Third Army Battle Route from 1 August 1944 to 8 May 1945



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Third Army Battle Route

from 1 August 1944 to 8 May 1945



Week 40

30 April


The V Corps from the First Army took over responsibility for the sector on the right flank of the VIII Corps located along the Czechoslovak border. At the same time, it took over the command of the 1st and 97th Infantry Division. With the 6th Cavalry Group (Mechanized) on the left and the 97th Infantry Division on the right, the 1st Infantry Division took up positions on the line from Cheb to the area south of Adorf. The 9th Armored Division was withdrawn to the rear to serve as command reserves. Tank columns from the 11th Armored Division's Combat Commands “A” and “B” under the XII Corps attacked along the Corps' right flank to the southeast towards the Austrian border. Combat Command “”A reached the border in Wegscheid, where it quickly defeated the local defense. In the interim, Combat Command “B” neared the border in the Oberkappel area. It then halted and sent reconnaissance out to Grettenbach, while Combat Command “R” advanced to Wollaberg and secured the division's northern and western flanks. Battalions from the 26th Infantry Division's 104th Infantry Regiment reached positions beyond Hauzeberg. The 328th Infantry Regiment took up positions along the Ilz River and built a bridgehead at Strasskirchen. The 90th Infantry Division captured the wooded area on Czechoslovak soil east of Waldmünchen. The 13th Armored Division's Combat Command “R” under the XX Corps crossed the Isar River near Landau. Battalions from the 71st Infantry Division's 14th and 66th Infantry Regiments were deployed along the Isar River. The artillery opened direct fire against enemy troops entrenched in the hills on the opposite bank. Later, under the shroud of a smoke screen, assault battalions started to cross the river in assault motorboats and over two damaged railroad bridges while machinery was hauled across on cable ferries. Soldiers from both regiments secured and expanded the bridgehead to Zeholfing, Zulling, Usterling, and Landau, where combat engineers built a pontoon bridge overnight. The 80th Infantry Division's 318th Infantry Regiment used the railroad bridge in Mamming to cross the river and advance to Dingolfing. The 99th Infantry Division's 393rd Infantry Regiment under the III Corps started to cross the river near Landshut, while its sister 395th Infantry Regiment did the same near Moosburg. The 395th Regiment subsequently secured the Oberpolln – Langenpreising line and provided cover for 14th Armored Division tank units as they crossed the river. The 14th Armored Division's Combat Command “R” mopped up the northern section of Landshut and moved to Moosburg, where combat engineers built a pontoon bridge. Units from Combat Command A also crossed the pontoon bridge over the river and subsequently headed to the Mittel Isar Canal. Finally, Combat Command B also used the bridge to move across the river that night. After crossing the river, battalions from the 86th Infantry Division's 342nd and 343rd Infantry Regiments continued to the Mittel Isar Canal, which they crossed near Eitting. The attached 23rd Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron from the 16th Armored Division crossed the Isar River southwest of Freising.

1 May


The 97th Infantry Division under the V Corps, currently deployed along the German-Czechoslovak border, reinforced its positions and prepared for another attack. The 2nd Battalion from the division's 386th Infantry Regiment occupied Přimda, Bohuslav, Velké Dvorce, Labuť, and several other villages in the district of Tachov and in the foothills of the Bohemian Forest. At the same time, Col Francis H. Boos’ 38th Infantry Regiment from the 2nd Infantry Division commanded by Major General Walter M. Robertson moved from Grimm southwards, occupying the area near the Bavarian town of Waldmünchen. East of Peilstein, the 11th Armored Division’s Combat Command “A” under the XII Corps took charge of the bridge over the Mühl River and went on to attack Oepping. The Combat Command “B” sent reconnaissance out to the east and southeast to look for suitable sites for crossing the river, and Combat Command “R” moved to Kasberg. The 41st Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron headed out of Wildenranna to carry out reconnaissance at the Danube. The 26th Infantry Division's 104th Infantry Regiment commanded by Col Ralf A. Palladin crossed the Austrian border near Messnerschlag, while its sister 328th Infantry Regiment eliminated the last vestiges of the surrounded enemy’s resistance north of Passau. Advancing along the Czechoslovak border, the 2nd Cavalry Group (Mechanized) occupied the mountain pass at Železná Ruda (Eisenstein). The 2nd Battalion from the 90th Infantry Division's 358th Infantry Regiment occupied Chodov in the district of Domažlice that day. The 1st Battalion also made progress, entering Nemanice, Nová Huť, Stará Huť, Valtířov, and Nový Postřekov. Vanguard units from the 5th Infantry Division’s 10th Infantry Regiment also crossed the Czechoslovak border in the course of the day. The 4th Armored Division commanded by Major General William M. Hoge was attached to the Corps and started to prepare to deploy to the assembly area southeast of Regen. The 13th Armored Division’s Combat Command “B” under the XX Corps reached the Inn River at Eisenfelden, but it was unable to occupy the bridge at Marktl. Combat Command “A” reached the river at Braunau, and Combat Command “R” advanced to Untertürken. The 65th Infantry Division’s 261st Infantry Regiment headed along the Danube to Sandbach and Aldersbach, while its sister 259th Infantry Regiment mopped up the area between Osterhofen, Pleinting, Aldersbach, and Vilshofen. The 71st Infantry Division expanded the bridgehead over the Isar River to the southeast, from Landau to Eichendorf and Simbach. The 80th Division’s 318th Infantry Regiment mopped up Dingolfing. It later advanced to the southeast, crossed the Vils River and occupied Reisbach. The 319th Infantry Regiment crossed the Isar River at Nieder Viebach and its vanguard units advanced to Vils in the area west of Geisenhausen. The 99th Infantry Division under the III Corps finished crossing the Isar in Landshut, subsequently advancing to the Vilsbiburg – Velden line. Task Force “Pope”, composed of a motorized battalion from the 86th Infantry Division’s 342nd Infantry Regiment and the 16th Armored Division’s 23rd Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron, was created to attack Wasserburg and conquer the bridge over the Inn River located in the town.

2 May


The regiments from the 1st and 97th Infantry Divisions carried out local attacks to improve their positions along the Czechoslovak border. The 2nd Battalion from the 97th Infantry Division’s 386th Infantry Regiment sent reconnaissance out to Mchov and Lužná. At that moment, the 2nd Infantry Division had been assigned to come under the command of the Corps and started to take over the 90th Infantry Division’s operational zone. In the course of the day, the 2nd Infantry Division’s 9th Infantry Regiment commanded by Col Philip D. Ginder moved from Winklarn to Neukirchen to prepare for their final surge – the entrance of “Indianhead” troops into Czechoslovakia. The division’s 38th Infantry Regiment took over the operational zone of the 90th Infantry Division’s 358th Infantry Regiment along the eastern edge of the tall, forested ridge that forms the border between southwestern Bohemia and Bavaria. The sector was over 12 miles wide and stretched from Valtířov to Maxov in the district of Domažlice. The 38th Infantry Regiment's 1st Battalion took up positions from Valtířov to Nový Postřekov, the 2nd Battalion was deployed around Klenčí pod Čerchovem and Chodov, and the 3rd Battalion remained behind as reserves in Hiltersreid. The 11th Armored Division’s Combat Command “A” under the XII Corps left Oepping and headed southwards, going through Rohrback to the Mühl River and fording across the river. Meanwhile, Combat Command “B” remained in Lembach and Combat Command “R” moved to Peilstein. Major General Willard S. Paul’s 26th Infantry Division advanced along the Danube to the southeast and reached the Mühl River. The 2nd Battalion from the 90th Infantry Division’s 359th Infantry Regiment moved on to Všeruby, while the 1st Battalion went through Česká Kubice to Filipova Hora and Havlovice. The 4th Armored Division’s Combat Command “A” started to move towards the borders with Czechoslovakia. It rode through Deggendorf, Deggenau, and Waltersdorf, temporarily halting its advance in Grattendorf. The 65th Infantry Division’s 261st Infantry Regiment under the XX Corps reached the Inn River at Passau and Neuhaus (across from Schärding). The regiment’s 2nd Battalion mopped up the greater part of Passau and, with artillery support, the 1st Battalion started to cross the river at Neuhausen. South of the city, the 65th Division’s 259th Infantry Regiment also reached the river. The 13th Armored Division’s Combat Command “A” swiftly defeated the defense of Braunau. Motorized battalions from the 71st Infantry Division’s 5th and 66th Infantry Regiments advanced to the Inn River near Egglfing and Ering and built a small bridgehead, while combat engineers immediately started to mop up the dams and prepare to cross the river. Units from the 80th Infantry Division's 318th and 319th Infantry Regiments reached the river near Braunau a Winhöring. The 14th Cavalry Group (Mechanized) under the III Corps advanced to Neuöting and made contact with units from the XX Corps. The 99th Infantry Division also neared the Inn River. The 14th Armored Division’s Combat Command “B” took charge of an intact bridge over the river southeast of Aschau, while Combat Command “A” advanced to the river near Mühldorf. Battalions from the 86th Infantry Division’s 341st and 343rd Infantry Regiments launched an attack to the southeast against Haag in Oberbayern, and Task Force “Pope” fought its way through to the outskirts of Wasserburg.

3 May


After dark, 2nd and 3rd Battalion troops from the 2nd Infantry Division’s 23rd Infantry Regiment under the V Corps reached the vicinity of Mutěnín in the district of Domažlice. Companies from its sister 1st Battalion advanced to Bělá nad Radbuzou, subsequently taking over the sector from the 97th Infantry Division’s 387th Infantry Regiment. The 11th Armored Division’s Combat Command “A” under the XII Corps neared Gramastetten and Rottenegg. Combat Command “B” crossed the Mühl River in Neufelden, continuing on to Zwettl an der Rodl and cutting off the main road to Linz. The 26th Infantry Division’s 328th Infantry Regiment continued to the southeast, the 101st Infantry Regiment commanded by Col Walter T. Scott mopped up the area on the division’s right flank and the 104th Infantry Regiment remained in its current positions. The 2nd Battalion from the 90th Infantry Division’s 357th Infantry Regiment occupied Jägershof, Červené Dřevo, and Liščí, and at 1830 hrs the battalion’s E Company entered Nýrsko in the district of Klatovy. Meanwhile, the 3rd Battalion occupied Hojsova Stráž, Zelená Lhota, Tremelovský dvůr, and Zadní Hamry. The village of Všeruby in the district of Domažlice surrendered to the 359th Infantry Regiment’s 2nd Battalion. The 4th Armored Division’s Combat Commands “A” and “B” moved to the assembly area near Regen, and Combat Command “R” took up positions near Schollenried. The 65th Infantry Division’s 261st Infantry Regiment commanded by Col William E. Carraway finished occupying Passau and occupying Schärding. It then made a swift advance towards the Austrian city of Linz and its vanguard units neared Waizenkirchen, while its sister 260th Infantry Regiment commanded by Col Frank Dunkley engaged in battle in the woods between Sandbach and Passau. The 13th Armored Division’s Combat Command “B” was ordered to withdraw from the bridgehead in Neuötting. Most of the units of the 71st Infantry Division crossed the Inn River at Erring and Egglfing am Inn and expanded the bridgehead, while the 66th Infantry Regiment advanced to Ried am Innkreis. The 80th Infantry Division reached Braunau, which had been occupied by units from the 13th Armored Division. Throughout the day, the 43rd Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron mopped up the zone leading to the Inn River along the Corps’ right flank.

4 May


Based on a First Army order, the V Corps and the 9th and 16th Armored Divisions were reassigned to Patton's Third Army at 1930 hrs. The 9th Armored Division assembled in the Weiden area, and the division’s Combat Command “A” was attached to the 1st Infantry Division as support for an attack on Carlsbad (Karlovy Vary). The 16th Armored Division, which was policing Nuremberg, was ordered to move to the Waidhaus area, where it took over the 4th Armored Division’s zone. The 2nd Infantry Division’s 9th Infantry Regiment under the US Third Army’s V Corps took over the operational zone of the 90th Infantry Division’s 359th Infantry Regiment that day. It was 1130 hrs when the 359th Regiment units halted in their new positions: the 1st Battalion in Červené Dřevo and Svatá Kateřina, the 2nd Battalion in the area around Hamry, and the 3rd Battalion in Všeruby and Myslív. The 2nd Battalion from the 2nd Infantry Division’s 23rd Infantry Regiment attacked Jadruž, while its sister 3rd Battalion secured the Hostouň – Poběžovice line. The Indianhead Division’s 38th Infantry Regiment took control of the new line running from Vlkanov to Nový Kramolín and Starý Postřekov. On May 4, 1945, the 16th Armored Division received orders to turn its zone in Nuremberg over to units from the 4th Infantry Division and deploy to the Waidhaus area. The enemy opened heavy fire out of the Linz-Urfahr industrial park against nearing tank columns from the XII Corps' 11th Armored Division. Combat Command “B” attacked Alterberg bei Linz, while the 41st Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron occupied Gallneukirchen, and the Combat Command “A” slowly advanced to the Gramastetten – Rottenegg line. It then rotated to the east and prepared to attack Linz-Urfahr from the north and east together with the 26th Infantry Division's 328th Infantry Regiment, which was commanded by Col Aloysius E. O’Flaherty and reinforced by a company of medium tanks. Despite heavy enemy anti-aircraft bombing out of Linz, fighter bombers from the XIX Tactical Air Command provided assistance to the 11th Armored Division’s Combat Command “A” in their attack on Linz. The 26th Infantry Division’s 104th Infantry Regiment swiftly moved to the southeast to the Corps’ right flank. At 1600 hrs, in the village of Všeruby in the sector of the 2nd Battalion from the 90th Infantry Division’s 359th Infantry Regiment, Division Commander Brigadier General Herbert L. Earnest met with the commander of the German 11th Panzer Division, General Wend von Wietersheim, to negotiate the conditions for surrender. infantry units finally started to arrive and the first horse-drawn carriages appeared. But this was already May 5, 1945 – the day a nationwide uprising started in Bohemia. But here in Všeruby, where history is closely intertwined with the present, the German 11th Panzer Division continued to surrender. All of the units from the 4th Armored Division were placed on full battle alert that day, and regiments from the 5th Infantry Division prepared to advance into Bohemia. Battalions from the 65th Infantry Division's 260th and 261st Infantry Regiments under the XX Corps finished crossing the Inn River in Neuhaus, and reaching Eferding on their way to Linz. Units from the 71st Infantry Division’s 5th, 14th and 66th Infantry Regiments attacked to the southeast to the Traun River, occupied Wels and Lambach, cut off the main road between the two towns, and took charge of the bridges. The 80th Infantry Division's 317th Infantry Division advanced to Vöcklabruck, and Task Force “Smith”, composed of the 80th Reconnaissance Troop and a tank unit, headed out to the southeast to Schwanenstadt. The 3rd Cavalry Group (Mechanized) crossed the Inn River in Braunau. At the same time, the 43rd Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron mopped up the area on the Corps’ west flank from the Inn River to Neumarkt, while the 3rd Squadron advanced to the Enns River and assisted 80th Infantry Division units eliminate footholds in Vöcklabruck.

5 May


Major General Clift Andrus’s 1st Infantry Division under the V Corps prepared to advance to the western Bohemian city of Carlsbad (Karlovy Vary). The 18th Infantry Regiment commanded by Col John Williamson improved its positions near Cheb, while its sister 16th Infantry Regiment’s 1st Battalion occupied Plesná and Šneky. At the same time, the 2nd Battalion won Starý Rybník, Vonšov, Vackovec, Hartoušov, Kaceřov, and Chlum Svaté Máří, and the 3rd Battalion headed for Kynšperk nad Ohří. The 97th Infantry Division commanded by Major General Milton B. Halsey launched an attack in the direction of Pilsen. The 2nd Battalion from the 97th Infantry Division’s 386th Infantry Regiment occupied Málkovice, Bor, Holostřevy, Čečkovice, Benešovice, and Stříbro. Other division units occupied Trstenice, Chodová Planá, and Planá. The 1st Battalion from the 2nd Infantry Division’s 9th Infantry Regiment advanced to Pocinovice, the 2nd Battalion moved on to Nýrsko and the 3rd Battalion liberated Kout na Šumavě and Kdyně southeast of Domažlice. That morning, the 2nd Battalion from the Indianhead Division's 23rd Infantry Regiment commanded by Col Jay B. Loveless occupied Stráž, Borek, Dehetnou, Bernartice, and Sychrov. That afternoon they continued on to liberate Bonětice, Bonětičky, Olešná, Strachovice, Racov, Darmyšl, and Staré Sedlo in the district of Tachov. Meanwhile, the 3rd Battalion mopped up Hostouň and occupied Štítary, Sedlec, Srby, Medná, and Svinná in the district of Domažlice. Regiment command was set up in Miřkov. The 2nd Infantry Division’s 38th Infantry Regiment started to advance to the northeast towards Horšovský Týn and Milavče. Not far from Otov, the enemy started shooting at the advancing American units using hand-held firearms and Panzerfaust anti-tank guns. That same day, the towns of Domažlice and Horšovský Týn were taken without a fight. The 16th Armored Division commanded by Brigadier General John L. Pierce deployed to Waidhaus and made plans to carry out an attack through the positions of the 97th Infantry Division towards Pilsen the next day. The 23rd Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron took up positions near Svatá Kateřina. Task Force A from the Combat Command “B” headed out of Waidhaus, reaching the vicinity of Bor at 2040 hrs, while the 396th Armored Field Artillery Battalion moved into the Nové Domky area. The 11th Armored Division’s Combat Command “A” under the XII Corps moved from the Gramastetten area into Zwettl and advanced to the hills near Urfahr-Linz. Task Force Wingard broke into Urfahr before noon and took control of the bridge over the Danube, its defenders quickly surrendering. Combat Command “B” sent patrols from the 41st Cavalry Squadron out of Gallneukirchen to the east and southeast to a rail line on the line agreed to by the US and Soviet Armies about 12 miles away. The 2nd Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron commanded by Lt Col Easton occupied Klatovy, where the local German garrison surrendered to the Americans. Part of the 42nd Squadron commanded by Lt Col Hargis headed for Prášily.

The 90th Infantry Division's 358th Infantry Regiment commanded by Col J. W. Bealke advanced along the route between Zwiesel and Železná Ruda. The regiment’s 1st Battalion assembled in the Paseka area, the 2nd Battalion near Dobrá Voda, and the 3rd Battalion neared Skelná (Glaserwald). The division’s 357th Infantry Regiment commanded by Col John H. Mason advanced through Železná Ruda. At Starý Brunst the regiment crossed the Křemelná River, and part of the 3rd Battalion's I Company headed for Zhůří, where part of Company fell into an ambush and lost twenty men, ten killed and ten injured. The 2nd Battalion advanced through Paseka and Dobrá Voda to Hartmanice. POWs from General Wend von Wietersheim’s 11th Panzer Division continued to be received in the zone of the 90th Division’s 359th Infantry Regiment commanded by Col Raymond E. Bell. In all, about 10,000 fully armed men surrendered, and over 1,200 vehicles of all types, including tanks, and stocks of arms and ammunition were secured. The 5th Infantry Division commanded by General Major Albert E. Brown crossed the Teplá Vltava River. The division’s 10th Infantry Regiment commanded by Col Robert P. Bell advanced in the direction of Freyung – Kunžvart – Horní Vltavice, taking charge of intact bridges in Lenora and Horní Vltavice. The division’s 2nd Infantry Regiment commanded by Col Walter R. Graham cut off the road leading between Volary and Kunžvart, while the 1st Battalion from Col Paul J. Black’s 11th Regiment headed out in the direction of Knížecí Pláně. In the meantime, the 2nd Battalion occupied Horní Světlé Hory. The 4th Armored Division patrolled the roads leading to the east and southeast and prepared for a planned May 6 attack on Prague. Fire support for the attack was to be provided by a 177th Artillery Group battery and the 276th Field Artillery Battalion attached to Combat Command “A”. Soldiers from the XX Corps built a defense line along the Enns River. Vanguard units from the 71st Infantry Division's 5th Infantry Regiment reached the Enns River at Steyr. Operating at the front of the 80th Infantry Division in Steyr, the 3rd Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron took charge of an intact bridge over the Enns, while the 43rd Squadron expanded its zone on the Corps’ right flank to Kamner an Attersee. The 80th Division, currently without the 318th Infantry Regiment which remained in positions south of Braunau, was deployed along the Enns River.


6 May
Operating on the left flank of the V Corps, the 1st Infantry Division launched an attack in the direction of Carlsbad. The division’s 26th Infantry Regiment commanded by Francis J. Murdoch occupied Luby, the 16th Infantry Regiment conquered Kynšperk and battalions from the 18th Infantry Regiment mopped up the villages of Prameny and Mnichov. Attached to the 1st Infantry Division, the 9th Armored Division's Combat Command “A” commanded by Brigadier General Thomas L. Harrold launched an attack through the positions of the 16th Infantry Regiment along the Cheb-Sokolov highway. The vanguard of the tank columns subsequently reached Rudolce. In the course of the day, the command of the 97th Infantry Division was set up in Tachov. At 0600 hrs, an attack was launched against Pilsen. The 16th Armored Division’s Combat Command “B” commanded by Col Charles H. Noble set out for Pilsen early that morning. Major George B. Pickett’s Task Force A, composed of the 64th Armored Infantry Battalion, Company A from the 16th Tank Battalion, Company B from the 23rd Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron, and platoons from the 16th Tank Battalion’s Company D and the 216th Armored Engineer Battalion’s Company B, led Combat Command “B” along highway No. 14 through Bor in the district of Tachov. Reconnaissance units from the 23rd Squadron encountered light enemy resistance in the village of Sulislav near Stříbro, but it was quickly quashed. At 0745 hrs, the 23rd Squadron’s Company B reached Skvrňany on the outskirts of Pilsen. Shortly after 8 a.m., the squadron’s vehicles stood in downtown Pilsen. One section from Task Force A occupied the airfield in Pilsen-Bory, taking about 600 German soldiers prisoner and seizing around 80 aircraft as well as vehicles and various military materiel. Another Task Force A unit occupied the Škoda munitions factory. At 14.15 surrendered to the commander of the German garrison in Pilsen, Gen. George von Majewski and after the signing of the surrender of the shot. After the occupation of the city were sent reconnaissance patrols along the road northeast of Pilsen - Karlovy Vary and formed the guard, that kept order in the city. The Combat Command "R" Colonel Thoss B.Becka arrived at 10.00 to Stankov, where they proceeded to Pilsen. The 2nd Battalion from the 97th Infantry Division’s 386th Infantry Regiment commanded by Col Samuel M. Lansing advanced on Pilsen and occupied Bdeněves, Kozolupy, Město Touškov, Čemíny, and Vejprnice. The command of the 2nd Infantry Division’s 9th Infantry Regiment moved on to Přeštice. The regiment’s 1st Battalion entered Horšice, the 2nd Battalion Měčín and the 3rd Battalion Vodokrty. The Indianhead Division’s 23rd Infantry Regiment advanced forward about 15 miles. The regiment’s 2nd Battalion occupied Prostiboř, Kladruby, Horní Sekyřany, Nýřany, and Úherce, while the 3rd Battalion entered Krakov, Hradišťany, Hradec u Stoda, Chotěšov, and Líně. The regiment command was set up in Chotěšov. The 2nd Division's 38th Infantry Regiment advanced to the vicinity of Dobřany and to Dnešice, where it met up with a 16th Armored Division unit. Companies from the regiment’s 1st and 2nd Battalions halted in Dolní Lukavice, and the 3rd Battalion stopped in Stod. Regiment command was set up in Dobřany for now, where a sizable German garrison surrendered to the Americans. Tank columns from the 4th Armored Division’s Combat Commands “A” and “B” started to attack in two military columns to the northeast at 0600 hrs, going through the positions of the 5th and 90th Infantry Divisions. The rugged mountain paths prevented them from advancing more rapidly. Combat Command “B” advanced through Zwiesel, Dobrá Voda, Hartmanice, Sušice, Rabí, and Horažďovice, occupying Velký Bor u Horažďovic at 1500 hrs. The Combat Command “A” headed towards Grafenau, Freyung, Strážný, Horní Vltavice, Vimperk, Volyně, and Strakonice. At the same time it sent a task force composed of the 25th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron and Company C from the 35th Tank Battalion out to Písek. The 2nd Cavalry Group (Mechanized) mopped up Plánice in the district of Klatovy, and then headed for Žinkovy, a village south of Pilsen. The 1st Battalion from the 90th Infantry Division’s 358th Infantry Regiment advanced to Kašperské Hory, Bavorov and Jelenov (Hirschestein), while its sister 2nd Battalion secured the bridges over the Otava River and occupied Rejštejn and The 3rd Battalion mopped up the area around the Křemelná River. The 1st Battalion from the division’s 357th Infantry Regiment advanced through Radostice and Pich, where it liberated about 400 British POWs before moving on to Mokrosuky and Lešišov. Meanwhile, the 2nd Battalion went forward through Petrovice, occupying Žikov a Volšovy, and the 3rd Battalion took up positions in Těšov and Javoří. The 359th Infantry Regiment’s 3rd Battalion advanced along the route from Rittsteig to Svatá Kateřina, Nýrsko, Dešenice, Strážov, Čachrov, and Viteň throughout the day. The 1st Battalion from the 5th Infantry Division’s 11th Infantry Regiment occupied the area around Knížecí Pláně, while the division’s 10th Regiment headed for Kubova Huť. The 26th Infantry Division advanced to the southeast from Volary to the Vltava (Moldau) River. The XX Corps’ 65th Division, currently without the 260th Infantry Regiment which was designated as a police unit in Linz, Austria, was deployed along the Enns River. The 71st Infantry Division’s 66th Infantry Regiment advanced south of Steyr to the Enns River. The division’s 5th Infantry Regiment headed northwards to the dam near Ernsthofen and to the hills on the east bank of the river. The 3rd Cavalry Group (Mechanized) took up new positions near Gmunden on the Traunsee and in Kammer am Attersee.

7 May
The German High Command of the Armed Forces issued a declaration that all of its land, air and naval forces were surrendering. The instrument of surrender was signed at 0241 hrs at the Allied Forces Command in Reims, France. The surrender would go into effect on May 9 at 0001 hrs. The German Wehrmacht’s Chief of Operations Staff Col General Alfred Jodl signed the instrument on behalf of the Germans, US Chief of Staff Lt General Walter Bedell Smith signed on behalf of SHAEF, General Ivan Susloparov signed for the Soviet command, and French Brigadier General François Sevez signed as the official witness.



The units of the 1st Infantry Division and Combat Command "A" from 9th Armored Division remained in their existing positions. Units from the 97th Infantry Division under the US Third Army’s V Corps occupied Bezvěrov and Všeruby. The division’s command post was moved to Konstantinovy Lázně that day. The commander of the German 13th Corps, Lt General Karl Weseberger, and his staff surrendered to Col William D. Long, the commander of the 97th Infantry Division’s 387th Infantry Regiment. The 16th Armored Division’s Combat Command “A” commanded by Lt Col Shelby F. Williams secured the division's left flank to the south and southeast. At 1000 hrs, the Combat Command “B” was placed on full battle alert for a possible advance on Prague. At the same time, Combat Command “B” sent reconnaissance patrols out towards Příbram. Lt Col Thoss B. Beck's Combat Command “R” remained in its current positions to the southeast of Pilsen for now, blocking access routes between Ejpovice and Starý Plzenec against the flood of prisoners of war and refugees heading towards the American lines from Prague. The command of the 23rd Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron was relocated to the Pilsen’s Doubravka district. The squadron received orders to set aside five M8 Greyhound armored cars, three Jeeps and an ambulance, and the convoy was to report at Pilsen-Bory airfield at 1530 hrs. Lt Col Robert Pratt from the V Corps command was expecting the group at the airfield, and briefed those present on the details of their mission: to escort German Col Meyer-Detring, the Chief of Planning at the German High Command of the Armed Forces, to Prague. Because Meyer was a representative of Admiral Dönitz, his task was to negotiate a halt to military operations. The unit then rode off in the direction of Prague, arriving at around midnight. The 2nd Infantry Division’s 9th Infantry Regiment started to advance towards Starý Plzenec, where the regiment had set up its command post. The regiment’s 1st Battalion was deployed in Šťáhlavy, the 2nd Battalion in Chválenice, and the 3rd Battalion in Tymákov. The Indianhead Division’s 23rd Infantry Regiment started to advance on Pilsen, Vejprnice, and Křimice that morning. The 2nd Division’s 38th Infantry Regiment moved to the southeastern section of Pilsen and set up its command post at the management offices of the Měštanský pivovar brewery. The regiment’s 1st and 3rd Battalions remained in Pilsen, and the 2nd Battalion in Hradiště. The 2nd Battalion from the 90th Infantry Division’s 358th Infantry Regiment under the XII Corps advanced to Nezamyslice, Žichovice, Bílenice, and Čimice. In the course of the day, the regiment command moved to Kašperské Hory. Meanwhile, the 357th Infantry Regiment’s 1st Battalion occupied Zavlekov, Tužice, and Stříbrné Hory, the 2nd Battalion took Hradešice, Hliněný Újezd, and Vlkonice, and the 3rd Battalion secured the area around Čejkov and Miřetice. The division’s 359th Infantry Regiment reached the main road between Klatovy and Horažďovice, and received orders to halt its advance. The 3rd Battalion from the 5th Infantry Division’s 11th Infantry Regiment moved to Strážný. The 4th Armored Division was to hold its present positions, build up its defense and refrain from advancing any further.

8 May
This day was declared a day of victory in Europe - V-E Day


Sector in the V corps, reconnaissance patrols of the 97 Infantry Division encountered near Žlutice with Red Army troops.

The command of the 16th Armored Division’s Combat Command “R” moved to Koterov on the outskirts of Pilsen. The 23rd Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron set up its command post in Třemošná. The unit from 23rd Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron that arrived in Prague the night before found that the person to whom the negotiators were supposed to deliver the report had already left town. As a result, the unit immediately set out on another journey and at 0600 hrs reached Velichovky, a small town north of Hradec Králové. After quickly wrapping up negotiations, the unit headed back at 1100 hrs, arriving in Pilsen seven hours later. The 2nd Infantry Division’s 9th Infantry Regiment prepared to move its command post to Rokycany, while the 38th Infantry Regiment remained in its positions in Pilsen. The 23rd Infantry Regiment was located in the vicinity of Křimice and Vejprnice for now. The XII Corps made contact with Red Army units. In Amstetten, Company A from the 11th Armored Division’s 41st Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron met up with a Red Army patrol. The 65th Infantry Division did likewise near Strengberg, as did the 71st Infantry Division near St Peter.

Meanwhile, the 90th Infantry Division’s 359th Infantry Regiment mopped up the woods around Plánice and Zavlekov.
The V Corps positions at midnight, May 7-8, 1945
The 1st Infantry Division – The 26th Infantry Regiment had taken up positions around Luby, Kumštát, and Kraslice; the 18th Infantry Regiment was located in Dolní Žandov, Prameny, and Mnichov; and the 16th Infantry Regiment was in Františkovy Lázně, Hrádek u Habartova, Chlum Svaté Máří, and Arnoltov.

The 97th Infantry Division had sent reconnaissance patrols out to Nečtiny, Manětín, Hvozd and towards Dražeň north of Pilsen, making contact with Red Army units near Žlutice in the district of Carlsbad (Karlovy Vary). The command of the 303rd Infantry Regiment was in Chodová Planá, while the 386th Infantry Regiment was in Město Touškov and the 387th Infantry Regiment in Něšov.

The units from the 2nd Infantry and 16 Armored Divisions were in positions from the previous day



The XII Corps positions at midnight, May 7-8, 1945
The 2nd Cavalry Group (Mechanized) was located east of Klatovy, in the direction of Plánice via Újezd.

The 90th Infantry Division – The 359th Infantry Regiment occupied positions along the main road leading to the southeast out of Klatovy. The regiment’s 1st Battalion was deployed between Mochtín and Bystrá, the 2nd Battalion was located in the area from Čiháň to Plánička, and the 3rd Battalion occupied the rear, between Kněžice and Běšiny. 357th Infantry Regiment – 1st Battalion had moved from Zavlekov to Stříbrné Horz, and the 2nd Battalion from Hradiště to the southeast, towards Rabí in the district of Sušice. 358th Infantry Division – 2nd Battalion held the sector from the Otava River southwards towards Rabí, up to Nezamyslice and Bílenice, while the 3rd Battalion was located in the Žihobce – Soběšice – Víska area.

The 4th Armored Division – Combat Command “B” was located on the Kasejovice – Lnáře – Kadov line. Combat Command “A” took up positions between Katovice and Strakonice, and the 25th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron held the zone between Drakonice and Dub.

The 5th Infantry Division – the 10th Infantry Regiment’s 2nd and 3rd Battalions were in Vimperk, and the 1st Battalion was near Skláře. The 2nd Infantry Regiment’s 2nd Battalion was in Milesice, and the 3rd Battalion in Volary. The 11th Infantry Regiment’s 1st Battalion was located in Knížecí Pláně, and the 2nd Battalion was in the Horní Světlé Hory area.

The 26th Infantry Division – The 101st Infantry Regiment’s 1st Battalion was located between Hůrka, Černá v Pošumaví, and Muckov, and the 3rd Battalion was located in the area from Želnava to Maňava. The 104th Infantry Regiment’s 3rd Battalion took up positions in Bohdalovice, while the 1st Battalion was deployed near Ostrov, south of Malšín and at Machnatec. The 328th Infantry Regiment’s 3rd Battalion was located on the Nahořany – Velenecký vrch line, and the 2nd Battalion was in Horní Dvořiště.
END


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