Topic: The Industrial Revolution Title: Child Labor



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Topic: The Industrial Revolution Title: Child Labor


This lesson is designed to students about child labor during 19th century England and the dawn of the industrial Revolution. Students will look and create their own notes from a secondary resource document which describes in detail way in which children were exploited for almost half a century. It serves as a beginning, middle and ending to a mini-unit on the Industrial Revolution.

Resources (primary resource documents, artifacts, material needs, etc.)



  • Political Cartoon and Picture

  • Child Labor and the Industrial Revolution (Secondary Resource Article)

  • Picture Notes Worksheet

  • Child Labor-Two Column Notes” (Cornell Notes)

  • Child Labor-Two Column Notes-Tier 2” (Cornell Notes)

  • Child Labor-Our Class Notes” (Cornell Notes)

Common Core Standards



  • RH 2

Essential Standards



  • 7.H.1 (Objective 7.H.1.3)

  • 7.H.2 (Objective 7.H.2.3)

  • 7.G.1 (Objective 7.G.1.2)

Background Information



  • During the course of study with the seventh grade Social Studies curriculum, students will have a basic understanding of the benefits and hazardous conditions that were brought about by the Industrial Revolution, specifically in London, England and its effects on children living during this time.

Instructional Sequence (before, during, and after instruction)

Step 1


  • Students will take a minute to look at the picture and political cartoon listed on the handout entitled “Picture Notes.”

  • Students are encouraged to fold their notes in half vertically so that they are only looking at the pictures and not thinking about having to write.

Step 2


  • Students will complete the “Picture Notes” in which they write about different aspects of the picture and political cartoon. (Allow about 5-10 minutes to complete this part)

  • Teacher should encourage students to include items that may not be listed in the directions if they think it is important to understanding the meanings of both pictures.

Step 3


  • Students will be split into five groups. Each group will rotate through 5 different stations highlighting the effects of the Industrial Revolution. Give students around 4-5 minutes per station.

Step 4


  • Students will be given a copy of the “Industrial Revolution-Two Column Notes

  • Students will use the slides, Child Labor and the Industrial Revolution to create their own notes. (There are five different sections for students to focus on)

Step 6


  • Review important facts as a class.

  • Have students complete the extended thinking questions at the end of class or finish for homework.



http://30.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lwbzjwni5e1qz5q5oo1_500.jpg

http://www.cartoonstock.com/newscartoons/cartoonists/sra/lowres/sran156l.jpg

Directions: Take a minute to look at the above picture and political cartoon. In the blanks opposite of each one, write down what you think each one means. Some things to consider are the time period, what the people are thinking, and what it may represent, etc. If you run out of room to write, then use the blank space beside these directions.

Picture Notes

______________________________________________________________________________

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______________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________
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______________________________________________________________________________
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Extended Thinking Questions:


  1. What were the living conditions like for people moving to cities to look for jobs? How would these conditions lower your quality of life?


















  1. How did the Industrial Revolution lead to environmental problems? What similar environmental problems does our world face today?


















  1. As a child living during the Industrial Revolution, would you have been happy? Why or not? Be sure to use facts to support your answer.
















Child Labor-Two Column Notes

Directions: Read each article. Under the following columns labeled “Main Ideas” are the topics in the article. In the “Details” section, write at least five (5) facts that you found to be important. Be sure to number each fact.

Topic:

Child Labor and the Industrial Revolution

Main Ideas

Details

Living Conditions: From Country to Town & Housing






















Environmental Conditions:

Pollution & Improvements























Working Conditions:

Child Labor & Coal Mines




















Topic:

Child Labor and the Industrial Revolution

Main Ideas

Details



Adolescent Conditions:

Street Children & Country Children























Factory/Mill Conditions:

Mills, Factories/Brick Works & Chimney Sweeps

























Child Labor-Two Column Notes/Tier 2

Directions: : Read each article. Under the following columns labeled “Main Ideas” are the topics in the article. In the “Details” section, write at least five (5) facts that you found to be important. Be sure to number each fact.


Topic:

Child Labor and the Industrial Revolution

Main Ideas

Details

Living Conditions: From Country to Town & Housing






  1. The wages of a farm worker were very low.

  2. In most housing, there was no running water or toilet.


















Environmental Conditions:

Pollution & Improvements


  1. Burning coal produced a lot of dirty, black smoke.

  2. Birmingham was one of the first cities to become healthier.















Working Conditions:

Child Labor & Coal Mines


  1. Many of the factory workers were children.

  2. Younger children often worked as trappers.
















Child Labor and the Industrial Revolution




Details


Adolescent Conditions:

Street Children & Country Children

  1. Mill owners often to in orphans to work in their workhouses.

  2. Children were employed in match factories to dip matches into a chemical called phosphorus.

  3. By 1832, it was forbidden by law for boys under the age of 12 to work sweeping chimneys.


















Living Conditions: From Country to Town & Housing



  1. Many street children worked as crossing sweepers.

  2. Poor families living in the countryside had to send their children out to work.





















Hewlett-Packard29-Apr-16


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