To those who will use this reading list: Please bear in mind that this is a beginner’s list, and by no means represents a complete picture of the spectrum of Germanic magic from ancient times up to the present



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To those who will use this reading list:

Please bear in mind that this is a beginner’s list, and by no means represents a complete picture of the spectrum of Germanic magic from ancient times up to the present. This reading list is meant to help the beginner establish a solid foundation which can later be built upon with further texts and magical experiments. May you meet with success.
-Hildolf Von Eisenwald

Mythology (Cosmology & Cosmogony)
The first part of any schedule of initial Runework should, by necessity, begin with an education in the cultural cosmology and cosmogony in which the Runes are at home; this is accomplished by reading and gaining a working familiarity of the myths found in the the Poetic and Prose Eddas. This cannot be accomplished by merely reading an occult author’s opinions or interpretations of the myths as part of their treatment(s) on Runic or other heathen Germanic magical practices; these myths must be internalized so that they may “speak” to the aspiring vitki, aiding them in unlocking the mysteries that are the Runes, which will, in time, lead to a greater understanding of the myths (which will, in feedback fashion, further aid in unlocking the Runes.) The first books on the Eddas that are recommended for the beginner are:
The Norse MythsKevin Crossley-Holland

New York: Random House, 1980

-This book is a “plain English” compilation of a great many of the myths found within the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda. In my experience, it is the best place for beginners to start to build a working familiarity with the cosmology, cosmogony, and the various races of Yggdrasill.
Edda – Snorri Sturluson (Translated by Anthony Faulkes)

Vermont: Everyman (Charles E. Tuttle), 1987

-This book is a “plain English” translation of the Prose Edda, which contains the Skaldskaparmal, an invaluable resource for understanding (and later creating) the poetic devices known as kennings.
Magic
These are the “fundamentals” where texts on Germanic Magic are concerned, which are focused on the 24 Rune Elder Futhark. While some are critical of these texts because of the author’s (Edred Thorsson) personal history, they remain the best ones publicly available.
Futhark: A Handbook of Rune Magic – Edred Thorsson

Maine: Samuel Weiser, 1984



- This book is a primer for many of the “fundamental” practices of rune magic such as Stodhur and Galdor, as well as providing information on various equipment used in active practice.
Runelore: A Handbook of Esoteric Runology – Edred Thorsson

Maine: Samuel Weiser, 1987



-This book is to theory what _Futhark_ is to practice. It contains several sections on the history of runic practices spanning from the Elder period to the modern day. Included in this text are the Old Norwegian Rune Rhyme, the Old Icelandic Rune Poem, and the Old English Rune Poem, all potent keys to unlocking the mysteries of the runes.
Runecaster's Handbook: At The Well of Wyrd –Edred Thorsson

Maine: Samuel Weiser, 1999



This book contains various techniques for using the Elder Futhark for divinatory purposes. The interpretations of “bright” and “murk” staves also provide ideas of how each of the runes could possibly be used in operant magic.


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