Triumph of Parliament in England Book Outline Name Honors European Studies



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Triumph of Parliament in England Book Outline Name__________________________________
Honors European Studies

  1. The Tudors and Parliament

  1. From 1485-1603 England was ruled by the _________ Dynasty. Though the Tudors believed in __________________, they shrewdly recognized the value of good relations with Parliament.

  2. Parliament was used to being consulted by the monarch on important matters

    1. Example:

    2. Example:

    3. Example:

  1. Early Stuarts

  1. Elizabeth died in _________ and passed the thrown to her relatives, the _________, ruling family of _________. They were not as popular as the Tudors. The result was a “________ ___________________” that pitted the Stuart monarchs against __________________.

  2. Royal Challenge – __________________ was the first Stuart monarch. He claimed absolute power, lecturing Parliament on __________________. He clashed with Parliament over _________ and _________ policy. In order to finance wars without the consent of Parliament, he dissolved Parliament and collected _________ on his own. James also had issues with _________, or Protestants that wanted to “purify” the Church of England of Catholic practices. As a result, today we have the __________________ Bible.

  3. Parliament Responds – In 1625 _________________ inherited the throne. Charles summoned Parliament when he needed to raise _________. Parliament demanded that he sign the __________________________, prohibiting the king from raising taxes without Parliament’s consent. He signed the petition and then dissolved Parliament.

  4. The Long Parliament – Parliament met on and off for 13 years. Parliament tried Charles’ chief ministers and _________ them. In 1642, Charles attempted to arrest radical leaders of Parliament. This would lead to the ___________________________.

  1. English Civil War

  1. Civil War lasted from __________________.

  2. Cavaliers and Roundheads – _________________ were supporters of __________________. They expected a quick victory. The forces of Parliament were known as __________________. They were composed of country gentry, town-dwelling manufacturers, and Puritan clergy. The Roundhead leader was __________________. Under Cromwell, the Roundheads defeated the Cavaliers and by _________ the King was in the hands of Parliamentary forces.

  3. Execution of a King – Parliament set up a court and put Charles on _________. In 1649 he gave the signal himself and the executioner severed the king’s _________ with a single stroke. For the first time, a ruling monarch had been tried and executed by his own _________. Parliament sent a clear signal that no ruler could claim absolute power and ignore the rule of law.

  1. The Commonwealth

  1. After the Civil War the House of Commons declared England a _________ under the leadership of Oliver Cromwell.

  2. Challenges to the Commonwealth – Supporters of __________________, heir to the throne, attacked England. Parliament passed a law exiling most _______________ after the Irish attacked. Squabbles also splintered forces within the Commonwealth. The ________________ thought that the _________ men should have as much say in government as the gentry, lawyers, and other leading citizens. Cromwell suppressed these and other radical groups and soon granted himself the title __________________. From then on he ruled through the _________.

  3. End of the Commonwealth – Cromwell died in _________ and the Puritans soon lost their grip on England. Many people were tired of _________ rule and in 1660 a newly elected Parliament invited ________________ to return to England to rule.

  1. From Restoration to Glorious Revolution

  1. Charles II was a popular ruler. He restored the official ___________________________ but tolerated other _________________ such as Presbyterians, Quakers, and Baptists. Although he accepted the Petition of Right he shared his father’s faith in ___________________________.

  2. A New Clash With Parliament – In 1685 Charles’ brother _________________ inherited the throne. He angered his subjects by flaunting his ________________ faith, suspending laws, and appointing Catholics to __________________. In 1688 Parliament invited James’ Protestant daughter _________ and her Dutch husband _________ to rule England. James II fled to France and the bloodless overthrow of a king became known as the ___________________________.

  3. English Bill of Rights – The Bill of Rights ensured the superiority of Parliament over the ________________. It required the monarchy to summon Parliament regularly and gave the power of the _________. A king or queen could no longer interfere with Parliamentary debates. It also barred any __________________ from sitting on the throne.

    1. Other traditional rights of English citizens that the Bill or Rights restored were:

      1. ______________________________________________________

      2. ______________________________________________________

      3. ______________________________________________________

      4. ______________________________________________________

    2. The _________________________ of 1689 granted limited _________ freedoms to Puritans, Quakers, and other dissenters, though not yet Catholics. Only members of the ___________________________ could hold public office.


Triumph of Parliament in England Book Outline Name__________________________________
Honors European Studies Page 421-425

  1. The Tudors and Parliament

  1. From 1485-1603 England was ruled by the Tudor Dynasty. Though the Tudors believed in Devine Right, they shrewdly recognized the value of good relations with Parliament.

  2. Parliament was used to being consulted by the monarch on important manners

    1. Example: Approval of the Act of Supremacy when Henry VIII broke with the Roman Catholic Church

    2. Levying new taxes to pay for wars

    3. Queen Elizabeth’s marriage or issues of foreign affairs

  1. Early Stuarts

  1. Elizabeth died in 1603 and passed the thrown to her relatives, the Stuarts, ruling family of Scotland. They were not as popular as the Tudors. The result was a “century of revolution” that pitted the Stuart monarchs against Parliament.

  2. Royal ChallengeJames I was the first Stuart monarch. He claimed absolute power, lecturing Parliament on Divine Right. He clashed with Parliament over money and foreign policy. In order to finance wars without the consent of Parliament, he dissolved Parliament and collected taxes on his own. James also had issues with Puritans, or Protestants that wanted to “purify” the Church of England of Catholic practices. As a result, today we have the King James Bible.

  3. Parliament Responds – In 1625 Charles I inherited the throne. Charles summoned Parliament when he needed to raise taxes. Parliament demanded that he sign the Petition of Right, prohibiting the king from raising taxes without Parliament’s consent. He signed the petition and then dissolved Parliament.

  4. The Long Parliament – Parliament met on and off for 13 years. Parliament tried Charles’ chief ministers and executed them. In 1642, Charles attempted to arrest radical leaders of Parliament. This would lead to the English Civil War.

  1. English Civil War

  1. Civil War lasted from 1642-1649.

  2. Cavaliers and RoundheadsCavaliers were supporters of Charles I. They expected a quick victory. The forces of Parliament were known as Roundheads. They were composed of country gentry, town-dwelling manufacturers, and Puritan clergy. The Roundhead leader was Oliver Cromwell. Under Cromwell, the Roundheads defeated the Cavaliers and by 1647 the King was in the hands of Parliamentary forces.

  3. Execution of a King – Parliament set up a court and put Charles on trial. In 1649 he gave the signal himself and the executioner severed the king’s head with a single stroke. For the first time, a ruling monarch had been tried and executed by his own people. Parliament sent a clear signal that no ruler could claim absolute power and ignore the rule of law.

  1. The Commonwealth

  1. After the Civil War the House of Commons declared England a Commonwealth under the leadership of Oliver Cromwell.

  2. Challenges to the Commonwealth – Supporters of Charles II, heir to the throne, attacked England. Parliament passed a law exiling most Catholics after the Irish attacked. Squabbles also splintered forces within the Commonwealth. The Levellers thought that the poor men should have as much say in government as the gentry, lawyers, and other leading citizens. Cromwell suppressed these and other radical groups and soon granted himself the title Lord Protector. From then on he ruled through the army.

  3. End of the Commonwealth – Cromwell died in 1658 and the Puritans soon lost their grip on England. Many people were tired of military rule and in 1660 a newly elected Parliament invited Charles II to return to England to rule.

  1. From Restoration to Glorious Revolution

  1. Charles II was a popular ruler. He restored the official Church of England but tolerated other Protestants such as Presbyterians, Quakers, and Baptists. Although he accepted the Petition of Right he shared his father’s faith in absolute monarchy.

  2. A New Clash With Parliament – In 1685 Charles’ brother James II inherited the throne. He angered his subjects by flaunting his Catholic faith, suspending laws, and appointing Catholics to high office. In 1688 Parliament invited James’ Protestant daughter Mary and her Dutch husband William to rule England. James II fled to France and the bloodless overthrow of a king became known as the Glorious Revolution.

  3. English Bill of Rights – The Bill of Rights ensured the superiority of Parliament over the monarchy. It required the monarchy to summon Parliament regularly and gave the power of the purse. A king or queen could no longer interfere with Parliamentary debates. It also barred any Roman Catholic from sitting on the throne.

    1. Other traditional rights of English citizens that the Bill or Rights restored were:

      1. Trial by jury

      2. Abolition of excessive fines

      3. Abolition of cruel and unusual punishment

      4. Habeas corpus

    2. The Toleration Act of 1689 granted limited religious freedoms to Puritans, Quakers, and other dissenters, though not yet Catholics. Only members of the Church of England could hold public office.


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