Title 63G. General Government



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Title 63G. General Government


Chapter 1
State Symbols and Designations



Part 1
General Provisions



63G-1-101 Title.

(1) This title is known as “General Government.”

(2) This chapter is known as “State Symbols and Designations.”


Enacted by Chapter 382, 2008 General Session




Part 2
State Language



63G-1-201 Official state language.

(1) English is declared to be the official language of Utah.

(2) As the official language of this State, the English language is the sole language of the government, except as otherwise provided in this section.

(3) Except as provided in Subsection (4), all official documents, transactions, proceedings, meetings, or publications issued, conducted, or regulated by, on behalf of, or representing the state and its political subdivisions shall be in English.

(4) Languages other than English may be used when required:

(a) by the United States Constitution, the Utah State Constitution, federal law, or federal regulation;

(b) by law enforcement or public health and safety needs;

(c) by public and higher education systems according to rules made by the State Board of Education and the State Board of Regents to comply with Subsection (5);

(d) in judicial proceedings, when necessary to insure that justice is served;

(e) to promote and encourage tourism and economic development, including the hosting of international events such as the Olympics;

(f) by libraries to:

(i) collect and promote foreign language materials; and

(ii) provide foreign language services and activities; and

(g) by the Utah Educational Savings Plan established under Title 53B, Chapter 8a, Utah Educational Savings Plan.

(5) The State Board of Education and the State Board of Regents shall make rules governing the use of foreign languages in the public and higher education systems that promote the following principles:

(a) non-English speaking children and adults should become able to read, write, and understand English as quickly as possible;

(b) foreign language instruction should be encouraged;

(c) formal and informal programs in English as a Second Language should be initiated, continued, and expanded; and

(d) public schools should establish communication with non-English speaking parents of children within their systems, using a means designed to maximize understanding when necessary, while encouraging those parents who do not speak English to become more proficient in English.

(6) Unless exempted by Subsection (4), all state funds appropriated or designated for the printing or translation of materials or the provision of services or information in a language other than English shall be returned to the General Fund.

(a) Each state agency that has state funds appropriated or designated for the printing or translation of materials or the provision of services or information in a language other than English shall:

(i) notify the Division of Finance that the money exists and the amount of the money; and

(ii) return the money to the Division of Finance.

(b) The Division of Finance shall account for the money and inform the Legislature of the existence and amount of the money at the beginning of the Legislature’s annual general session.

(c) The Legislature may appropriate any money received under this section to the State School Board for use in English as a Second Language programs.

(7) Nothing in this section affects the ability of government employees, private businesses, nonprofit organizations, or private individuals to exercise their rights under:

(a) the First Amendment of the United States Constitution; and

(b)Utah Constitution, Article 1, Sections 1 and 15.

(8) If any provision of this section, or the application of any such provision to any person or circumstance, is held invalid, the remainder of this act shall be given effect without the invalid provision or application.


Amended by Chapter 46, 2011 General Session
Amended by Chapter 342, 2011 General Session




Part 3
State Holidays



63G-1-301 Legal holidays -- Personal preference day -- Governor authorized to declare additional days.

(1)

(a) The following-named days are legal holidays in this state:

(i) every Sunday;

(ii) January 1, called New Year’s Day;

(iii) the third Monday of January, called Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day;

(iv) the third Monday of February, called Washington and Lincoln Day;

(v) the last Monday of May, called Memorial Day;

(vi) July 4, called Independence Day;

(vii) July 24, called Pioneer Day;

(viii) the first Monday of September, called Labor Day;

(ix) the second Monday of October, called Columbus Day;

(x) November 11, called Veterans’ Day;

(xi) the fourth Thursday of November, called Thanksgiving Day;

(xii) December 25, called Christmas; and

(xiii) all days which may be set apart by the President of the United States, or the governor of this state by proclamation as days of fast or thanksgiving.

(b) If any of the holidays under Subsection (1)(a), except the first mentioned, namely Sunday, falls on Sunday, then the following Monday shall be the holiday.

(c) If any of the holidays under Subsection (1)(a) falls on Saturday the preceding Friday shall be the holiday.

(d) Each employee may select one additional day, called Personal Preference Day, to be scheduled pursuant to rules adopted by the Department of Human Resource Management.

(2)

(a) Whenever in the governor’s opinion extraordinary conditions exist justifying the action, the governor may:

(i) declare, by proclamation, legal holidays in addition to those holidays under Subsection (1); and

(ii) limit the holidays to certain classes of business and activities to be designated by the governor.

(b) A holiday may not extend for a longer period than 60 consecutive days.

(c) Any holiday may be renewed for one or more periods not exceeding 30 days each as the governor may consider necessary, and any holiday may, by like proclamation, be terminated before the expiration of the period for which it was declared.


Renumbered and Amended by Chapter 382, 2008 General Session




Part 4
State Commemorative Periods



63G-1-401 Commemorative periods.

(1) The following days shall be commemorated annually:

(a) Bill of Rights Day, on December 15;

(b) Constitution Day, on September 17;

(c) Yellow Ribbon Day, on the third Monday in May, in honor of men and women who are serving or have served in the United States Armed Forces around the world in defense of freedom;

(d) POW/MIA Recognition Day, on the third Friday in September;

(e) Indigenous People Day, on the Monday immediately preceding Thanksgiving;

(f) Utah State Flag Day, on March 9;

(g) Vietnam Veterans Recognition Day, on March 29; and

(h) Utah History Day at the Capitol, on the Friday immediately following the fourth Monday in January, to encourage citizens of the state, including students, to participate in activities that recognize Utah’s history.

(2) The Department of Veterans’ and Military Affairs shall coordinate activities, special programs, and promotional information to heighten public awareness and involvement relating to Subsections (1)(c) and (d).

(3) The month of October shall be commemorated annually as Italian-American Heritage Month.

(4) The month of November shall be commemorated annually as American Indian Heritage Month.

(5) The month of April shall be commemorated annually as Clean Out the Medicine Cabinet Month to:

(a) recognize the urgent need to make Utah homes and neighborhoods safe from prescription medication abuse and poisonings by the proper home storage and disposal of prescription and over-the-counter medications; and

(b) educate citizens about the permanent medication disposal sites in Utah listed on useonlyasdirected.org that allow disposal throughout the year.

(6) The first full week of May shall be commemorated annually as State Water Week to recognize the importance of water conservation, quality, and supply in the state.

(7) The second Friday and Saturday in August shall be commemorated annually as Utah Fallen Heroes Days to:

(a) honor fallen heroes who, during service in the military or public safety, have sacrificed their lives to protect the country and the citizens of the state; and

(b) encourage political subdivisions to acknowledge and honor fallen heroes.

(8) The third full week in August shall be commemorated annually as Drowsy Driving Awareness Week to:

(a) educate the public about the relationship between fatigue and driving performance; and

(b) encourage the Department of Public Safety and the Department of Transportation to recognize and promote educational efforts on the dangers of drowsy driving.

(9) The third full week of June shall be commemorated annually as Workplace Safety Week to heighten public awareness regarding the importance of safety in the workplace.


Amended by Chapter 80, 2014 General Session
Amended by Chapter 86, 2014 General Session
Amended by Chapter 92, 2014 General Session
Amended by Chapter 123, 2014 General Session




Part 5
State Flag



63G-1-501 State flag.

          The state flag of Utah shall be a flag of blue field, fringed, with gold borders, with the following device worked in natural colors on the center of the blue field:

          The center a shield; above the shield and thereon an American eagle with outstretched wings; the top of the shield pierced with six arrows arranged crosswise; upon the shield under the arrows the word “Industry,” and below the word “Industry” on the center of the shield, a beehive; on each side of the beehive, growing sego lilies; below the beehive and near the bottom of the shield, the word “Utah,” and below the word “Utah” and on the bottom of the shield, the figures “1847”; with the appearance of being back of the shield there shall be two American flags on flagstaffs placed crosswise with the flag so draped that they will project beyond each side of the shield, the heads of the flagstaffs appearing in front of the eagle’s wings and the bottom of each staff appearing over the face of the draped flag below the shield; below the shield and flags and upon the blue field, the figures “1896”; around the entire design, a narrow circle in gold.




Renumbered and Amended by Chapter 382, 2008 General Session




Part 6
State Symbols



63G-1-601 State symbols.

(1) Utah’s state animal is the elk.

(2) Utah’s state bird is the sea gull.

(3) Utah’s state centennial astronomical symbol is the Beehive Cluster located in the constellation of Cancer the Crab.

(4) Utah’s state centennial star is Dubhe, one of the seven bright stars composing the Big Dipper in the constellation Ursa Major.

(5) Utah’s state centennial tartan, which honors the first Scots known to have been in Utah and those Utahns of Scottish heritage, shall have a pattern or repeating-half-sett of white-2, blue-6, red-6, blue-4, red-6, green-18, red-6, and white-4 to represent the tartan worn anciently by the Logan and Skene clans, with the addition of a white stripe.

(6) Utah’s state cooking pot is the dutch oven.

(7) Utah’s state emblem is the beehive.

(8) Utah’s state emblem of service and sacrifice of lives lost by members of the military in defense of our freedom is the “Honor and Remember” flag, which consists of:

(a) a red field covering the top two-thirds of the flag;

(b) a white field covering the bottom one-third of the flag, which contains the words “honor” and “remember”;

(c) a blue star overlaid by a gold star with a thin white border in the center of the flag spanning the red field and the white field; and

(d) a representation of a folded United States flag beneath the blue and gold stars with three tongues of flame emanating from its top point into the center of the gold star.

(9) Utah’s state firearm is the John M. Browning designed M1911 automatic pistol.

(10) Utah’s state fish is the Bonneville cutthroat trout.

(11) Utah’s state flower is the sego lily.

(12) Utah’s state folk dance is the square dance, the folk dance that is called, cued, or prompted to the dancers and includes squares, rounds, clogging, contra, line, and heritage dances.

(13) Utah’s state fossil is the Allosaurus.

(14) Utah’s state fruit is the cherry.

(15) Utah’s state vegetable is the Spanish sweet onion.

(16) Utah’s historic state vegetable is the sugar beet.

(17) Utah’s state gem is topaz, as is prominently found in the Thomas Mountain Range in Juab County, Utah.

(18) Utah’s state grass is Indian rice grass.

(19) Utah’s state hymn is “Utah We Love Thee” by Evan Stephens.

(20) Utah’s state insect is the honeybee.

(21) Utah’s state mineral is copper.

(22) Utah’s state motto is “Industry.”

(23) Utah’s state railroad museum is Ogden Union Station.

(24) Utah’s state rock is coal.

(25) Utah’s state song is “Utah This is the Place” by Sam and Gary Francis.

(26) Utah’s state tree is the quaking aspen.

(27) Utah’s state winter sports are skiing and snowboarding.


Amended by Chapter 46, 2014 General Session




Part 7
Display of Flags by a Government Entity



63G-1-701 Title.

          This part is known as “Display of Flags by a Government Entity.”




Enacted by Chapter 90, 2013 General Session



63G-1-702 Definitions.

          As used in this part:

(1) “Capitol hill complex” is as defined in Section 63C-9-102.

(2)

(a) “Flag” means a depiction or emblem made from fabric or cloth.

(b) “Flag” does not include a depiction or emblem made from:

(i) lights;

(ii) paint;

(iii) roofing;

(iv) siding;

(v) paving materials;

(vi) flora;

(vii) balloons; or

(viii) any other building, landscaping, or decorative component other than fabric or cloth.

(3) “Flag of the United States” is the flag described in United States Code Title 4, Chapter 1, The Flag.

(4) “POW/MIA flag” means the POW/MIA flag of the National League of Families of American Prisoners and Missing in Southeast Asia.


Enacted by Chapter 90, 2013 General Session



63G-1-703 Display of POW/MIA flag.

(1) In any place at the capitol hill complex where the United States flag is displayed out of doors, the entity responsible for the display of the United States flag shall display the POW/MIA flag, in the manner described in Subsection (2), from sunrise to sunset on the following days:

(a) Armed Forces Day, the third Saturday in May;

(b) Memorial Day, the last Monday in May;

(c) Flag Day, June 14;

(d) Independence Day, July 4;

(e) Veteran’s Day, November 11; and

(f) National POW/MIA Recognition Day, the third Friday in September.

(2) When displaying the POW/MIA flag under Subsection (1), the entity responsible to display the flag shall fly or hang the POW/MIA flag as follows:

(a) if the United States flag and the POW/MIA flag are attached to the same flag pole, by placing the POW/MIA flag directly under the United States flag; or

(b) if the United States flag and the POW/MIA flag are displayed near each other, but not on the same flag pole, by placing the top of the POW/MIA flag below the top of the United States flag.


Enacted by Chapter 90, 2013 General Session





Chapter 2
Government Records Access and Management Act



Part 1
General Provisions



63G-2-101 Title.

          This chapter is known as the “Government Records Access and Management Act.”




Renumbered and Amended by Chapter 382, 2008 General Session



63G-2-102 Legislative intent.

(1) In enacting this act, the Legislature recognizes two constitutional rights:

(a) the public’s right of access to information concerning the conduct of the public’s business; and

(b) the right of privacy in relation to personal data gathered by governmental entities.

(2) The Legislature also recognizes a public policy interest in allowing a government to restrict access to certain records, as specified in this chapter, for the public good.

(3) It is the intent of the Legislature to:

(a) promote the public’s right of easy and reasonable access to unrestricted public records;

(b) specify those conditions under which the public interest in allowing restrictions on access to records may outweigh the public’s interest in access;

(c) prevent abuse of confidentiality by governmental entities by permitting confidential treatment of records only as provided in this chapter;

(d) provide guidelines for both disclosure and restrictions on access to government records, which are based on the equitable weighing of the pertinent interests and which are consistent with nationwide standards of information practices;

(e) favor public access when, in the application of this act, countervailing interests are of equal weight; and

(f) establish fair and reasonable records management practices.


Renumbered and Amended by Chapter 382, 2008 General Session



63G-2-103 Definitions.

          As used in this chapter:

(1) “Audit” means:

(a) a systematic examination of financial, management, program, and related records for the purpose of determining the fair presentation of financial statements, adequacy of internal controls, or compliance with laws and regulations; or

(b) a systematic examination of program procedures and operations for the purpose of determining their effectiveness, economy, efficiency, and compliance with statutes and regulations.

(2) “Chronological logs” mean the regular and customary summary records of law enforcement agencies and other public safety agencies that show:

(a) the time and general nature of police, fire, and paramedic calls made to the agency; and

(b) any arrests or jail bookings made by the agency.

(3) “Classification,” “classify,” and their derivative forms mean determining whether a record series, record, or information within a record is public, private, controlled, protected, or exempt from disclosure under Subsection 63G-2-201(3)(b).

(4)

(a) “Computer program” means:

(i) a series of instructions or statements that permit the functioning of a computer system in a manner designed to provide storage, retrieval, and manipulation of data from the computer system; and

(ii) any associated documentation and source material that explain how to operate the computer program.

(b) “Computer program” does not mean:

(i) the original data, including numbers, text, voice, graphics, and images;

(ii) analysis, compilation, and other manipulated forms of the original data produced by use of the program; or

(iii) the mathematical or statistical formulas, excluding the underlying mathematical algorithms contained in the program, that would be used if the manipulated forms of the original data were to be produced manually.

(5)

(a) “Contractor” means:

(i) any person who contracts with a governmental entity to provide goods or services directly to a governmental entity; or

(ii) any private, nonprofit organization that receives funds from a governmental entity.

(b) “Contractor” does not mean a private provider.

(6) “Controlled record” means a record containing data on individuals that is controlled as provided by Section 63G-2-304.

(7) “Designation,” “designate,” and their derivative forms mean indicating, based on a governmental entity’s familiarity with a record series or based on a governmental entity’s review of a reasonable sample of a record series, the primary classification that a majority of records in a record series would be given if classified and the classification that other records typically present in the record series would be given if classified.

(8) “Elected official” means each person elected to a state office, county office, municipal office, school board or school district office, local district office, or special service district office, but does not include judges.

(9) “Explosive” means a chemical compound, device, or mixture:

(a) commonly used or intended for the purpose of producing an explosion; and

(b) that contains oxidizing or combustive units or other ingredients in proportions, quantities, or packing so that:

(i) an ignition by fire, friction, concussion, percussion, or detonator of any part of the compound or mixture may cause a sudden generation of highly heated gases; and

(ii) the resultant gaseous pressures are capable of:

(A) producing destructive effects on contiguous objects; or

(B) causing death or serious bodily injury.

(10) “Government audit agency” means any governmental entity that conducts an audit.

(11)

(a) “Governmental entity” means:

(i) executive department agencies of the state, the offices of the governor, lieutenant governor, state auditor, attorney general, and state treasurer, the Board of Pardons and Parole, the Board of Examiners, the National Guard, the Career Service Review Office, the State Board of Education, the State Board of Regents, and the State Archives;

(ii) the Office of the Legislative Auditor General, Office of the Legislative Fiscal Analyst, Office of Legislative Research and General Counsel, the Legislature, and legislative committees, except any political party, group, caucus, or rules or sifting committee of the Legislature;

(iii) courts, the Judicial Council, the Office of the Court Administrator, and similar administrative units in the judicial branch;

(iv) any state-funded institution of higher education or public education; or

(v) any political subdivision of the state, but, if a political subdivision has adopted an ordinance or a policy relating to information practices pursuant to Section 63G-2-701, this chapter shall apply to the political subdivision to the extent specified in Section 63G-2-701 or as specified in any other section of this chapter that specifically refers to political subdivisions.

(b) “Governmental entity” also means:

(i) every office, agency, board, bureau, committee, department, advisory board, or commission of an entity listed in Subsection (11)(a) that is funded or established by the government to carry out the public’s business; and

(ii) as defined in Section 11-13-103, an interlocal entity or joint or cooperative undertaking.

(c) “Governmental entity” does not include the Utah Educational Savings Plan created in Section 53B-8a-103.

(12) “Gross compensation” means every form of remuneration payable for a given period to an individual for services provided including salaries, commissions, vacation pay, severance pay, bonuses, and any board, rent, housing, lodging, payments in kind, and any similar benefit received from the individual’s employer.

(13) “Individual” means a human being.

(14)

(a) “Initial contact report” means an initial written or recorded report, however titled, prepared by peace officers engaged in public patrol or response duties describing official actions initially taken in response to either a public complaint about or the discovery of an apparent violation of law, which report may describe:

(i) the date, time, location, and nature of the complaint, the incident, or offense;

(ii) names of victims;

(iii) the nature or general scope of the agency’s initial actions taken in response to the incident;

(iv) the general nature of any injuries or estimate of damages sustained in the incident;

(v) the name, address, and other identifying information about any person arrested or charged in connection with the incident; or

(vi) the identity of the public safety personnel, except undercover personnel, or prosecuting attorney involved in responding to the initial incident.

(b) Initial contact reports do not include follow-up or investigative reports prepared after the initial contact report. However, if the information specified in Subsection (14)(a) appears in follow-up or investigative reports, it may only be treated confidentially if it is private, controlled, protected, or exempt from disclosure under Subsection 63G-2-201(3)(b).

(15) “Legislative body” means the Legislature.

(16) “Notice of compliance” means a statement confirming that a governmental entity has complied with a records committee order.

(17) “Person” means:

(a) an individual;

(b) a nonprofit or profit corporation;

(c) a partnership;

(d) a sole proprietorship;

(e) other type of business organization; or

(f) any combination acting in concert with one another.

(18) “Private provider” means any person who contracts with a governmental entity to provide services directly to the public.

(19) “Private record” means a record containing data on individuals that is private as provided by Section 63G-2-302.

(20) “Protected record” means a record that is classified protected as provided by Section 63G-2-305.

(21) “Public record” means a record that is not private, controlled, or protected and that is not exempt from disclosure as provided in Subsection 63G-2-201(3)(b).

(22)

(a) “Record” means a book, letter, document, paper, map, plan, photograph, film, card, tape, recording, electronic data, or other documentary material regardless of physical form or characteristics:

(i) that is prepared, owned, received, or retained by a governmental entity or political subdivision; and

(ii) where all of the information in the original is reproducible by photocopy or other mechanical or electronic means.

(b) “Record” does not mean:

(i) a personal note or personal communication prepared or received by an employee or officer of a governmental entity:

(A) in a capacity other than the employee’s or officer’s governmental capacity; or

(B) that is unrelated to the conduct of the public’s business;

(ii) a temporary draft or similar material prepared for the originator’s personal use or prepared by the originator for the personal use of an individual for whom the originator is working;

(iii) material that is legally owned by an individual in the individual’s private capacity;

(iv) material to which access is limited by the laws of copyright or patent unless the copyright or patent is owned by a governmental entity or political subdivision;

(v) proprietary software;

(vi) junk mail or a commercial publication received by a governmental entity or an official or employee of a governmental entity;

(vii) a book that is cataloged, indexed, or inventoried and contained in the collections of a library open to the public;

(viii) material that is cataloged, indexed, or inventoried and contained in the collections of a library open to the public, regardless of physical form or characteristics of the material;

(ix) a daily calendar or other personal note prepared by the originator for the originator’s personal use or for the personal use of an individual for whom the originator is working;

(x) a computer program that is developed or purchased by or for any governmental entity for its own use;

(xi) a note or internal memorandum prepared as part of the deliberative process by:

(A) a member of the judiciary;

(B) an administrative law judge;

(C) a member of the Board of Pardons and Parole; or

(D) a member of any other body charged by law with performing a quasi-judicial function;

(xii) a telephone number or similar code used to access a mobile communication device that is used by an employee or officer of a governmental entity, provided that the employee or officer of the governmental entity has designated at least one business telephone number that is a public record as provided in Section 63G-2-301;

(xiii) information provided by the Public Employees’ Benefit and Insurance Program, created in Section 49-20-103, to a county to enable the county to calculate the amount to be paid to a health care provider under Subsection 17-50-319(2)(e)(ii);

(xiv) information that an owner of unimproved property provides to a local entity as provided in Section 11-42-205; or

(xv) a video or audio recording of an interview, or a transcript of the video or audio recording, that is conducted at a Children’s Justice Center established under Section 67-5b-102.

(23) “Record series” means a group of records that may be treated as a unit for purposes of designation, description, management, or disposition.

(24) “Records committee” means the State Records Committee created in Section 63G-2-501.

(25) “Records officer” means the individual appointed by the chief administrative officer of each governmental entity, or the political subdivision to work with state archives in the care, maintenance, scheduling, designation, classification, disposal, and preservation of records.

(26) “Schedule,” “scheduling,” and their derivative forms mean the process of specifying the length of time each record series should be retained by a governmental entity for administrative, legal, fiscal, or historical purposes and when each record series should be transferred to the state archives or destroyed.

(27) “Sponsored research” means research, training, and other sponsored activities as defined by the federal Executive Office of the President, Office of Management and Budget:

(a) conducted:

(i) by an institution within the state system of higher education defined in Section 53B-1-102; and

(ii) through an office responsible for sponsored projects or programs; and

(b) funded or otherwise supported by an external:

(i) person that is not created or controlled by the institution within the state system of higher education; or

(ii) federal, state, or local governmental entity.

(28) “State archives” means the Division of Archives and Records Service created in Section 63A-12-101.

(29) “State archivist” means the director of the state archives.

(30) “Summary data” means statistical records and compilations that contain data derived from private, controlled, or protected information but that do not disclose private, controlled, or protected information.


Amended by Chapter 265, 2015 General Session



63G-2-104 Administrative Procedures Act not applicable.

          Title 63G, Chapter 4, Administrative Procedures Act, does not apply to this chapter except as provided in Section 63G-2-603.




Renumbered and Amended by Chapter 382, 2008 General Session



63G-2-105 Confidentiality agreements.

          If a governmental entity or political subdivision receives a request for a record that is subject to a confidentiality agreement executed before April 1, 1992, the law in effect at the time the agreement was executed, including late judicial interpretations of the law, shall govern access to the record, unless all parties to the confidentiality agreement agree in writing to be governed by the provisions of this chapter.




Renumbered and Amended by Chapter 382, 2008 General Session



63G-2-106 Records of security measures.

          The records of a governmental entity or political subdivision regarding security measures designed for the protection of persons or property, public or private, are not subject to this chapter. These records include:

(1) security plans;

(2) security codes and combinations, and passwords;

(3) passes and keys;

(4) security procedures; and

(5) building and public works designs, to the extent that the records or information relate to the ongoing security measures of a public entity.


Renumbered and Amended by Chapter 382, 2008 General Session



63G-2-107 Disclosure of records subject to federal law.

          Notwithstanding the provisions of Subsections 63G-2-201(6)(a) and (b), this chapter does not apply to a record containing protected health information as defined in 45 C.F.R., Part 164, Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information, if the record is:

(1) controlled or maintained by a governmental entity; and

(2) governed by 45 C.F.R., Parts 160 and 164, Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information.


Renumbered and Amended by Chapter 382, 2008 General Session



63G-2-108 Certification of records officer.

          Each records officer of a governmental entity or political subdivision shall, on an annual basis, successfully complete online training and obtain certification from state archives in accordance with Section 63A-12-110.




Enacted by Chapter 377, 2012 General Session







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