Third Nine Weeks



Download 30.79 Kb.
Date conversion29.04.2016
Size30.79 Kb.

Higley Unified School District AZ US History Grade 11

Revised November 2012





Third Nine Weeks

Emergence of the Modern United States (Duration 4 - 5 Weeks)

Big Ideas:

  1. The expansion of industry resulted in the growth of big business and prompted laborers to form unions to better their lives.

  2. Immigration from Europe, Asia reached a new high in the late 1900’s.

  3. The rapid growth of cities forced people to contend with problems of housing, transportation, water and sanitation.

  4. Local and national political corruption in the 19th century led to calls for reform.

  5. Political, economic and social change in the late 19th century America led to broad progressive reforms.

  6. As a result of social and economic change, many women entered public life as workers and reformers.

  7. World War I spurred social, political, and economic change in the United States.

  8. European leaders opposed most of Wilson’s peace plan, and the US Senate failed to ratify the peace treaty.

Essential Questions:

  1. How did U.S. policies affect the indigenous people?

  2. How do new political values change the way people view the role of government?

  3. How are individual rights protected and social justice promoted within the context of majority rule?

  4. Of the many reform movements occurring during the Progressive Era, which reform movement had the most positive, lasting impact on society to this day?

  5. How did the end of WWI lead to global conflict?

Vocabulary

  • Populism

  • Monopolies

  • Trust

  • Muckrakers

  • Imperialism

  • Progressives

  • Red Scare

  • Suffrage

  • Robber Barons

  • Tammany Hall

  • Spoils system

  • Zimmerman Telegram

  • Isolationism

  • Versailles Treaty




Strand

Concept

PO

Standards: Priority (PS)/ Supporting (SS) / Interdisciplinary (IS)

HUSD Support Materials & Resources




C7

PO5

(PS) Describe the impact of the following aspects of the Industrial Revolution on the United States:

  • transportation improvements (e.g., railroads, canals, steamboats)

  • factory system manufacturing

  • urbanization

  • inventions (e.g., telegraph, cotton gin, interchangeable parts)




*In both Quarter 2 and Quarter 3




C7

PO1

(PS) Analyze how the following aspects of industrialization transformed the American economy beginning in the late 19th century:

  • mass production

  • monopolies and trusts (e.g., Robber Barons, Taft- Hartley Act)

  • economic philosophies (e.g., laissez faire, Social Darwinism, free silver)

  • labor movement (e.g., Bisbee Deportation)

  • trade

US & AZ History Resources




C7

PO2

(PS) Assess how the following social developments influenced American society in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries:

  • Civil Rights issues

  • changing patterns in Immigration

  • urbanization and social reform

  • mass media

  • consumerism

  • Roaring Twenties

US & AZ History Resources




C7

PO3

(PS) Analyze events which caused a transformation of the United States during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries:

  • Imperialism

  • Progressive Movement, Corruption and Teddy Roosevelt

  • World War I

  • Red Scare/Socialism

  • Populism

  • Indian Wars (e.g., Little Bighorn, Wounded Knee)











Great Depression (Duration 4 – 6 Weeks)

Big Ideas:

  1. As the prosperity of the 1920s ended, severe economic problems gripped the nation.

  2. During the Great Depression Americans did what they had to do to survive.

  3. After becoming president, Franklin Delano Roosevelt used government programs to combat the Depression.




Essential Questions:

  1. Does government have a responsibility to help the disadvantaged?

  2. Do the roots of the Great Depression still exist today?

  3. Can the government have too much power during a time of crisis?




Vocabulary

  • Harlem Renaissance

  • Prohibition

  • Dust Bowl

  • “Hooverville”

  • "Bank Holiday"

  • New Deal

  • Relief, Recovery, Reform




Strand

Concept

PO

Standards: Priority (PS)/ Supporting (SS) / Interdisciplinary (IS)

HUSD Support Materials & Resources




C8

PO1

(PS) Describe causes and consequences of the Great Depression:

  • economic causes of the Depression

  • Dust Bowl

  • effects on society

  • changes in expectations of government (e.g., New Deal programs)




US & AZ History Resources



Arizona Department of Education Common Core Standards

Grade

Cluster

Standard

Common Core Standards

Explanations & Examples

HUSD Support Materials & Resources

11

R




  • Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.




  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).




The standard asks students to create a chain of causation which can be supported by details from the text. When such a chain cannot be clearly built, students are to acknowledge that causation is not complete and clear

US & AZ History Resources

11

W







  • Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s),




  • distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.




  • Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.



  • Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.



  • Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.



  • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented




The standard asks students to evaluate a primary source noting how its structure reinforces its meaning. Students identify the parts of text and how they work together as a whole. They identify thesis statements, supporting details, and conclusions, as well as transition statements. They recognize the power of voice and diction in texts.

US & AZ History Resources

11

R




  • Evaluate authors’ differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors’ claims, reasoning, and evidence.




  • Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.




  • Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.




The standard requires the use of writing that is appropriate to a specific task, purpose, and audience.

a. The standard requires the use of writing that is appropriate to a specific practical task and its audience.



US & AZ History Resources

11

W




  • Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.




  • Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.




  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).




This standard addresses students developing and strengthening their writing through the writing process with a focus on purpose and audience

US & AZ History Resources










  • Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content




  • Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s),




  • distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.




  • Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.














The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page