Translating the ngss for Classroom Instruction and the Common Core Standards (ccss)



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Translating the NGSS for Classroom Instruction and the Common Core Standards (CCSS)

Unit Lesson or Title


Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment [through recycling]

Patricia Netzley’s book: Issues in the Environment




Age/Grade/Subject

Grade 6-8: Language Arts, Science and Technology

NGSS Performance Expectations

ESS3.C: Human Impacts on Earth Systems

  • Human activities have significantly altered the biosphere, sometimes damaging or destroying natural habitats and causing the extinction of other species. But changes to Earth’s environments can have different impacts (negative and positive) for different living things. (MS-ESS3-3)

  • Typically as human populations and per-capita consumption of natural resources increase, so do the negative impacts on Earth unless the activities and technologies involved are engineered otherwise. (MSESS3-3),(MS-ESS3-4)

Common Core State Standards Connections

ELA/Literacy

RST.6-8.7 Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text with a version of that information expressed visually (e.g., in a flowchart, diagram, model, graph, or table). (MS-ESS3-2)

WHST.6-8.1 Write arguments focused on discipline content. (MS-ESS3-4)

WHST.6-8.7 Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration. (MS-ESS3-3).

WHST.6-8.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (MS-ESS3-4)


Lesson length:

Four or more 50-minute lessons

Background Information:

Biodegradable products are those man-made products that are capable of disintegrating easily in nature; consequently, discarded items made of biodegradable materials will take up less room in a landfill and are therefore preferable to items made of non-biodegradable materials that take many years to break down. Moreover, any scientific inventions that use only biodegradable materials are more "eco-friendly" to the environment than others and can still fulfill society’s needs, desires, and values. So students will explore scientific principles to design a man-made biodegradable product that can be used practically in society and marketed as such. http://www.discoveryeducation.com/teachers/free-lesson-plans/recycling.cfm (Hedberg, 2001)


Disciplinary Core Ideas



ESS3.C: Human Impacts on Earth Systems

  • Human activities have significantly altered the biosphere, sometimes damaging or destroying natural habitats and causing the extinction of other species. But changes to Earth’s environments can have different impacts (negative and positive) for different living things. (MS-ESS3-3)

  • Typically as human populations and per-capita consumption of natural resources increase, so do the negative impacts on Earth unless the activities and technologies involved are engineered otherwise. (MSESS3-3), (MS-ESS3-4)




Science and Engineering Practice


Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions

  • Constructing explanations and designing solutions in 6–8 builds on K–5 experiences and progresses to include constructing explanations and designing solutions supported by multiple sources of evidence consistent with scientific ideas, principles, and theories. Apply scientific principles to design an object, tool, process or system. (MS-ESS3-3)

Engaging in Argument from Evidence

  • Engaging in argument from evidence in 6–8 builds on K–5 experiences and progresses to constructing a convincing argument that supports or refutes claims for either explanations or solutions about the natural and designed world(s).

  • Construct an oral and written argument supported by empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support or refute an explanation or a model for a phenomenon or a solution to a problem. (MS-ESS3-4)




Cross Cutting Concepts


Influence of Science, Engineering, and Technology on Society and the Natural World

  • All human activity draws on natural resources and has both short and long-term consequences, positive as well as negative, for the health of people and the natural environment. (MS-ESS3-4)



  • The uses of technologies and any limitations on their use are driven by individual or societal needs, desires, and values; by the findings of scientific research; and by differences in such factors as climate, natural resources, and economic conditions. Thus technology use varies from region to region and over time. (MS-ESS3-2), (MS-ESS3-3)







5E Stage

Science/Engineering Practice or Crosscutting

What the Teacher Does…

What the Students Do….

What Are Students Learning? What is the Evidence of Learning?

Engage

ESS3.C: Human Impacts on Earth Systems

 Human activities have significantly altered the biosphere, sometimes damaging or destroying natural habitats and causing the extinction of other species. But changes to Earth’s environments can have different impacts (negative and positive) for different living things. (MS-ESS3-3)



Lesson 1; Place the word “biodegradable” on the board and enact, a think-pair share discussion followed by whole group discussion on the word’s meaning. Then continue down the vocabulary list : environmentalism, landfill, polyester, and recycle, in the same way Present example listed, and . Introduce Patricia Netzley’s Book, Issues in the Environment and encourage students to skim through the data and sources found there.

Lesson 2: Divide class into biodegradable groups. Begin with brainstorming and free-writing (see lesson) [Assign extension] Discuss the throw-it-away society that we live in today to begin the discussion. Then provide the ten steps to designing and invention:

http://school.discoveryeducation.com/sciencefaircentral/Science-Fair-Projects/10%20steps%20to%20an%20Invention%20Project.pdf



Lesson 3: Explain to students design approval sheet and research based writing example reviewing both and answering any questions the students may have (see links under lesson three).

Lesson 1: Students will reflect on the word, share with a partner, and place the pair’s meaning on the chart on the board.

Students will continue discussion and use book as referencing material.



Lesson 2: Students will brainstorm ideas for products and writing down their ideas, questions and practicality of their idea (free-write) in their journals.

Lesson 3: Students will design their project on paper using design sheets

Building schemas between prior knowledge and experiences and new knowledge. Marzano-Pickering word construction from prior experience and context.

Lesson 1: Chart or board with word meanings and journals.




Explore

Typically as human populations and per-capita consumption of natural resources increase, so do the negative impacts on Earth unless the activities and technologies involved are engineered otherwise. (MSESS3-3),(MS-ESS3-4)

WHST.6-8.1 Write arguments focused on discipline content. (MS-ESS3-4)

WHST.6-8.7 Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow will for multiple avenues of exploration. (MS-ESS3-3).

WHST.6-8.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (MS-ESS3-4)

Lesson 1: Have students form think-pair-share groups and define word meanings based on discussion and consensus.

Lesson 2: Tell students to discuss, and explore the possible materials they will need for their projects.

Lesson 3: Teacher will assist students as they draw their designs on the design sheet and answer any questions they have about the project or experiment project writing sheet.

Lesson 1: Students will interact with partner in a respectful manner.

Lesson 2: Students will write a list of materials they would need for each product in their science logs and then explore (free-write) which idea seems most practical.

Lesson 3: Students will build their design on the design sheet provided.

Building connections between prior knowledge and new knowledge through the senses--kinesthetic (Using Gardner-learning styles and meta-cognition—to build schemas).

Lesson1: Chart on board and observation during group discussion.

Lesson 3: Design sheets

Explain

Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions constructing explanations and designing solutions in 6–8 builds on K–5 experiences and progresses to include constructing explanations and designing solutions supported by multiple sources of evidence consistent with scientific ideas, principles, and theories. Apply scientific principles to design an object, tool, process or system. (MS-ESS3-3)

MP.2 Reason abstractly and quantitatively. (MS-ESS3-2)

Engaging in Argument from Evidence Engaging in argument from evidence in 6–8 builds on K–5 experiences and progresses to constructing a convincing argument that supports or refutes claims for either explanations or solutions about the natural and designed world(s).

 Construct an oral and written argument supported by empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support or refute an explanation or a model for a phenomenon or a solution to a problem. (MS-ESS3-4)



WHST.6-8.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection ,and research. (MS-ESS3-4)


Lesson 1: .Provide denotative meaning.

Lesson 2: Conference with each group to determine feasibility of each project. Encourage students to support reasoning with data: see Issues in the Environment.

Lesson 3: Provide assistance to any group that needs help devising their arguments.

Lesson 1: Students will support their meaning with experience and/or examples.

Lesson 2: Students will support their project with sound reasoning and abstract and quantitative examples as well as sound judgment.

Lesson 3: Create a valid graphic design of their project and then write a brief argument on the necessity for their products to present to another group (pairs or groups).

Students interact in a way that supports conceptual advancement and assimilation of knowledge:

Lesson 1: chart and discussion.

Lesson2:

Lesson 3: Graphic design of project and brief (2-3 paragraphs) of argument

Elaborate

The uses of technologies and any limitations on their use are driven by individual or societal needs, desires, and values; by the findings of scientific research; and by differences in such factors as climate, natural resources, and economic conditions. Thus technology use varies from region to region and over time. (MS-ESS3-2),(MS-ESS3-3)

Have students find examples of biodegradable materials that match their meanings.

Lesson 2: Have students research Biodegradable materials on the Internet for economic feasibility of project-elaborating on the materials.

Lesson 3: Explain the use of the storyboard to students.

Lesson 1: Students will choose a biodegradable material.

Lesson 2: Students will provide data (sources from internet) that illustrates feasibility of project—listed in journal.

Lesson 3: Students will transfer knowledge of design to the storyboard creating dialogue from their argument paragraphs.

Students integrate expert and go beyond given information to generate and improve their ideas as is evidenced by illustrating through examples (verbal and physical).


Evaluate

ESS3.C: Human Impacts on Earth Systems (reflections and products)(MSESS3-3), (MS-ESS3-4)


Lesson 1: Observe interactions and assist where students have no prior knowledge.

Lesson 2: send the groups to the internet to determine the biodegradable nature of their project’s materials.

Lesson 3: Teacher will conference with each group after reviews.

Lesson 1: Students will ask for help, support their chosen examples with human impact (environmental) vocabulary and charted meaning with contextual experiences.

Lesson 2: Students will summarize data to support project idea.



Lesson 3: Students will present an argument to another group for review (see criteria).

Lessons 1-3: Creation of products that use only biodegradable materials; models or diagrams clear and carefully executed; marketing campaigns persuasive and creatively conceived, persuasive argument, journal writing, chart, research sources, storyboards, dialogue, You-tube/podcasts [extension],.




Grouping Strategies


Biodegradable groups

Whole groups

Think-pair-share groups

Individuals




Materials and Equipment


Chart paper and markers, science logs,/journals, Patricia Netzley’s book, Issues in the Environment, students who choose to make models of their inventions will determine and obtain the materials they need on their own,: Computer with internet access, and research materials about biodegradable materials.

Description of Performance Tasks

Note: The performance tasks should include elements from the three dimensions from the NGSS – knowing and doing




Lesson 1:

  • Review with your students what they know about biodegradable materials. Place the word “biodegradable” on the board and enact, a think-pair share discussion followed by whole group discussion on the word’s meaning. Have a volunteer from each pair place their meaning on the board, and come to a consensus on the meaning. Follow this with the denotative meaning and ask each group: how close did you come to the dictionary meaning? Be sure they understand that biodegradable materials are those that disintegrate easily in nature. Students may find examples of biodegradable materials in class or internet.

  • Continue the discussion by asking students why biodegradable materials are more "environment friendly," and therefore preferable to those which do not? Then continue down the vocabulary list : environmentalism, landfill, polyester, and recycle, in the same way.

  • Tell your students that in the early 1990s, a young student invented a golf tee made entirely out of biodegradable substances. Discuss with the class why this invention was important. (Millions of golf tees are used each year, and many people leave them on the golf course after they have used them. Standard golf tees take a long time to disintegrate.) Then challenge students to come up with their own biodegradable inventions. Introduce Patricia Netzley’s Book, Issues in the Environment and encourage students to skim through the data and sources found there [good beginning place for ideas for next lesson].

Lesson 2:

  • Divide the class into pairs or small groups, asking each group to dream up a product that consists only of biodegradable materials they can find in their homes or outside: the groups may call themselves the biodegradable material they have chosen. For an extension, more advanced students can interview past generations: grandparents, parents, great-uncles on if they recycled ( soda bottles, milk bottles, thrift shops, etc) and how for attitudes toward recycling and compare and contrast to youth today and society’s throw-it-away attitude in both writing and graphic form.

  • Then provide the ten steps to designing and invention (teacher can print up these sheets by going to the link provided: http://school.discoveryeducation.com/sciencefaircentral/Science-Fair-Projects/10%20steps%20to%20an%20Invention%20Project.pdf

  • Have them begin by brainstorming ideas for products and writing down their idea in their journals. For ideas, they can do research on the Internet (print up research sources).

  • Students should then write a list of materials they would need for each product in their science logs and then determine (free-write) which idea seems most practical.

  • Have each group go to the Internet and research their materials to make sure they are, in fact, biodegradable

Lesson 3:

  • Once groups have chosen their inventions, they should either make models of their products or draw detailed diagrams, showing how and where each material would be used. Example of researched based writing http://school.discoveryeducation.com/sciencefaircentral/Science-Fair-Projects/Junior%20Light%20Switcher.pdf . Then write a brief argument on the necessity for their products (pairs or groups). Argument presented to another group for review as well as conference about the progress of project and its practical application with teacher: click on and hand out validity and approval for design sheet. http://school.discoveryeducation.com/sciencefaircentral/Science-Fair-Projects/Invention%20Planning.pdf



  • Students will create public service advertisement’s dialogue and storyboards: http://fcit.usf.edu/lmm/pdfs/Storyboards.pdf prior to initiating marketing campaigns.

Lesson 4:

  • Have groups create marketing campaigns (podcasts or You- tube) to convince other people to purchase their environment-friendly products.



  • Students will reflect the process of creating a model or product that reduces human impact and its development and process of marketing the product in their journals.




Supporting English Learners











Reading or Writing Activity

Listed in Learning and Instructional Sequence



Support for Emerging learners

Support for Expanding learners

Support for Bridging learners

Book: Charting reading/round robin or small groups

Whole grouping/ partnering

Extension work/

Adult supervision and guidance of difficult or out of child’s or out of the child’s zone of proximal (Vygotzy). Scaffolding information in small increments accomplishes this with discussion feedback:.

Review argument with partners and conferences with teacher

Cooperative pairs

Leadership roles

Adult supervision and guidance of difficult or out of child’s or out of the child’s zone of proximal (Vygotzy). Scaffolding information in small increments accomplishes this with discussion feedback: outline and graphic organizers.




Supporting Struggling Learners








Activity

Support for Students who Need Minor Support

Supports for Students who Need Intensive Support

Write the word or draw a picture (ESL) on a sheet of chart paper

Group support/ Teacher supervision

Adult supervision

Internet research

Cooperative pairing with more advanced learner

Adult supervision

Reflection, journal writing, product designing

Cooperative groups: division of jobs

Adult supervision

Conferences

Practicality of design

Exploring through senses or aids

Research with partner

Adult assistance

Internet aids via IRA (International Reading Association)




Supporting Advanced Learners





Activity

Listed in Learning and Instructional Sequence



Extension for Advanced Students




Find and deconstruct another TED Talk video about reducing waste or recycling.











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