It is the grandparents

who teach and care for

the children most of

the time.




In the past, our people never had these diseases that spread so quickly and leave so many people dead -

influenza, measles and chicken pox.



The New Zealand Company cares more about profits for the shareholders than about getting supplies to us.


It is our job to look

after and care for the land. The

land is like the mother who

nurtures us.



There have been great advances in modern

medicine, including the

stethoscope and bacteriology.


My family is led by my parents.

Most of my brothers and sisters

and their partners live with

our family, and of course

all our children.


Whether we are digging the gardens or fishing, whatever the work, we do it together.









Treaty Resource Centre

He Puna Matauranga o Te Tiriti






Most families consist

of father, mother and

perhaps four or

five children.











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