Transition Planning for Students with Disabilities: a guide for Families



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Transition Planning for Students with Disabilities:
A Guide for Families

This publication is produced through the Bureau of Exceptional Education and Student Services (BEESS), Florida Department of Education, and is available online at http://www.fldoe.org/ese/pub-home.asp. For information on available resources, contact the BEESS Resource and Information Center (BRIC).


BRIC website: http://www.fldoe.org/ese/clerhome.asp

Bureau website: http://www.fldoe.org/ese/

E-mail: cicbiscs@FLDOE.org

Telephone: (850) 245-0477=5

Fax: (850) 245-0987

Florida Department of Education

Bureau of Exceptional Education and Student Services
Bambi J. Lockman, Chief

Cathy Bishop, Administrator, ESE Program Development and Services


This guide was originally developed in 2005 by Janet Adams and Carmy Greenwood of the Florida Department of Education and Sheila Gritz of the Career Development and Transition Project, The Transition Center at the University of Florida. The guide has been updated by W. Drew Andrews of Bradford County Schools and Lori Garcia of Project 10: Transition Education Network at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg, a special project funded by the Florida Department of Education, Division of Public Schools, Bureau of Exceptional Education and Student Services, through federal assistance under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Part B.

We would also like to acknowledge the following individuals for their content expertise and/or editing contributions to this guide:

Danielle Roberts-Dahm, Project 10
Sheila Gritz, Bureau of Exceptional Education and Student Services
Jordan Knab, Director, Project 10
Rusty Monette, ArtStudio Graphics
Gail Munroe, Bureau of Exceptional Education and Student Services
Michele Polland, Bureau of Exceptional Education and Student Services
Copyright
State of Florida
Department of State
2011

Authorization for reproduction is hereby granted to the State System of Public Education consistent with section 1006.39(2), Florida Statutes. No authorization is granted for distribution or reproduction outside the State System of Public Education without prior approval in writing.


Table of Contents





Table of Contents 4

Welcome 5

How to Use This Guide 6



Student and Family Involvement 7

What Are Transition Services? 8

What’s Different about the Transition Components of the IEP Meeting? 10

Notice of the Meeting 10

Participants 10

Preparation for the Individual Educational Plan (IEP) Meeting 12

Contents of the Transition Components of the IEP 13

Measurable Postsecondary Goals 15

Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance 15

Benchmarks or Short-Term Objectives 16

Measurable Annual Goals 16

Needs Addressed by Measurable Annual Goals 17

Statement of Courses of Study (Transition Services) 17

Transition Services 17

Responsibilities and Linkages 18

Teamwork 20

School District/School Responsibilities 20

Agency Responsibilities 20

Family Responsibilities 22

Student Responsibilities 22

Diploma Options 24

Standard Diploma 25

Standard Diploma with FCAT Waiver and End-of-Course Assessment Waivers 25

Special Diploma 26

Special Diploma, Option 1 26

Special Diploma, Option 2 26

Effects of the Diploma Choice 27

Certificates of Completion 28

State of Florida Diploma/General Educational Development 28

Getting a Head Start on Transition 29

Middle School and Earlier 29

High School 30

When Your Young Person Becomes an Adult 32

Age of Majority 32

Free Appropriate Public Education, Ages 18–21 32

Parents’ Dictionary 34

Directory 43

State Agencies 43

Florida Department of Children and Families 43

Florida Department of Education 43

Florida Parent Centers 44

Other Florida Organizations 46

National Organizations 48

Local Contacts 54



Observation Guide — Before IEP Meetings 55

Parents’ Record of IEP Meeting 57

Contact Log 59

Transition Checklists 60

Age 14 Transition Services Requirements Checklist (for IEPs developed to be in effect when the student turns age 14) 60

Age 15 Transition Services Requirements Checklist (for IEPs developed to be in effect when the student turns age 15) 62

Age 16 Transition Services Requirements Checklist (for IEPs developed to be in effect when the student turns age 16) 63

Age 17 Transition Services Requirements Checklist (for IEPs developed to be in effect when the student turns age 17) 65

Age 18 Transition Services Requirements Checklist (for IEPs developed to be in effect when the student turns age 18) 67

Ages 19–21 Transition Services Requirements Checklist (for IEPs developed to be in effect when the student turns age 19, age 20, and age 21 through the student’s 22nd birthday or the school year in which the student turns age 22) 69




Welcome



The individual educational plan (IEP) can become a plan that will help your young person move from school to adult life...
This is a guide to planning for the successful transition of a student with disabilities from school to adult life. It was written for families of Florida’s students with disabilities. However, other people involved in transition planning, such as students and teachers, will also find this guide helpful.
Transition planning focuses on plans and dreams you and your young person have for the future. The purpose of transition planning is to provide your young person with the services and supports he or she needs to make a successful move into adult life.
Transition planning usually begins at age 14. However, it may begin before age 14 for some students. For example, earlier transition planning may help stop a student from dropping out of school. Earlier transition planning may also be needed for a student with significant disabilities because it may take more time to set up needed post-school services.
It is important to note that:


  • Transition planning begins with the individual educational plan (IEP) to be in effect when the student turns age 14 for students with an IEP.

  • Transition services are a part of the IEP, not a separate plan.

  • Transition planning involves the student, the family, school staff, agency staff, and others identified by the IEP team.

  • Transition planning is not a one-time event.

  • The transition process continues until the student exits from high school.

This guide will help you understand how the IEP can become a plan that will help your young person move from school to adult life.


Note: For general information about the education of students with disabilities (ages 3 to 22), see For Parents of Florida’s Students with Disabilities: An Introduction to Exceptional Student Education (available from the Bureau Resource and Information Center at the address listed on the inside front cover of this book).





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