To prepare you to learn in and contribute to an information-oriented world, this yearlong course will provide a detailed overview of United States history from the country’s beginnings to the post-World War II era



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US HISTORY—Syllabus
2012-2013

Course Overview

To prepare you to learn in and contribute to an information-oriented world, this yearlong course will provide a detailed overview of United States history from the country’s beginnings to the post–World War II era. You will gain insight into the forging of the new nation, the sectional conflicts that nearly tore it apart, and the Civil War and Reconstruction. You will learn about nineteenth-century industrialization and urbanization, the growth of the West and the “New South,” and political efforts to reform capitalism. You will also analyze the effects of the Great Depression and the New Deal, the Cold War and the United States’ role as a world power, and more recent challenges such as movements for equality, environmental issues, and global terrorism. As a class, we will investigate and interpret past events, learn collaboratively, encourage personal ownership of learning, and apply what we have learned to real-world situations.



Course Content (Units of Study)



Process Skills

Colonization and Forging a New Nation



B. Building a Nation (Colonization–ca. 1877)

1. Colonization and Forging a New Nation

a.

Identify the reasons for colonization, evaluate its impacts, and analyze the success or failure of settlements in North America

b.

Analyze religious development and its significance in colonial America (e.g., religious settlements, the Great Awakening)

c.

Describe significant aspects of the variety of social structures of colonial America

d.

Compare the economies of the various colonies, and analyze the development and impact of indentured servitude and African slavery in North America (e.g., social, political, and economic)

e.

Explain the origins and development of colonial governments

Creating a Nation




f.

Evaluate the influence of Enlightenment ideas on the development of American government as embodied in the Declaration of Independence

g.

Identify and evaluate the ideas and events that contributed to the outbreak of the American Revolution, and determine the key turning points of the war

h.

Identify the impetus for the Constitutional Convention (limitations of government under the Articles of Confederation), and analyze the events and outcomes of the Convention (i.e., the “bundle of compromises”)

i.

Interpret the ideas and principles expressed in the U.S. Constitution

j.

Explain the development of the Bill of Rights, and assess various debates of the day

m.


Evaluate, take, and defend positions on the development of U.S. foreign policy during the early nineteenth century (e.g., Embargo Act, Monroe Doctrine)

Antebellum America



k.

Identify and evaluate the political and territorial changes resulting from westward expansion of the United States in the early nineteenth century

l.

Analyze and evaluate federal and state policies toward American Indians in the first half of the nineteenth century

2. Antebellum America

a.

Describe and evaluate the impacts of the First Industrial Revolution during the nineteenth century (e.g., the Lowell system, immigration, changing technologies, transportation innovations)

b.

Identify and evaluate the major events and issues that promoted sectional conflicts and strained national cohesiveness in the antebellum period

c.

Identify significant religious, philosophical, and social reform movements of the nineteenth century and their impact on American society

d.

Identify the major characteristics of the abolition movement in the antebellum period, its achievements, failures, and Southern opposition to it

e.

Analyze the women’s rights and the suffrage movements and the impact of women on other reform movements in the antebellum period

f.

Compare and contrast the economic, social, and cultural differences of the North and South during the antebellum period

Civil War and Reconstruction



B. Building a Nation (Colonization–ca. 1877) (continued)

3. Civil War and Reconstruction

a.

Identify and analyze the technological, social, and strategic aspects of the Civil War

b.

Explain the influence of Abraham Lincoln’s philosophy of the Union and his executive actions and leadership on the course of the Civil War

c.

Describe the basic provisions and immediate impact of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution

d.

Evaluate different Reconstruction plans and their social, economic, and political impact on the South and the rest of the United States

Industrialization and Urbanization



C. Rebuilding a Nation (ca. 1877–ca. 1914)

1. Industrialization and Urbanization

a.

Evaluate the impact of new inventions and technologies of the late nineteenth century

b.

Identify and evaluate the influences on business and industry in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries

c.

Identify labor and workforce issues of the late nineteenth century, including perspectives of owners/managers and Social Darwinists

d.

Explain the challenges and contributions of immigrants of the late nineteenth century

e.

Explain the causes and impact of urbanization in the late nineteenth century

f.

Compare and contrast the experiences of African Americans in various U.S. regions

Reintegration of the South/Incorporation of the West



e.

Analyze the immediate and long-term influences of Reconstruction on the lives of African Americans and U.S. society as a whole

f.

Compare and contrast the experiences of African Americans in various U.S. regions in the late nineteenth century

g.

Identify and evaluate the influences on the development of the American West

h.

Analyze significant events for Native American Indian tribes, and their responses to those events, in the late nineteenth century

a.

Identify and explain significant issues and components of the Populist movement and their impacts

Increasing Influences and Challenges



b.

Explain the origins and accomplishments of the Progressive movement

c.

Analyze the efforts to achieve women’s suffrage in the early twentieth century

d.

Evaluate, take, and defend positions on the various U.S. foreign policies in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries

e.

Analyze the causes and consequences of the Spanish-American War

f.

Identify and evaluate the factors that influenced U.S. imperialism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and the ensuing debate over imperialism

The United States in a Changing World



D. Challenges at Home and Abroad (ca. 1914–1945)

1. The United States in a Changing World

a.

Identify and analyze the causes and significant events of World War I and their impact; evaluate the impact of the Treaty of Versailles

b.

Describe and evaluate the impact of scientific and technological innovations of the 1920s

c.

Identify and evaluate the impact of new cultural movements on American society in the 1920s

d.

Identify the characteristics of social conflict and social change that took place in the early 1920s

e.

Identify and explain the economic factors that contributed to the stock market crash of 1929 and the Great Depression

f.

Explain the economic, environmental, and social impact of the Great Depression on American society

g.

Evaluate the impact of the New Deal on various elements of American society (e.g., social, political, environmental, economic)

America at War



E. America Since World War II (1945–Present)

1. America at War

a.

Describe circumstances at home and abroad prior to U.S. involvement in World War II

b.

Identify the significant military and political aspects of World War II

c.

Analyze dimensions of the Holocaust and the Allies’ response to the Holocaust and war crimes

d.

Evaluate the social, political, and economic impacts of World War II on the home front

e.

Identify and evaluate the scientific and technological developments in America during and after World War II

Changes at Home



E. America Since World War II (1945–Present) (continued)

2. Changes at Home

a.

Analyze major domestic issues and responses of the administrations from Truman to present

b.

Evaluate the impact of innovations in technology and communication on American society

c.

Identify the events and influential individuals of the civil rights, human rights, and counterculture movements and assess their impact

d.

Evaluate the impact of changes in the national economy on contemporary American society

e.

Identify the major contemporary social, environmental, and political issues (e.g., immigration, global

Post-War Foreign Policy



f.

Analyze the social, cultural, and economic changes at the onset of the Cold War era

g.

Analyze the origins of the Cold War, foreign policy developments, and major events of the administrations from Truman to present

h.

Describe and evaluate the political and social impact of the Vietnam War

e.

Identify the major contemporary social, environmental, and political issues (e.g., immigration, global warming, terrorism), the groups involved, and the controversies engendered by those issues

f.

Assess increasing global interdependence, the potential for conflict, and the U.S. role in world events in the present and future


Course Materials

Pens and/or pencils


lined paper and/or notebook

3-ring binder and/or folder to organize materials and graded papers


Textbook

The American Republic since 1877. Glencoe, Mc-Graw Hill.
Course Policies

If you approach this class with a positive attitude, respect for your classmates, and a sense of responsibility, you will be successful! My expectations for you are listed below. Make sure you review these expectations carefully and know that I will hold you to these standards of behavior.



Respect: Every person in this class will be given an equal opportunity to express himself or herself in class discussions, group work, writings, etc. Individuals may dress differently, have different beliefs, or communicate in different ways, but I expect you to treat each classmate with respect. In a discussion, a variety of opinions often surface. While you will not be asked to change your way of thinking, you will be expected to listen to others with respect and to express your personal opinions in a respectful manner. If you disagree with someone’s viewpoint, you are free to challenge them. However, please take time to consider your classmates’ opinions. The ability to weigh different perspectives and a willingness to change one’s ideas based on the presentation of new evidence are essential skills in today’s information age.

Behavior: I expect all students to:



Be in class on time.

Come prepared for class with required materials.

Respect your teacher and classmates.

Limit unnecessary trips out of the classroom. (3 passes per quarter)

Turn off and do not use cell phones and electronic devices during class.

Turn work in on time.

Actively participate in class discussions.

Accept an academic challenge.


School Policies: Any rule stated in the Student Handbook is, of course, a rule in this classroom as well. Please be very familiar with all school rules and policies.

Absences: If you have an unplanned absence from school, please see me immediately upon your return to class to obtain any makeup work. You may also e-mail me to find out assignment details. When possible, I will e-mail attachments to you. Regardless of the situation, please talk to me personally when you return.

Late Work: For excused absences (i.e. illnesses, emergencies, appointments, school activities, parental notes), there will be no penalty for late work as long as the work is completed within one or two days of your return. For more extended absences due to illness (documented by a doctor’s note), late work must be completed within one week of your return. For unexcused absences (skipping, no note from parents) or for work not completed on time, your score will be automatically reduced by 50 percent.

Plagiarism/Cheating: Please do not abuse that trust by being dishonest. Learning cooperatively is great, and I encourage students to get together to brainstorm and discuss assignments. When you sit down to complete an individual assignment, however, let the work be yours alone. Penalties for cheating and plagiarism are stiff. If a paper is obviously copied, whether from a classmate’s work, a book, or an online source, it will receive no credit.

Grading Policy

A+

100–99

B+

92–91

C+

84–83

D+

74–73

F

64-50

A

98–94

B

90–86

C

82–77

D

72–67

F-

Below 49

A–

93

B–

85

C–

76–75

D–

66–65








Additional Information

Questions and Help: If you have questions regarding your schoolwork or need extra help, you have a number of options. You can see me after class, by appointment before or after school, during your study hall if I am not teaching that period, and/or you may e-mail me.

Signature(s): Discuss this course syllabus with your parent(s) or guardian(s). Please sign and return to me by Monday (8/15). I am looking forward to working with you this year.

I, ______________________ (Student), have read and understand the US History course syllabus and the course expectations.

I, ______________________ (Parent/Guardian), have read and understand the US History course syllabus and the course expectations.

Student Signature: ___________________________________Date:_____________



Parent/Guardian Signature: ____________________________Date:_____________

PLEASE PLACE THIS DOCUMENT IN YOUR CLASS NOTEBOOK FOR FUTURE REFERENCE.


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