The wine and jazz appreciation society news, vol 5, no 1, 1/2/99



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Availability. Available from selected retailers for approximately $40 per bottle (9/11 Group, Larters Cellars, Sisco's on the Pier and Syrup in Tasmania; Caffe Grossi, Devino Cellars and Terminus Hotel in Melbourne; John Coppins, La Vigna and Tamword in Perth; Ascot Cellars, Smithfield Tavern, The Gap Tavern and River Canteen in Brisbane) or contact the winery, telephone (03) 6263 7457, fax (03) 6263 7430, email lubiana@bigpond.com
Sterling Heights Chardonnay 1997. (9/11 St Ives Trophy for Best Chardonnay). Best drinking:1999–2003

Drink with: Sweetbreads

Background. The wine is made in tiny quantities by the enormously talented Alain Rousseau of Moorilla Estate. It is barrel-fermented, but, interestingly, is not taken through malolactic fermentation, which is no doubt part of the reason why the wine has such intense fruit flavour. The 1997 vintage won the trophy for Best Chardonnay at the 1999 Tasmanian Wines Show. Unusually for Tasmania, the vineyard is established on relatively poor sandy soils, similar to those of Elsewhere Vineyard.

Tasting note. Medium yellow-green; the complexity and power of the wine are immediately evident on the bouquet, with tangy stone fruit and citrus aromas supported by subtle barrel ferment oak. The palate is likewise rich, complex and concentrated, with ripe stone fruit flavours and subtle oak playing a pure support role.



Availablity. Tiny quantities of the wine were still available for sale at the time of the Wine Show, telephone/fax Geoff Wells on (03) 6396 3214. $185 per case plus freight.
Wellington Riesling 1996. (TNT Express/Kwikasair Trophy for Best Aromatic White, The Examiner Trophy and Chairman of Judges Selection). Rating: 94. Best drinking: 1999–2004. Drink with: Sautéed prawns

Background. Another wine from the Wellington stable to repay cellaring, and, as with the other wines, immaculately made. Sourced not from southern Tasmania, but from a vineyard at Relbia, on the outskirts of Launceston. The 1996 was held back in the cellar for further aging and released after the 97, a strategy which resulted not only in a gold medal but three trophies at the 1999 Tasmanian Wines Show.

Tasting note. Bright green-yellow; the influence of botrytis is evident on both the bouquet and palate, but is very much to the advantage of the wine, rather than to its disadvantage. The high-toned fruit aromas of the bouquet are followed by a remarkably intense palate, with sweet lime juice flavours rippling through from the very start to the very finish.

Availability. Available by mail order from Wellington Wines, Cnr Richmond and Denholms Roads, Cambridge, Tas 7170, telephone (03) 6248 5844, fax (03) 6243 0226. $210 per case plus freight.
East Arm Vineyard Riesling 1998. (Top gold medal 1998 Riesling Class). Rating: 94. Best drinking: 2000–2008

Drink with: Scallops

Background. Produced from a small estate planting of around two-thirds of a hectare of riesling established in 1993. Tiny amounts of wine were made in 1996 and 1997, with the first commercial vintage coming in 1998. Voted the Best Tasmanian Riesling of 1998 at the Tasmanian Wine Centre in November 1998, and on its second showing, was the top gold medal in the very strong 1998 Riesling class at the 1999 Tasmanian Wines Show.

Tasting note. Pale straw-green; the wine has a piercing bouquet with aromas of lemon, lime, stone fruit and some quite spicy lift. The palate is uncompromising, with the flavours of the bouquet supported and reinforced by lingering, potent acidity. A wine which begs to be cellared.



Availability. Available from cellar door at Dalyrmple Vineyards (Dalrymple winemaker Burt or Bert Sundstrup was the maker, telephone (03) 6331 3179, fax (03) 6331 3179), or by mail order (James Wettenall Wines, PO Box 1932, Launceston, Tas 7250. It is also available from David Johnstone, Wine Merchant, 201 Collins St, Hobart at around $16.
Freycinet Cabernet Sauvignon 1994. (Abel labels Trophy for Best Cabernet Sauvignon). Rating: 94. Best drinking: 1999–2010

Drink with: Double-thick lamb loin chops

Background. Estate-grown, and a testament to the exceptional qualities of the amphitheatre-shaped Freycinet vineyard which is a sun and heat trap, well protected from the least desirable winds.

Tasting note. Full red-purple; a very complex bouquet with hints of mint, which quickly move into rich dark chocolate and blackberry flavours on the palate. The wine has excellent texture, and ripe tannins.



Availability. Available from cellar door or mail order at $28 per bottle, telephone (03) 6257 8384, fax (03) 6257 8454, Tasman Highway via Bicheno (PO Box 35, Bicheno), Tas 7215.

THE WINE AND JAZZ APPRECIATION SOCIETY NEWS, VOL 5, NO 24, 16 /7/99

Happiness is an imaginary condition, formerly often attributed by the living to the dead, now usually attributed by adults to children, and by children to adults. Thomas Szasz, The Second Sin, 1974.
A week in Fremantle was most acceptable even though it was a jazz-free zone - (mostly) fine weather, lots of socialising, the Fremantle Market and, oh yes, conference participation. The imaginatively titled Irish pub, The Bog, was irresistible - its Irish Jarrah floors, walls, bars and furniture, Irish R & B music like Jimmy O’Barnes, Irish fake leadlighting stuck on the windows - a fair amount of time was spent there soaking up the atmosphere and victuals. A fine conference dinner was negotiated at the Freo Sailing Club - very luxurious - the opulence is palpable. Hundreds of seacraft moored outside - a thousand masts proclaim their owners’ status (Does that mean that each craft has several masts? Ed.).
However, abstinence makes the heart grow fonder - I think that’s how it goes; so a return to Bennetts Lane was anticipated with some relish. The David Rex Quartet comprises David Rex (alto), Danny Fisher (drums), Matt Clohessy (bass), and Mark Fitzgibbon (piano). Matt had missed the last two performances of the Quartet - holidaying at Port Douglas (who said musos are underpaid?). The consequence was painfully sore fingers on his return, the requisite callouses having softened over that period. It wasn’t evident in his playing which was melodious and suitably rhythmical. Danny was in fine fettle on kettle (and other hitty things) - his playing is visually appealing (or distracting, depending on your perspective), and he is never content to simply keep time, by following the leader. He is often provocative - drawing soloists out; though, he claims to be endeavouring to take more of a back seat role these days. Whatever, I love to watch him play.
Mark of the famous Fitzgibbon family was clearly born to the piano. His playing on the frequent up-tempo be-bop numbers is unerringly fast yet seemingly unhurried - surely the hallmark of a superior player. His playing is usually very dense - few pauses in the music - and he rarely stops playing; even during most solos he plays a strongly supportive role. One can often hear little blues phrases or South American riffs in his solos that are intriguing - little snippets that disappear before you are sure that you’ve heard them. David on alto is of the how-many-notes-can-you-play-in-one-minute school. I enjoy his musical travels up and down the scales, though it’s not everyone’s cup of meat. The first set comprised: Yes or No, Like Same?, You Stepped Out of a Dream, Sophisicated Lady, Patience Please (Rex original).
After an extended break (How come musicians can keep time during their numbers, but not between their sets?) the second set was equally seamless, with the playlist including Swinging at the Haven, Paul, Adult Orientation (Rex), Falls, Illusions in Blue, and Move (on which a fine brushes and sticks solo from Danny impressed).

New South Wales Wine Awards

A shiraz from Mudgee was the major winner at the 1998 Sydney Morning Herald/Hotel Inter Continental NSW Wine Awards, which were announced recently in the Hotel Inter Continental's James Cook Ballroom by the New South Wales Minister for Agriculture, Mr Richard Amery.


The 1994 Huntington Estate Special Reserve Shiraz was selected by the judging panel, first as the Best Mature Dry Red and then as the overall winner in the competition, which is a showcase for the wines of New South Wales.
The full list of winning wines is:

Hotel Inter Continental Sydney Wine of the Year

1994 Huntington Estate Special Reserve Shiraz Bin FB26


Best NSW Sparkling Wine

1997 Briar Ridge Cuvée Pinot Noir Chardonnay



Sponsored by: Wine Press Club of NSW
Best NSW Young Dry White

1997 Tyrrell's Moon Mountain Chardonnay



Sponsored by: Restaurant and Catering New South Wales
Best NSW Mature Dry White

1992 Reynolds Yarraman Semillon



Sponsored by: A&G Engineering Pty Ltd
Best NSW Young Dry Red

1996 Barwang Cabernet Sauvignon



Sponsored by: Liquor Stores Association of NSW
Best NSW Mature Dry Red

1994 Huntington Estate Special Reserve Shiraz Bin FB26



Sponsored by: The Wine Magazine
Best NSW Sweet Wine

1997 Carramar Estate Botrytis Semillon



Sponsored by: Australian Sommeliers Association NSW Inc.
The chairman of judges, Huon Hooke, said that in the three years the competition had been going, he had never seen such excitement amongst the judges during the trophy judging. "We had a very strong group of wines coming through to the second round of judging, and the winners reflect an undoubted renaissance in New South Wales.
"There are many new areas being explored and starting to produce exciting new styles to complement the traditional regions, which themselves are coming up with new players, new ideas, renewed vigour and improved quality. A good variety of New South Wales regions were represented in the top awards, and although the number of entries was similar to last year, the standard was the highest so far."
Hooke's team of judges comprised Martin Shaw (Adelaide Hills winemaker), Tim White (winewriter, Financial Review), Peter Bourne (wine educator), Andrew Caillard (wine auctioneer) and Peter Scudamore-Smith MW (winewriter and winemaking consultant), who led panels including sommeliers, bottleshop staff, winemakers, wine sales representatives and wholesalers.

THE WINE AND JAZZ APPRECIATION SOCIETY NEWS, VOL 5, NO 25, 26 /7/99

Work is the curse of the drinking classes. Oscar Wilde.
A newcomer to the music scene is Mayfields (103 Smith St), almost opposite the Grace Darling Hotel. Formerly Budinskis, a theatre/music haunt for a number of years, it is a rather large cavernous rectangular space with a central bar serving bottled wine and beers (Guinness cans $5, no pint glasses tch, tch; some interesting and well-priced wines, Blue Pyrenees, Bethany cabernet, Stoniers cabernet $6/glass). High baltic pine ceiling, concrete floor, candlelit tables in an otherwise pretty dark place - it feels rather warehousy when empty of people. One long wall is brick and its opposite is curtained and has a full length bench along that wall. There are a dozen or so tables and a few old theatre seats, with plenty of room for dancing. Staff are friendly and helpful.
It’s a pretty cold space with no heating, and I’m distinctly under-dressed for the early stages of a rare and undeserved infection, one that is possibly life threatening but probably a cold. Treating it with Orthoxical, half a kilo of Vit C, enough zinc to protect a medium sized yacht from electrolytic decay, numerous Guinness and a few cigs (to let the infection know it’s not dealing with a sook). While I’m soaking up the atmosphere and other substances, the roadies are dressing up the large stage with candelabra, and the mike stands, inexplicably, with a sort of alfoil. Bizarre, perhaps but undoubtedly part of the image of unorthodoxy Dianna Kiss wish to project.
Food is available, the extent of the menu dependent upon what the chef can resurrect from the fridge. He was out buying a lettuce when I was ready to order - so I presume that in these early days of the place they do not anticipate a great rush on the menu. Nevertheless, minestrone with bruschetta was delicious, and cheap ($5) - home-made with fresh produce, crunchy vegetables and plenty of medicinal garlic, chilli and ginger.
A group difficult to categorise - elements of ska, reggae, blues, jazz can be recognised in their diverse offerings, a mix I have enjoyed on previous occasions. Ross Hannaford (once of Daddy Cool) is also well known as a solo singer/guitarist, and leader of a trio playing mainly blues-based music. His idiosyncratic style is defined by an impossibly deep bass voice, scrambled diction suggestive of significant brain damage, a tall, angular and spidery frame that insinuates itself in fits and starts rather than moving fluently, and a unique, quirky guitar technique. Armed with a green BIC lighter as a slide for his Chandler guitar (is the colour important or will any BIC do the job?), he fronts the band. Jex Saarelaht is well known in jazz circles as a pianist, though with this group he plays Hammond organ, on top of which is a Rhodes electric piano keyboard and a Melodica (a little keyboard powered by air blown by mouth through an attached tube), an instrument that sounds a little like a harmonica. Russell Smith provides the occasional vocal, amusing himself in between on Hohner Clavinet (a keyboard), valve trombone, and trumpet. Versatile and talented is our Russell - also known as a former Vince Jones band-member, and later of the Hidden Charms, a fine local jazz/blues group of which little recently, but whose CD “Use Your Head” was favourably received by those who know.
Concerning drummer, Peter Jones, I’m ignorant and remain so after the gig as his playing was solo-free and understated, tending to be outweighed by the serious talents of Ray Pereira, master percussionist and a player much in demand around the country. Replacing Stuart Speed (on tour with “Men At Work”) was Steven Hadley, a pretty impressive pickup.
Few people in attendance for the start of their first set, but the crowd swelled as the evening progressed - a friendly if talkative mob, quite a few doing some free-form grooving to the rhythmically irresistible sounds of Diana Kiss. Rhythm reigns in this group’s offerings - there are few real solos - one instrumental element may briefly hold ascendancy, but the others do not stop playing. This makes for interesting layers in the music - but the usual frontline instruments appear subservient to the very strong rhythm section. The overall effect is laid back and mildly hypnotic - very enjoyable and uplifting for me, but not upbeat enough for the transpersonal and psychodynamic psychotherapist, who wanted to discuss with me the reasons for my note-taking and later, to debate the merits of his approach to psychotherapy. A good new venue, and about to open more frequently with artists such as Uncle Bill, and Kerry Simpson on Wednesdays and Thursdays. I was apprehensive about the likely sound qualities of the room given the predominance of hard surfaces. However, the curtained walls and high ceilings appear to be sufficient to create a sympathetic aural setting, and the sound was certainly clear and crisp.
The 1998 Royal Adelaide Wine Show Trophy Winners

The following are the results of the 1998 Royal Adelaide Wine Show of which I am chairman of judges. I have given a brief tasting note for each of the trophy winners. James Halliday


THE WINE SOCIETY TROPHY for BEST SPARKLING WINE

1995 Seaview Pinot Chardonnay

Full flavoured, rich and complex with a depth of sweet fruit which enhances its appeal to experts and consumers alike. Fully mature and at its peak.
THE SCHAHINGER TROPHY for BEST VARIETAL CHARDONNAY

1997 Lindemans Padthaway Chardonnay

A stylish wine showing the skilful use of the whole gamut of winemaking techniques; great balance and length to a creamy textured palate.
THE COLLOTYPE LABELS for BEST VARIETAL RIESLING

Trentham Estate 1998 Riesling

Bright, fresh, crisp and faintly spicy aromas are attractive, but it is the length of the wine on the palate which made it top its class.
THE CHESSER CELLARS TROPHY for BEST VARIETAL WHITE TABLE WINE, SAUVIGNON BLANC

No award
VINTAGE CELLARS TROPHY for BEST VARIETAL SEMILLON

Tyrell's 1990 Vat 1 Semillon

A glorious Semillon at the peak of perfection, yet will hold for many more years. Perfect balance, spotlessly clean and amazingly long finish.


AON RISK SERVICES AUSTRALIA TROPHY for BEST VARIETAL WHITE TABLE WINE, ANY VARIETY

Trentham Estate 1998 Riesling

Tasting note as above.
THE WINE RESOURCES TROPHY for BEST DRY WHITE TABLE WINE

Leo Buring 1984 Maturation Reserve Riesling

A classic 15 year old Riesling which has added to an already extraordinary show record; a magical combination of toast, honey and lime. A privilege to taste, and even more to drink.
THE JB MACMAHON TROPHY for BEST FULL-BODIED DRY WHITE TABLE WINE

Penfolds 1995 Reserve Adelaide Hills Chardonnay

A marvellous wine with a complex aroma and structure, exhibiting the highly skilled and sensitive use of oak seamlessly wedded to tangy melon and nectarine fruit which rolls along the tongue to a long finish. Topped an exceptionally strong class of great wines.
THE LIQUORLAND TROPHY for BEST MEDIUM-DRY WHITE TABLE WINE

No award
ZURICH INTERNATIONAL TROPHY for BEST SWEET WHITE TABLE WINE

Miranda 1995 Golden Botrytis

Another exceptional wine with an impressive show record, lusciously sweet with mandarin, cumquat and honey balanced by lingering acidity on the finish.


CHAIRMAN OF JUDGES TROPHY for BEST BOTRYTISED SWEET TABLE WINE

Miranda 1997 Botrytis Semillon

Golden nectar, with layers of honeycomb, honey and apricot. Great length and intensity marred neither by volatility nor excessive oak.
THE MELBOURNE STREET FINE WINE CELLARS TROPHY for BEST VARIETAL DRY RED TABLE WINE, MERLOT

Fox Creek Wine 1997 Merlot

Abundant sweet fruit on both bouquet and palate, at once sweet and savoury, with dark foresty berries; balanced tannins and oak.
THE INDUSTRIAL REFRIGERATION SERVICES TROPHY for BEST VARIETAL DRY RED TABLE WINE, PINOT NOIR

No award
THE CORK AND SEALS TROPHY for BEST VARIETAL DRY RED TABLE WINE, SHIRAZ

Lake Breeze Wines 1996 Winemakers Selection Shiraz

Rich and complex with hints of spice, liquorice earth and leather supported by well balanced tannins. A big wine but not muscle-bound, and a wholly admirable expression of the variety.


THE WINE INDUSTRY JOURNAL TROPHY for BEST VARIETAL DRY RED TABLE WINE, ANY VARIETY

Lake Breeze Wines 1996 Winemakers Selection Shiraz

Tasting note as above.
THE TONNELLERIE RADOUX TROPHY for BEST DRY RED, FRESH YOUNG TABLE WINE

McWilliam's Wines 1998 Sunstone Red

Fresh, lively and tangy fruit, with almost no tannins and subtle oak. A wine to be drunk with joy, not introspection.
THE W.E. WARE TROPHY for BEST DRY RED, MEDIUM-BODIED TABLE WINE

Tyrrell's 1997 Reserve Brokenback Shiraz

A supremely elegant medium-bodied shiraz with cherry and spice fruit supported by subtle oak.
THE MONTGOMERY TROPHY for BEST DRY RED, FULL BODIED TABLE WINE

Saltram 1996 No 1 Shiraz

A wine combining power with elegance; deft oak handling adds a hint of spice to lovely blackcurrant fruit.
THE PRECISION LABELS TROPHY for BEST TAWNY PORT

Morris Wines Show Tawny Port

A wine fuller in body than the more usual style, with excellent rancio complexity, and no hint of staleness.
THE PROGRAMMED MAINTENANCE SERVICES TROPHY for BEST VINTAGE PORT

1993 Stanton & Killeen Wines

An exceptionally interesting wine with overtones of Portuguese vintage port, already developing grace and complexity.
THE JOHN FORNACHON MEMORIAL TROPHY for BEST DRY SHERRY

B Seppelt & Sons Fino Dp117

A classic fino with beautiful flor character and sustained flavour.
VISY BOARD TROPHY for BEST SWEET WHITE DESSERT, INCLUDING MUSCAT TYPE

Morris Wines Show Muscat

The deep mahogany colour and slow swirl in the glass is matched by intensely luscious, complex raisin and plum pudding flavours. A powerful classic.
THE AUSTRALIAN WINE AND BRANDY CORPORATION TROPHY for BEST TABLE WINE IN CONSUMER CLASSES, LESS THAN $15

Heathcote 1997 Seventh Horse Padthaway/Bendigo Shiraz

Attractive spicy fruit and oak influences; at the light end of the full-bodied class, but very well crafted and balanced.
THE MILLER & CO TROPHY for BEST WHITE TABLE WINE IN THE SHOW

Penfolds 1995 Reserve Adelaide Hills Chardonnay

Tasting note as above.
THE WINE PRESS CLUB TROPHY for BEST DRY RED TABLE WINE IN THE SHOW

Lake Breeze Wines 1996 Winemakers Selection Shiraz

Tasting note as above.
THE ADELAIDE TROPHY for MOST OUTSTANDING RED OR WHITE TABLE WINE IN THE SHOW

Penfolds 1995 Reserve Adelaide Hills Chardonnay

Tasting note as above.
THE SINGAPORE AIRLINES PRIZE for THE WINE MAKER OF THE MOST OUTSTANDING RED OR WHITE TABLE WINE IN THE SHOW

won by Neville Falkenberg

Tasting note as above.
THE MAX SCHUBERT TROPHY for BEST CONSUMER TABLE WINE IN THE SHOW

Hardy Wine Co 1995 Eileen Hardy Shiraz



A massively rich and concentrated wine with lots of American oak, big, black fruit and cherry flavours and matching tannins. Truly formidable. Surely Max Schubert would doff his hat to a wine such as this.

THE WINE AND JAZZ APPRECIATION SOCIETY NEWS, VOL 5, NO 26, 30 /7/99

"It's the earthy, gamey, feral, sweaty saddle -- call it what you will -- taste of the reds I like. I've heard told that if you marinate some steak overnight in one of Tamburlaine's big reds, the next morning the steak's gone, and the wine's purring!" A Hunter lover.
Manchester Lane, Thursday evening after terrific congee with prawns and scallops at The Oriental (Cnr Little Bourke and Lonsdale). About 35 people at ML when I arrived, including several groups of somewhat noisy diners. Very hard to hear from up the back on the uppermost deck, so it’s across to the bar stools area that overlooks the band. The drums are nearest to this possy and the piano furthest, so it’s not a great place to listen either - the piano being overpowered by the drums at times. The glass doors behind the band have been shrouded with noise absorbing materials, thus reducing the room’s former overly bright sound character, but also apparently diminishing the piano’s sonic penetration into the listening areas i.e., piano too soft. Perhaps the piano and drums should swap places.
Moody’s Brood is a group I’ve not before seen - young, VCA trained, and led by bassist Belinda Moody - it boasts Monique DiMattina (piano), Peter Knight (trumpet), Alisha Brooks (alto), Jamie Jones (drums). Absent because the place doesn’t pay well enough was tenor player, Christophe Genoux. An odd sight to see a bassist sitting down to play, but it is the only way Belinda’s dodgy back will allow her to complete the evening’s duties vis a vis plucking. I’d have thought her final feat of carrying out the bass under one arm and amplifier/speaker under the other was more stressful on the back, but I’m not a musician. Three sets, the first with a couple of Horace Silver tunes (Song for my Father, Senor Blues), also Herbie Hancock’s Driftin’, the traditional, Fiddler on the Roof, and an original, Groove Merchant. The remaining sets comprised a few Adderley tunes - Nat’s Jive Samba and Nippon Soul, and Cannonball’s Sticks, Ellington’s Angelica, and a couple of tunes (Country Preacher, Walk Tall) by a J. Zawinul (I think).
The diners had decamped by 10.30 so the room was much more agreeable, though by this time the band population exceeded that of the listeners. The remnants nevertheless applauded vigorously to reduce the chances of the band packing up early in a huff. A tasty cab-merlot from Plunketts was something of a match for the music - it was smooth without being challenging. The band’s tunes tend to be shortish, with solos sometimes finishing just as I began to find them interesting. I found this policy a little disappointing, and though it precludes self-indulgent solo marathons, it also leaves one wondering (however unfairly) whether the artists are either unable or not confident enough to explore the tunes more profoundly. There was an element of predictability that was furthered by the tendency to begin the tunes in ensemble fashion and to provide the reprise in the same manner. On the other hand there was some attractive horn comping behind the solos at times, and a delicious (if abbreviated) Monique solo in Fiddler (I think) in which her playing behind-the-beat was a moment to treasure. So, a band I’d like to hear again - perhaps when Christophe is allowed to play - adding some grunt with his sometimes searing tenor. Moody’s Brood has a CD launch at Chapel Off Chapel, Mon 30/8.
On Thursday, August 19, the Exhibition of Victorian Winemakers will again provide a showcase of some of Australia’s best wines in a congenial environment. A great night - 5.30pm-9pm, the opportunity to participate in a tutored tasting of Rutherglen reds, including some old Durifs. Then onwards to music in one of Melbourne’s fine jazz establishments.
As the Melbourne Wine Show judging nears, it may be of interest to see on what basis they pronounce one wine more worthy than another. And also to refresh our memories of the winners of 98.
The Australian show wine judging system (also referred to as the Roseworthy Scoring System).

1) APPEARANCE: Maximum 3 points

a) COLOUR 2 points: Meets specifications 2 points; Some incorrect tints 1 point; Fails specifications 0 points.

b) CLARITY 1 point: Brilliant 1 point; clear 0.5 point; dull 0 points,


2) NOSE: Maximum 7 points

a) INTENSITY 4 points: Grape aroma/oak/bottle complexity 2 to 4 points; Vinous 1 to 1.5 points; Neutral 0 to 0.5 points

b) FAULTS 3 points: None 3 points; Detectable 1 to 2.5 points; Serious 0 to 0.5 points
3) PALATE: Maximum 10 points

a) INTENSITY 3 points: Full flavour/persistence 2 to 3 points; Medium 1 to 1.5 points; Neutral or thin 0 to 0.5 points

b) ACID BALANCE 2 points: Deduct for insufficient/excess acid 0 to 2 points

c) FAULTS 3 points: None 3 points; Detectable 1 to 2.5 points; Serious 0 to 0.5 points


4) OVERALL quality and balance 2 points:
Total 20 points
18.5 to 20 points - gold medal

17 to 18.4 points - silver medal.

15.5 points and 16.9 points - bronze medal.

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