Travel Journal



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    1. Travel Journal


Objectives of this lesson:

  • use timelines to establish the order of historical events

  • identify terms relating to time periods

  • use latitude and longitude coordinates to understand the relationship between people and places on the Earth

  • analyze the purposes and applications of political, physical, special purpose maps

  • describe the Six Essential Elements of Geography


-What do timelines help us do?

Specific questions to answer:



  1. How could you use a timeline for your life?

  2. Do timelines always about to be about history? Can they be about other things? (sports, technology, etc…)

  3. What is the difference between BCE and CE?

  4. What else can you use besides BCE and CE?

  5. What is a millennium?

  6. What is a century?

  7. What is a decade?

  8. What is an era?

  9. What are epochs?

-What is the longitude and latitude location of the town you live in?

Hint: Go to this awesome website http://www.latlong.net/

Specific questions to answer:


  1. Use the link above to find the exact location of your town

  2. What is the definition for longitude?

  3. What is the definition for latitude?

  4. What are coordinates?

  5. What is the Prime Meridian?

  6. What is the equator?

  7. What is the purpose of the longitude and latitude lines?

  8. What two hemispheres is North America located in?

  9. Is Africa on the eastern or western hemisphere?

  10. Is all of South America in the Southern hemisphere? Why or why not?

-What is the purpose of longitude and latitude lines?

Specific questions to answer:



  1. What does absolute location mean?

  2. What does relative location mean?

  3. Give an example of an absolute location.

  4. Give an example of a relative location.

-Why do we use different types of maps?

Specific questions to answer



  1. What do political maps show?

  2. What do physical maps show?

  3. What do special purpose maps show?

  4. Can you provide an example of a special purpose map?

  5. How can a political map be helpful?

  6. How can a physical map be helpful?

  7. How can a special purpose map be helpful?

Describe the Six Essential Elements of Geography.

Questions are below for you to answer

*Geography: the study of how living and non-living things effect each other.

Essential Element

Description

World in Spatial Terms

Describes the absolute or relative locations



Place and Regions

Place describes what is in a certain location (nature made, or human made) Region: what different location have in common (climate, culture/language)



Physical Systems

Natural changes (volcanoes, hurricanes, glaciers); Communities of plants and animals (how these rely on one another)



Human Systems

Movement: (how ideas, people, beliefs, and goods have moved); Settlement: anything humans have done to change the earth’s surface.



Environment

How humans affect the environment; how the environment affects humans



Use of Geography

To understand relationships among people, places, environment over time, understand past to prepare for future.



Questions to answer based on the above information:

  1. You tell your best friend that your house is behind the movie theaters. What element of geography are you using?

  2. The people living in the arctic are required to build igloos to stay warm and to survive. What elements of geography are you using here?

  3. People living in California and Florida are good at surfing. People living in Wisconsin and Michigan know how to drive well in the snow. What element of geography are you using?

  4. Your local neighborhood wants to destroy a conservation area where many animals live to create a big movie theatre and parking. What element of geography is this?

  5. Humans are burning fossil fuels every day to create new things. The environment is being affected by all this pollution. What element of geography is this?

01.02 Travel Journal

Objectives for this lesson:

  • interpret primary and secondary sources

  • describe the methods and tools historians use

  • describe how history relates to the other social sciences

  • describe the roles of historians and recognize how historical interpretations may differ

  • locate sites in Africa and Asia where archaeologists have found evidence of early human societies, and trace their migration patterns to other parts of the world

Questions to answer:

-How does history relate to other social sciences?

Specific questions to answer(select/view the graphic on this page):



  1. What is the definition of social sciences?

  2. What is the meaning of history?

  3. What is archeology?

  4. What questions might an archeologist ask about the past?

  5. What tools does an archeologist use?

  6. What is geography?

  7. What questions might geographers ask to themselves about the past?

  8. What kind of tools do geographers use?

  9. What is political science?

  10. What kinds of questions might a political science ask about the past?

  11. What is economics?

  12. What questions might an economist ask themselves about the past?

  13. What kinds of things might an economist want to find when studying a civilization?

-What tools do historians, geographers, and archaeologists use to study the world?

Specific questions to answer:



  1. What is a GPS and how is it helpful?

  2. What is a GIS and how it is helpful?

  3. What is satellite imagery and how it is helpful?

  4. What is the exact meaning of fossils?


*Make sure you view the interactive slideshow

-Where have archaeologists located sites of early human societies?

Specific questions to answer:



  1. Which continents have the oldest fossils in the world?

  2. What tools did Danold Johanson use to complete his research?

  3. Who is “Lucy” and why is she important?

  4. Who is “Ardi” and why is she important?

  5. Where were Ardi and Lucy found?

  6. If Ardi and Lucy are the oldest human fossils ever found, what can historians conclude about where life started? (what continent did life start on?)

-What types of sources do historians use?

Specific questions to answer:



  1. What is a primary source?

  2. What is a secondary source?

  3. How many examples of a primary source can you list?

  4. How many examples of a secondary source can you list?

  5. Why are primary and secondary sources valued in research?

*Make sure to complete the “interactive” exercise

-How do historians interpret primary and secondary sources?

Specific questions to answer:



  1. What does the word “bias” mean?

  2. Why do you want to avoid bias when researching/re-telling history?

  3. What kind of questions should you ask yourself to determine if the source is valid?

*Extra question not from the lesson, but very important to answer

-How do historians find out about something?

  1. Similar to a scientist in a lab, what are the steps that a historian asks him/herself when it comes to research?

  2. What does “historiography” mean?

  3. *Use the interactive timeline and provide a 3-5 sentence summary about what you noticed:


01.03 Travel Journal

Objectives to this lesson:



  • Analyze the challenges of the hunter-gatherer lifestyle

  • Interpret how geographic boundaries affect migration and interaction with others

  • Use maps to trace significant migrations and their results

Question to answer:



-How long have humans been on Earth?

Specific questions to answer (use the interactive slideshow):



  1. What is the difference between the Neanderthals and the Homosapiens?

  2. About how is the oldest human ever found?

  3. Where were Lucy and Ardi found?

  4. What is another name for the Paleolithic Era?

-Would you call yourself a nomadic or a settled person? Explain your response.

Specific questions to answer:



  1. Based on the information in page 2 of this lesson, what is a hunter-gatherer?

  2. What does the word nomadic mean?

  3. Did nomads have permanent or temporary homes? Why?



-What might you find in a Paleolithic cave?

Specific questions to answer:



  1. Using the interactive slideshow on page 2 of this lesson, what kinds of objects would you find in a cave during the Paleolithic Era and how were those objects used?


-How did the environment affect early human life?

Specific questions to answer:



  1. What is the definition of environment?

  2. What is the definition of adapt?

  3. What is the definition for resources?

  4. For the early humans, what were the ideal places to settle? Why?

  5. Why was it best for survival to stay in larger groups?


-What is migration? Describe the movement of humans over Earth.

Specific questions to answer:



  1. What does migration mean?

  2. Why was it necessary to move from one place to another? (hint: resources/climate/geography)



-What is the Neolithic Revolution?

Specific questions to answer:



  1. What happened around 10,000 years ago?

  2. What does domestication mean?

  3. What is the definition of the Neolithic Revolution?


01.04 Travel Journal

Objectives for this lesson:



  • Compare the lifestyles of hunter-gatherers with those of early agricultural settlers

  • Explain how the environment and resources affected the development and spread of agriculture

Questions to answer:


-How did agriculture begin?
Specific questions to answer:

  1. What does the word agriculture mean?

  2. Why was it better to settle in one area?


-Why was the Neolithic Revolution important?
Specific questions to answer:

  1. Before they learned how to farm, what did the nomads depend on for survival?

  2. Now that they learned how to farm, did the nomads have to move around from place to place?

  3. Being able to stay in one area, how did this improve the living of the nomads?


-How did Neolithic humans adapt to agriculture? Take notes from the slide show in this chart. One example appears for you.

Specific questions to answer (and questions in the chart):



  1. What does the word scarcity mean?

  2. What does the word fertile mean?

  3. What does the word sustain mean?




Example of Adaptation

Description

Dwelling

Neolithic humans built permanent places to live. They built homes made of stone, mud, and wood.

New uses for clay and wood

What were the benefits of using clay and wood?

Water

If water was too far from the settlement, what did the early humans build to fix this problem?

Fuel

How were wind towers and windmills used for the survival of the early humans?

Crop rotation

Why was it important to rotate the crops?

Terracing

If you are living along a hillside, how can terracing help you out?

Animals

How did the nomads use the animas for their advantage?

-How did agriculture and technology spread?
Specific questions to answer:

  1. What does the world surplus mean?

  2. How did having a surplus of food benefit the early humans?

  3. Why was it important for civilizations to trade with one another? (think about it like today, why do you want to trade with a friend?)



-How did early humans' social lives change with the invention of agriculture?

Specific questions to answer:



  1. Now that the nomads could stay in one place, what new things did they develop to create a more complex civilization?

  2. What was the benefit of having a writing system?


01.05 Travel Journal

Objectives of this lesson:

  • describe how agriculture and metal-working relates to the settlement, growth, and development of civilization

  • identify the characteristics of civilization

  • explain how ancient civilizations were influenced by their locations and natural resources

  • understand the workings of ancient civilizations' governments

Questions to answer:

-What are the major features of civilization?

Specific questions to answer:



  1. What does the word urbanization mean?

  2. What is the definition of a city?

  3. Why were the major cities built near rivers?

  4. What is silt and why is it important?

  5. With having a surplus of food, why would people focus on new things like religion?

*Please review the interactive slideshow

-How did agriculture and metal-working relate to the settlement, growth and development of civilization?

Specific questions to answer:



  1. How did having food surpluses affect the population of early civilizations?

  2. What were the new kinds of job specializations that became available now that people met their most basic food source?

  3. What is the definition of textiles?

  4. What is metallurgy?

  5. How is metallurgy helpful to the early civilizations?

-How did government work in a complex society?

Specific questions to answer:



  1. What were the main decisions that small groups/clans had to make in their establishments?

  2. As the population grew, what happened to the role of government and those in charge?

  3. Back in the ancient world, what project would consist of “public works” for the early settlers?

  4. What is the definition of a myth?

  5. Why do you think myths are important for the early humans?

  6. Back in the ancient world, why did everyone believe the kings were special?

-Does a social pyramid exist in our society today?
Specific questions to answer:

  1. In the ancient world, which group of people were at the top of the social pyramid, who were in the middle, and which people were at the bottom?

  2. Using the interactive image, what do you notice about the people at the top (population) versus the people at the bottom (population)?

  3. In today’s society, do we have social structures? (hints: schools, jobs, society?)

-Why did rulers often build massive buildings?

Specific questions to answer:



  1. What is the definition of hieroglyphs?

  2. Why did rulers build such large structures/temples?

  3. Why was writing important in the ancient world?

  4. Who were the main people who wrote things down in the ancient worlds?

-How did competition lead to the growth of city-states?

Specific questions to answer:



  1. What were the main reasons why civilizations fought during this time?

  2. How did city-states form?

  3. How did empires form?

**Now that you are all done with your lessons for Module 1, please contact me via text/email to provide you with review material for this module before calling for your DBA.


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