Topic: Medieval Europe and the Black Death in Asia, Europe and Africa (Depth Study: 4b and 6b) Stage 4



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History Program


TOPIC: Medieval Europe and the Black Death in Asia, Europe and Africa

(Depth Study: 4b and 6b)

Stage 4

Year 8

Duration:


10 weeks

Detail:


21 hours/ 25 lessons

Historical Context of the Overview – Spend two lessons on this overview, this will give the students some knowledge of the world they will be looking at and then will be expanded upon in subsequent lessons. Teacher introduces and explains the Feudal System using a pyramid structure to show the hierarchy of society, each aspect of the pyramid highlights the proportion of society who exists at each level. The Feudal system will be revisited throughout the Medieval Europe aspect of this topic.

Provide students with a series of key dates and events in the Medieval world e.g. Gregory the Great becomes Pope, 638: Arab Army captures Jerusalem, 711- Arabs and Berbers invade Spain, 800 Charlemagne is crowned Holy Roman Emperor, 1066 Battle of Hastings, 1099 The First Crusade, 1117 Oxford University is founded, 1118 Knights Templar are founded to protect Jerusalem, 1189 Richard I ascends English Throne, 1189 The Third Crusade, 1215 Magna Carta, 1347 Emergence of the Black Death in Europe, 1378 The Western Schism, 1431 Trial and Execution of Joan D’Arc, 1492 Columba’s reaches the New World. This timeline will be used and built upon throughout the course. Using an online tool such as Google Maps Engine or an A3 World Map have students plot the known world. These timelines and maps will be referred to and developed throughout the course so that students can observe and understand change overtime and see the development of their knowledge.




Key Inquiry Questions

Historical Skills


  • How did societies change from the end of the ancient period to the beginning of the modern age?

  • What key beliefs and values emerged and how did they influence societies?

  • What were the causes and effects of contact between societies in this period?

  • Which significant people, groups and ideas from this period have influenced the world today?

  • Comprehension: chronology, terms and concepts (ACHHS205, ACHHS148, ACHHS206, ACHHS149)

  • Perspectives and interpretations (ACHHS212, ACHHS155)

  • Empathetic understanding (ACHHS212, ACHHS155)

  • Research (ACHHS207, ACHHS150, ACHHS208, ACHHS151)

  • Explanation and communication (ACHHS213, ACHHS156, ACHHS214, ACHHS157)


Key Framing Questions for this unit of work -

Conceptual Questions -


Content Questions –

a) How did trade between Europe and Asia affect those societies?

b) How did the role of the church and the feudal system change throughout this period?

c) What influences did the expansion of Islam have on Medieval European society?

d) How did the Black Death change peoples understanding of hygiene and medicine?


a) How did Medieval European society change as a result of the Black Death?

b) What was the significance of religion on Medieval life?



c) How has the Medieval world influenced our world today?


Outcomes -

Historical Concepts -


A student:

  • describes major periods of historical time and sequences events, people and societies from the past HT4-2

  • describes and assesses the motives and actions of past individuals and groups in the context of past societies HT4-3

  • describes and explains the causes and effects of events and developments of past societies over time HT4-4

  • identifies the meaning, purpose and context of historical sources HT4-5

  • uses evidence from sources to support historical narratives and explanations HT4-6

  • identifies and describes different contexts, perspectives and interpretations of the past HT4-7

  • locates, selects and organises information from sources to develop an historical inquiry HT4-8

  • uses a range of historical terms and concepts when communicating an understanding of the past HT4-9

  • selects and uses appropriate oral, written, visual and digital forms to communicate about the past HT4-10

Related Life Skills outcomes: HTLS-3, HTLS-4, HTLS-5, HTLS-6, HTLS-7, HTLS-8, HTLS-9, HTLS-10, HTLS-11, HTLS-12, HTLS-13

Selected Life Skills Outcomes:


A student:

  • demonstrates an understanding of time and chronology HTLS-2

  • investigates how people lived in various societies from the past HTLS-3

  • explores the features of a particular society or time HTLS-4

  • uses sources to understand the past HTLS-8

  • selects and uses a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information about the past HTLS-13

The following historical concepts are integrated into the lesson sequences:

Continuity and change: changes and continuities in the Medieval Period

Cause and effect: what role did the Black Death play in changing Medieval society

Perspectives: different points of view about the Medieval period

Empathetic understanding: why people of the Medieval Period lived and thought as they did

Significance: the significance of the Medieval period



Key Historical Terms & Concepts

Site Study


  • Feudal system

  • Monasticism

  • Plague

  • Crusade

  • Christendom

  • Moor

  • Serf

  • Infidel

  • Papacy

  • Muslim

  • Manor

  • Page

  • Abbey

  • Abbot

  • Abbess

  • Heretic

  • Heresy

  • Flagellant

  • Motte and Bailey

  • Pilgrimage

  • Treasures of Heaven – British Museum

  • The Art of Devotion in the Middle Ages

  • V&A Medieval

  • Pilgrimage in Medieval Europe


Resources

Resources –

Books –


Aylett, J. (1991). Medieval realms 1066-1500. 1st ed. London: Hodder & Stoughton.

Dawson, I. (1992). The Crusades. 1st ed. Oxford University Press.

Kernaghan, P. (1993). [Schülerbd.]. 1st ed. Cambridge: Univ. Press [u.a.].

Langley, A., Brightling, G. and Dann, G. (1996). Medieval life. 1st ed. London: Dorling Kindersley.

Macdonald, F. and Peppé, M. (1995). How would you survive in the Middle Ages?. 1st ed. London: Watts.

Macdonald, F. (2000). Women in medieval times. 1st ed. Lincolnwood (Chicago), ill.: Peter Bedrick Books.

Macdonald, F. (2006). Knights, castles, and warfare in the Middle Ages. 1st ed. Milwaukee, WI: World Almanac Library.

McMeans, J. (2010). Differentiated Lessons and Assessments. 1st ed. Moorabin: Hawker Brownlow Education.

Moss, M. and Wood, G. (1986). The crusades. 1st ed. Hove: Wayland.

Nichol, J. and Downton, D. (1981). The Middle Ages. 1st ed. Oxford: Blackwell.

Nicolle, D. (2000). The history of medieval life. 1st ed. London [England]: Chancellor Press.

Riley-Smith, J. (2009). What were the Crusades?. 1st ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.



Steele, P. (2006). The medieval world. 1st ed. London: Kingfisher.

Websites


  • British Museum

  • Medieval Life and Times

  • World History Maps

  • Make Your own Coat of Arms

  • Skwirk



Clickview


  • Going Medieval. (2012). David Hunt.

  • History through Literacy. (1998). Fabian-Baber.

  • Knights and Castles - Life Behind the Drawbridge. (1998). [DVD] Classroom Video.

  • Moments in Time: Curse of the Rat. (2003). Discovery Education.

  • The Worst Jobs in History: The Middle Ages. (2006). Nigel Walk.

  • When the Moors Rule Europe. (2005). Timothy Copestake.

  • Journey into the Dark Ages: The Black Death. (2013). Ken Follett's.

  • Timewatch: The Mystery of the Black Death. (2004). BBC.


Students with special needs:


Adjustments: the adjustments in this unit are suggestions only. Adjustments are measures or actions taken in relation to teaching, learning and assessment that enable a student with special education needs to access syllabus outcomes and content on the same basis as their peers. The types of adjustments made will vary according to the needs of the individual student.

Assessment: Students with special education needs should be provided with a range of opportunities to demonstrate achievement of identified outcomes. Evidence of achievement can be based on a range of assessment for learning experiences, such as observation during teaching and learning, work samples or planned assessment experiences. They will require adjustments to assessment practices in order to demonstrate what they know and can do in relation to syllabus outcomes and content. In some cases alternative assessment strategies may be needed. In this unit, an alternate assessment experience may be offered to the Formal assessment task – Museum Exhibition.

Assessment overview

Depth Study 4 & 6


Medieval Europe and the Black Death

Semester 1


Term 1, Week 6

Assessment for learning

Assessment as learning

Assessment of learning

  • Students create and present info-graphics – economic features of Medieval World

  • Writing of analytical paragraphs about Medieval disease

  • Student presentation to class about daily life of men, women and children in Medieval society

  • Visual representations – causes and symptoms of the black death

  • Source analysis – students create an ebook outlining their source analysis of the Third Crusade

  • Students create coats of arms to demonstrate their understanding of heraldry

  • Visual presentation of the significant changes in architecture

  • Students are able to look at the re-emergence of the flagellants as a consequence of the black death

  • Students ask questions that come out of student presentations

  • Students are able to work in a group to prepare presentations

  • Students are able to work independently to create a timeline on the events of the Medieval Period in Europe

  • Students work individually to complete an ebook on the third crusade

  • Students work independently to interpret and analysis sources and write an account of the impact of the black death

Weighting: 20%

Description of Task: Students present a museum exhibition with an audio commentary of sources relevant to a Medieval personality. They will present the sources visually and embed the audio commentary to show their understanding of the role of the selected personality played during the Medieval Period.



Outcomes: HT4-3, HT4-5, HT4-6, HT4-8, HT4-9


Content

Teaching and learning strategies


including opportunities for extension activities & adjustments

Assessment Strategies


Formative & Summative

The way of life in Medieval Europe (social, cultural, economic and political features) and the roles and relationships of different groups in society (ACDSEH008)

Students:

  • identify the extent and key sites of Medieval Europe

  • describe everyday life of men, women and children in Medieval European society

  • outline, key cultural, economic and political features of Medieval European society

  • identify the roles and relationships of key groups in Medieval European society, using a range of sources




Begin the topic of Medieval Europe and the Black Death by having students fill out a KWL chart on Life in the Middle Ages, they will revisit this at the conclusion of the unit of work.

  • Using the map begun in the overview have students plot significant sites of Medieval Europe and Kingdoms (Kingdom of England, Norway, Sweden, Kingdom of the Franks, Leon & Castille and the Holy Roman Empire.) on this map. This map can be referred to throughout the unit and added to when students start exploring the impact of the Black Death.

  • Class is divided into home groups with each look at the daily life:

    • Men: students compile the activities that each of the three estates would engage in. Clergy, Nobles and Knights, Peasants OR

    • Women: students compile the activities that Nuns and Noble woman and Peasant married women would engage in on a daily basis OR

    • Children: students compile the activities that children would engage in. Again students would need to look at children from different aspects of society, both noble and peasant children.

    • For each group include life expectancy

  • Student groups then present findings back to other home groups

Suggested Adjustment: consideration given to student groupings; assign group roles; provide text at appropriate levels for student to access

  • Political: Teacher introduces students to the concept of the feudal system (Skwirk animation), students create a poster explaining the hierarchy of the system and the role of individuals living under the feudal system.

  • Culture: Heraldry activity. Teacher introduces the concept of heraldry and its importance in Medieval society. Students design and explain their own coat of arms using the principles of Heraldry.

Suggested Adjustment: verbal explanation of their coat of arms http://www.makeyourcoatofarms.com/app.asp

  • Students write a series of journal entries showing how knights lived by the Code of Chivalry

Suggested Adjustment: present how knights lived in an alternate format such as a comic using Comic Life

  • Economic: Students create an infographic (What is an infographic?) on land use in Medieval Europe. Students are to show the landholdings by the King, his Lords and the Church. They should also show how the rise of towns affected land ownership over time.

  • Students design an estate marking: the church, manor, common pasture, fields, ponds and roads. They are to also include a three-year plan for the three-field crop rotation system.

Suggested Adjustment: focus on estate marking only





  • Teacher collects coats of arms and journal entries/ comics on Chivalry

  • Infographics can be displayed around the classroom and referred to later in the course when looking at impact of the plague.

Life Skills Content

The features of the ancient to modern world and how it is the same as or different to today



Students:

  • use the language of time to describe the ancient to modern world, eg 'a long time ago', BC/AD, BCE/CE n

  • compare the similarities and differences between the present day and the ancient to modern world, using ICT and other sources as appropriate cctict

How people lived in the ancient to modern world

Students:

  • recognise some features of a particular society

  • recognise some aspects of everyday life in a particular society

Life Skills Teaching and Learning strategies

  • Introduction to unit. Pre-teach key vocabulary of terms that will be used regularly in the unit such as plague, death etc. use visuals inn conjunction with the written word.

  • Build background knowledge by viewing a film or part of a film such as Robin Hood, A Knight’s Tale or video clips from Horrible Histories.

  • Student lists or verbally recalls items, clothes, transport they saw in the film/video clip that we do not use today.

  • Student sorts provided pictures or finds pictures on the internet of medieval scenes and scenes from the present into Past and Present

  • Ask student how do they know which picture is from the past and which is from the present?



  • Student participates in class group work activity on daily life for men, women and children as outlined above. Student is given as specific role within the group.

  • Give student pictures of jobs people did. Ask student to sort them according to who might have performed the job.

  • Student participates in class discussion of the feudal system (king, nobles, knights, peasants). Student labels pictures of each or pastes them into a pyramid showing the highest to the lowest in the feudal system.

  • Student participates in class discussion on Heraldry. They are provided with a template of a coat of arms and design one for themselves. http://www.makeyourcoatofarms.com/app.asp

Assessment of Life Skills

Observation of student sorting pictures into past/ present and jobs people perform



Outcomes assessed:

  • demonstrates an understanding of time and chronology HTLS-2

  • uses sources to understand the past HTLS-8

Living conditions and religious beliefs in the 14th century this is a specific focus at the final stage of the study, including life expectancy, medical knowledge and beliefs about the power of God (ACDSEH015)

Students:

  • locate the extent of human settlements in 14th-century Asia, Europe and Africa

  • describe the everyday life of men, women and children in the 14th century and life expectancy at this time

  • describe what doctors understood about diseases and their treatment in this period

  • outline what European people believed about religion and the power of God in this period

  • On the map students created at the start of the unit they are to add the extent of settlement in 14th Century Asia, Europe and Africa.

  • See above: link with: describe everyday life of men, women and children in Medieval European society

  • Teacher collates a number of images of common Medieval diseases. Project these images onto a screen/board and have a discussion with the class about the diseases and commonly understood methods of how these diseases were spread. Then have students research and record the common Medieval treatment for each of these diseases.

Extension activity Have students research and compare these diseases and cures with modern day diseases. Do the same diseases exist? How are they dealt with today?

Suggested Adjustment: scaffold provided to record research and disease treatment; oral/ visual recording of disease treatment

  • Students study the connection between Islamic and Western medicine and the rise of medical schools.

  • In point form students list the ways in which the Church dominated daily life and explain how the church was the only institution above the King.

  • Teacher provides an overview of the ways in which the Church became to be seen as corrupt and too influential in the 14th Century. Examples: King Phillip having Boniface VIII arrested and Clement V moving to Avignon. Rise of indulgences.



  • Teacher collections student work to review their understand of the living conditions

Life Skills Content

How people lived in the ancient to modern world



Students:

  • recognise some aspects of everyday life in a particular society/empire using one or more sources, eg stories, images, multimedia

  • explore the practices of a particular society/empire, using ICT and other sources as appropriate, eg roles of men and women, crime and punishment, warfare and defence systems iuictccdd

Life Skills Teaching and Learning strategies

  • Student views images of common medieval diseases with class and participates in class discussion on diseases and how these diseases were spread as above. Questions such as How do you know this person is sick? Which picture shows a person who is not sick? How do you know? Which person might be a doctor? How do you know? are asked. Student responses are noted.

  • Student chooses one disease to research: smallpox, dysentery, measles, typhus

  • Student chooses one activity to complete on the disease such as a poster about how to avoid the disease, a brochure on how to care for a person with the disease, a list of rules for the town to stop the spread of the disease, a digital text on the symptoms and treatment etc.

Assessment of Life Skills

  • Annotated notes on student’s contribution to class discussion.

  • Student’s chosen product on chosen disease

Outcomes assessed:

  • investigates how people lived in various societies from the past HTLS-3

  • selects and uses a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information about the past HTLS-13

The dominance of the Catholic Church (ACDSEH052)

Students:

  • identify ways in which the Catholic Church influenced life in Medieval Europe




  • Students examine the role of the Pope in European life and make notes on the changes in the way that the Pope was appointed. Students explore how Pope Gregory VII’s declaration that the ‘Pope had authority over Kings as they were God’s representative’ lead to conflict between the Pope and Kings.

Suggested Adjustment: notes could be provided to students or in the format of a cloze passage for students to fill in key vocabulary




Life Skills Content

The role of one or more significant people or events in a particular society



Students:

  • identify significant people and/or events of a particular society, empire and/or development, eg , the spread of the Black Death,

  • investigate one or more significant people and/or events of a particular society, empire and/or development, using ICT and other sources as appropriate ictl

Life Skills Teaching and Learning strategies

  • Student participates in class discussion on the role of the pope as outlined above. Student will focus on Pope Gregory VII

  • Student finds a picture of Pope Gregory VII and King Henry IV.

  • Student reads case study called, King vs Pope that looks at the conflict between Henry IV and Gregory VII. Support provided to read/access the text http://ww2.wyomingcityschools.org/~zollerjw/Q3Files/NB08PapalPower.pdf

  • Student completes the think questions, orally or written.




Significant developments and/or cultural achievements, such as changing relations between Islam and the West (including the Crusades), architecture, medieval manuscripts and music (ACDSEH050)

Students:

  • identify and describe significant developments and/or cultural achievements of Medieval Europe in at least ONE of the following areas: architecture, art, medieval manuscripts, literature and music

  • explain the changing relations between Islam and the West during the medieval era, including the Crusades

  • using a range of sources, outline what is revealed about different perspectives on the Crusades

  • Students create a timeline indicating:

    • the Crusades.

    • Romanesque and Gothic architectural periods

    • Spread of Islam into Europe.

  • Teacher provides students with a range of sources depicting various examples of medieval architecture. Teacher explains the differences between Romanesque and Gothic Architecture highlighting the major differences.

  • Students prepare a PowerPoint presentation on the importance of architecture and the Church in Medieval Europe. Students are to choose an example of a Romanesque and Gothic Cathedral and using sources explain the developments in architecture during this period and how Gothic influenced the building of churches. Teachers can use Chartres Cathedral as an example of both Romanesque and Gothic architecture.

Extension activity: students could use an ICT tool such as Sketchup Make or Minecraft to design a Gothic Cathedral and explain their design.

Suggested Adjustment: partially completed timeline used; students find examples of medieval architecture and they comment on the similarities and differences

  • On the map students started at the beginning of the topic, they indicate the areas of Islamic territory at the time of the third crusade.

  • Students are guided through the significance of the Islamic occupation of the Iberian Peninsula. Students make notes on the influence of the following on the West:

    • The House of Wisdom

    • Translation of Islamic texts in Toledo’s Library

    • How did relations between Islam and the West change throughout the Crusades?

  • Using sources students create a ebook outlining the Third crusade from both Christian and Islamic perspectives. Tools such as iBooks author or Comic Life could be used to create the ebook.

Suggested Adjustment: notes are provided to students, ebook made from one perspective only

  • PowerPoint presentations are presented to the class as evidence of learning and understanding of the changes in Medieval Architecture



  • Teacher marks ebooks as evidence of interpretation and evaluation of sources as well as the ability to select appropriate communication forms.




Life Skills Content

The role of one or more significant people or events in a particular society



Students:

  • identify significant people and/or events of a particular society, empire and/or development, eg , the spread of the Black Death,

  • investigate one or more significant people and/or events of a particular society, empire and/or development, using ICT and other sources as appropriate ictl

The location and geographical features of a particular society, empire and/or historical development

Students:

  • use a map to identify significant locations of a society, empire and/or development, eg cities, trade routes, invasions, explorations n




Life Skills Teaching and Learning strategies

  • Teacher explanation of crusades. The Crusades were Holy Wars. Student watches the video on the crusades and compete the online accompanying activity:http://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/ks3/history/middle_ages/the_crusades/video/

  • Student uses a map to mark the different countries where the crusades occurred. They match this with a time line of the crusades by colour coding the map with corresponding crusades.

  • Student looks at artworks featuring scenes from the crusades. Discussion on what it might have been like to be part of the crusades and to be a knight.

  • Student creates an advertising poster or visual to convince peasants to join the Crusades. They consider that peasants believed that if they were to die fighting in the Crusades, their soul would be automatically saved; peasants could be free of their lords and nobles while on Crusade and the Crusade offered peasants an adventure. Student locates on their map the best places for their posters to be used.

  • Student research one significant person from the times of the crusades such as Joan of Arc, Peter the Hermit, William the Conqueror, William Wallace (Braveheart), Robin Hood. They choose one crusader and design a Fakebook page for the person. http://www.classtools.net/FB/home-page

  • Student adds to their map the places their crusader travelled to.

Assessment of Life Skills

  • Teacher observation and annotated notes on student’s discussion on the crusades and development of map

  • Crusade poster

  • Crusader Fakebook page

Outcomes assessed:

  • demonstrates an understanding of time and chronology HTLS-2

  • selects and uses a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information about the past HTLS-13

Continuity and change in society in ONE of the following areas: crime and punishment; military and defence systems; towns, cities and commerce (ACDSEH051)

Students:

  • outline the main features of at least ONE of the following:

    • crime and punishment

    • military and defence systems

    • towns, cities and commerce

  • describe the ways your chosen topic changed or remained the same

  • Teacher introduces the concept of Medieval defence systems at the time of Norman invasion into Britain:

    • Castles

    • Weapons

    • Types of warfare

  • Students compare and contrast Motte and Bailey Castles with Stone Keep castles and Concentric Castles. They are to describe the differences between each and how and why they changed over time. Students should also refer to the ability of each type of castle to survive a siege. http://www.historyonthenet.com/Medieval_Life/types_of_castle.htm Clickview: Knights and Castles: Life Behind the Drawbridge

Suggested Adjustment: graphic organiser provided to students to compare and contrast

  • Students research the following Medieval battles:

    • the Battle of Hastings, England (1066)

    • the Battle of Bannockburn, Scotland (1314)

    • the Battle of Agincourt, France (1415)

  • Students describe the following from each battle the types of:

    • weapons

    • armour

    • soldiers (infantry/cavalry)

    • warfare techniques used

  • In what ways did military and defence systems change or remain the same between 1066 and 1415?

Suggested Adjustment: students choose one battle to research




Life Skills Content

How people lived in the ancient to modern world



Students:

  • recognise some features of a particular society/empire, eg housing

  • recognise some aspects of everyday life in a particular society/empire using one or more sources, eg stories, images, multimedia

  • investigate one or more aspects of everyday life in a particular society/empire, using ICT and other sources as appropriate

Life Skills Teaching and Learning strategies

  • Student listens to teacher’s whole class introduction of Medieval defence systems: Castles, Weapons, Types of warfare as outlines above

  • Students use the interactive medieval castle to explore which groups of people live where http://www.kidsonthenet.com/castle/view.html. Students complete the accompanying scaffold to record their findings. Students explore the parts of a castle and complete the online activity http://www.2diyarchive.co.uk/2010/02/parts-of-a-castle.html

  • Students compare different aspects of daily life in medieval times with current day practices. The following online activity will support students. Students provided with a scaffolds to record their findings. http://www.imaginon.org/fun/whippingboy/medmod.asp?themeid=2&activityid=11

Assessment of Life Skills

  • Teacher observation and annotated notes

  • Completed scaffolds on castles and medieval vs modern day

Outcomes assessed:

  • investigates how people lived in various societies from the past HTLS-3

  • explores the features of a particular society or time HTLS-4

  • selects and uses a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information about the past HTLS-13

The role of expanding trade between Europe and Asia in the Black Death, including the origin and spread of the disease (ACDSEH069)

Students:

  • outline the extent of trade between Europe and Asia in the 14th century

  • explain how trade and travel contributed to the outbreak and spread of the Black Death

  • Start with a mapping exercise identifying the trade routes between Europe and Asia and the connection with the spread of the Black Death. Students:

    • on students map indicate the trade routes between the two continents.

    • then create an infographic depicting the extent of this trade.

  • Students explore the origins and spread of the Black Death. They then create a comic strip using a software package such as Comic Life to explain the causes of the Black Death and how trade and travel between Asia and Europe contributed to the spread of the Black Death.

Suggested Adjustment: students explore the causes of the Black Death using Comic Life; provide text at appropriate reading level with access to speak/ read functionality




The causes and symptoms of the Black Death and the responses of different groups in society to the spread of the disease, such as the flagellants and monasteries (ACDSEH070)

Students:

  • describe the causes and symptoms of the Black Death

  • use sources to identify common treatments of the disease and discuss their effectiveness

  • outline responses of social groups to the spread of the disease, including flagellants and the impact on monasteries

  • Students create a poster directed at people living in Medieval towns about the supposed causes and symptoms of the Black Death. Students are to include the precautions that Medieval people took to avoid contracting the Black Death.

  • Using sources introduce students to health and medicine in the Medieval Period through the use of images. A google image search for treatment of diseases returns good images when the search term Medieval is included. Project sources onto board for the class to annotate with questions and suggestions as to what the treatments may have been used to cure.

  • Students research with guidance the re-emergence of flagellants with the rise of the Black Death and assess the impact the Black Death had on the demise of monasteries.

Suggested Adjustment: completed posters shown as models and examples; question matrix used to support students to ask quality questions about picture sources of health and medicine; research scaffolds provided; provide text at appropriate reading level with access to speak/ read functionality

Teacher observes students constructing and revising their maps.

Comic strips are collected and marked. These can be displayed around the class for students to observe and learn from others work.




The effects of the Black Death on Asian, European and African populations, and conflicting theories about the impact of the plague (ACDSEH071)

Students:

  • assess the impact of the Black Death on Asian, European and African societies

  • • using a range of sources, discuss different interpretations of the impact of the Black Death on European society

  • Students mark on their map the progression of the Black Death from Asia into Europe and Africa.

  • Provide students with a range of source material about the impact of the Black Death on European society. Students write letters from different perspectives and locations about the impact of the Black Death.

    • Perspectives:

    • Towns or city

    • Nun or Priest

    • Manor Lord

    • Knight

    • Courtier

    • Peasant

    • Doctor

  • After analysing multiple sources including textbook, internet and library resources and compare the reported death figures of the Black Death. Students write an account of why there are such varying accounts of the impact of the Black death in Europe

Suggested Adjustment: students choose one perspective on the Black Death and can present their knowledge in an alternate formats - oral, written, visual or digital forms; consideration given to the sources materials provided to students;




Other immediate and long-term effects of the Black Death, including labour shortages, peasant uprisings, the weakening of feudal structures, and increased social mobility (ACDSEH072)

Students:

  • describe short-term and long-term effects of the Black Death on medieval societies

  • assess the role of the Black Death in breaking down the feudal system in Europe

  • discuss how Medieval Europe has influenced the world today

  • In small groups students explore and evaluate the short-term effects of the plague including the impact of labour shortages and peasant revolts to the longer-term impacts that weakened the feudal system and how this affected the church and monasteries.

  • With the social upheavals that the Black Death caused throughout Europe who were the winners and losers. Consider peasants, nobility, church and monasteries.

  • As a class draw together these reasons and the impact that each had on European society.

  • Complete the KWL chart begun in the first lesson of the unit.







Life Skills Content

The role of one or more significant people or events in a particular society



Students:

  • identify significant people and/or events of a particular society, empire and/or development, eg , the spread of the Black Death,a

The location and geographical features of a particular society, empire and/or historical development

Students:

  • use a map to identify significant locations of a society, empire and/or development, eg cities, trade routes, invasions, explorations n




Life Skills Teaching and Learning strategies

  • Student participates in class discussions and small group work as outlined above

  • Student can watch video clip: History Turing Points: the Black Plague http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kScxc9DPrnY. Black Plague fact sheet provided to student or access to a website with appropriate text.

  • Student discussion on what is the Black Death, its symptoms and treatment. Students explore the timeline and map of the spread of the Black Death and complete activities in Mediveal Realms Special Needs Support Material http://www.hoddereducation.co.uk/media/Documents/History%20Community/Medieval%20Realms%20SNSM/09-M-Realms-Sect-6-The-Black-Death.pdf

  • Student creates a poster directed at people living in Medieval towns about the supposed causes and symptoms of the Black Death. Student are to include the precautions that Medieval people took to avoid contracting the Black Death. Scaffold and appropriate sources provided to student

Assessment of Life Skills

  • Black Death poster

Outcomes assessed:

  • uses sources to understand the past HTLS-8

  • selects and uses a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information about the past HTLS-13

The role of significant individuals (ACDSEH052)

Students:

  • using a range of sources, investigate and assess the role of significant medieval individuals, eg Charlemagne, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Saladin, William Wallace or Joan of Arc

  • use sources to identify different perspectives on the chosen individuals

  • See Formal assessment task

  • Students complete a reflection of the course incorporating their KWL chart. Students are to evaluate their performance in the formal assessment task as well as the new knowledge and skills that they gain through completing this topic.

Suggested Adjustment: an alternate assessment experience may be offered instead of the formal assessment task for some students with special needs.




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Teaching and Learning Program Evaluation

Program or Unit Title: Class: Teacher:

Element

Evaluation

Program


  • Was the program well-structure and coherent?

  • To what extent did the program engage all students in the class?

  • Did the program assist all students to achieve the learning outcomes?

  • What improvements could be made?



Resources


  • Were the resources used appropriately in terms of age level, variety and the ability to engage the students?

  • What improvements could be made?



Assessment


  • Did the program incorporate a range of quality, valid assessment tasks?

  • Reflect and comment on the level of student achievement in this program.

  • What improvements could be made to assist students to achieve the outcomes?




Date Commenced: Date Completed: Signature:

This unit of work was written by Trent McAllan, Saint Ignatius’ College, Riverview. Copyright © of the unit of work is owned by AISNSW. logo_in blue_pms540u

NSW syllabus content prepared by the Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational Standards NSW for and on behalf of the State of New South Wales is protected by Crown copyright. |


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