The Plains Indians Curriculum Unit Christina Bell Ed 420 Professor Stambler 5/17/10 Table of Contents



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CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Sentences & Paragraphs

Sentences and paragraphs are complete, well-constructed and of varied structure.

All sentences are complete and well-constructed (no fragments, no run-ons). Paragraphing is generally done well.

Most sentences are complete and well-constructed. Paragraphing needs some work.

Many sentence fragments or run-on sentences OR paragraphing needs lots of work.

Salutation and Closing

Salutation and closing have no errors in capitalization and punctuation.

Salutation and closing have 1-2 errors in capitalization and punctuation.

Salutation and closing have 3 or more errors in capitalization and punctuation.

Salutation and/or closing are missing.

Ideas

Ideas were expressed in a clear and organized fashion. It was easy to figure out what the letter was about.

Ideas were expressed in a pretty clear manner, but the organization could have been better.

Ideas were somewhat organized, but were not very clear. It took more than one reading to figure out what the letter was about.

The letter seemed to be a collection of unrelated sentences. It was very difficult to figure out what the letter was about.

Neatness

Letter is typed, clean, not wrinkled, and is easy to read with no distracting error corrections. It was done with pride.

Letter is neatly hand-written, clean, not wrinkled, and is easy to read with no distracting error corrections. It was done with care.

Letter is typed and is crumpled or slightly stained. It may have 1-2 distracting error corrections. It was done with some care.

Letter is typed and looks like it had been shoved in a pocket or locker. It may have several distracting error corrections. It looks like it was done in a hurry or stored improperly.

Format

Complies with all the requirements for a friendly letter.

Complies with almost all the requirements for a friendly letter.

Complies with several of the requirements for a friendly letter.

Complies with less than 75% of the requirements for a friendly letter.

Content Accuracy

The letter contains at least 5 accurate facts about the topic.

The letter contains 3-4 accurate facts about the topic.

The letter contains 1-2 accurate facts about the topic.

The letter contains no accurate facts about the topic.

Capitalization and Punctuation

Writer makes no errors in capitalization and punctuation.

Writer makes 1-2 errors in capitalization and punctuation.

Writer makes 3-4 errors in capitalization and punctuation.

Writer makes more than 4 errors in capitalization and punctuation.



buy projects about the plains indians, marian broida, 0761416013

Projects About The Plains Indians

 By:  Marian Broida

 

Teacher: Christina Bell

Grade Level: Grade 4

Topic: Plains Indians- Communication
Content Standard 2: Competence in literacy, inquiry, and research skills is necessary to analyze, evaluate, and present history and social studies information.

2.2 Interpret information from a variety of primary and secondary sources, including electronic media.

2.3 Create various forms of written work to demonstrate an understanding of history and social studies issues.
NCSS Standards: See attached NCSS Matrix
Learner Background: The students know that there is communication going on all around them, such as cell phone use, computer use, and even just talking in general. The students may have an idea of what sign language is, but they don’t know the specifics of sign language in Plains Indian culture. The students don’t know that the Plains Indians did not use verbal language to communicate, but used pictures, signals, and sign language instead.

Student Learning Objectives:

Cognitive: After a class discussion on Plains Indian communication, the student will identify three different forms of communication displayed by the Plains Indians, with 85% accuracy.
Psychomotor: After the teacher models the sign language direction, the student will create their own pictorial sign language and role play with partners with 100% participation.
Affective: After reviewing Plains Indian communication, the student will display interest in Plains Indian communication after answering the closure questions with 100% participation.

Assessment:

The students will mainly be assessed on participation throughout the class. The teacher will monitor group (role playing and class discussions) and independent (pictorial sign language) participation throughout the class to keep each student on task. The teacher’s comprehensive and affective assessment will be the student’s answer to the questions during the closure, at the end of class. The teacher will collect and grade the student question responses, along with the pictorial sign language worksheet.


Materials/Resources:

Pen, pencil, dry-erase marker/chalk, worksheet 1 (pictorial sign language), worksheet 2 (closure questions)Websites: http://nativeamericans.mrdonn.org/plains/pictographs.html , http://www.texasbeyondhistory.net/st-plains/kids/talking/index.html



Learning Activities:
Initiation:

The teacher will start the lesson off asking how people communicate today.

Example: phone calls, texting, emails, talking in general, AIM

The teacher will say the main focus of today’s lesson is Plains Indians communication.


Lesson Development:
Concept 1: The Plains Indians used pictographs to communicate stories of heroes, battles, and daily life.
The teacher will start off the lesson introducing Plains Indian pictograph, signals, and language using the following website: http://nativeamericans.mrdonn.org/plains/pictographs.html
The teacher will display the Plains Indian pictograph painting and ask for student opinions.
The teacher will ask the students (using the painting as an aid):

  1. What is a pictograph?

-form of Plains Indian communication using pictures and symbols

  1. Where do you think pictures are drawn?

- wrote on rocks, cave walls, and on scraps of buffalo hide

  1. What do pictographs communicate?

- These pictographs told stories of their battles, heroes, and daily life.
The teacher will clarify what a pictograph is by reading an article to the class on the website under “Pictures.”

Concept 2: Plains Indians used different signals as indicators of possible danger.
The teacher will introduce a second form of Plains Indian communication which is: signs and signals.
The teacher will have students volunteer to read about smoke signals, fire signals, blanket signals, and mirror signs off the website: http://nativeamericans.mrdonn.org/plains/pictographs.html

Concept 3: Plains Indians used sign language to communicate with each other, other tribes, and Europeans.
The teacher will introduce a third form of Plains communication which is: sign language.

The teacher will ask the students if they have any prior knowledge about sign language. The teacher will read the text under the “sign language” category of the website: http://nativeamericans.mrdonn.org/plains/pictographs.html


The teacher will tell the students that they will be creating their own sign language to communicate just as the Plains Indians did. The teacher displays the following website on the projector to show activity directions: (http://www.texasbeyondhistory.net/st-plains/kids/talking/index.html).

The teacher will model an example on the board.


Concept 4: Creating your own sign language is helpful in understanding Plains Indian communication.
After the students each create their own sign language, they will communicate their pictures to a partner. Each student will act out his/her own sign language with a partner, and it is the partner’s job to guess what his peer is trying to communicate. The student’s will keep switching partners and acting out their drawn picture sign language and guessing other peer’s sign language for about ten minutes.
Closure:

The teacher will review all different forms of Plains Indian communication: Pictographs, Signals and Signs, and Sign Language, through a question/answer based discussion.


The teacher will ask the student’s to pick their favorite Plains Indian form of communication.
The student will answer the following questions on a piece of paper:

  1. Why did you pick this form of Plains Indian communication as your favorite?

  2. How does this particular Plains Indian form of communication relate to communication in the world today?

  3. Did you enjoy this lesson on Plains Indian communication? Why?

The teacher will collect the piece of paper at the end of the class, along with the sign language pictorial worksheet as well.


Which students do you anticipate may struggle with the content/learning objectives of this lesson?

Student name

Evidence that the student needs differentiated instruction

How will you differentiate instruction in this lesson to support student learning?

Bella Swanson



Bella has a hard time working with other peers during role play activities. She becomes very shy and unresponsive.

During the role-play activity, I will have Bella work with me when role playing so she will feel comfortable when acting out her pictorial sign language. She will then guess my sign language pictorial. Bella will be able to sit in her seat as the teacher monitors the rest of the students during the role play activity.

Worksheet 1: http://www.texasbeyondhistory.net/st-plains/kids/talking/index.html

(teacher will print offline for worksheet 1)


Acting and Pictorial Drawing Rubric
Teacher Name: Miss Bell

Student Name:     ________________________________________









CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Quality of Work

Provides work of the highest quality.

Provides high quality work.

Provides work that occasionally needs to be checked/redone by other group members to ensure quality.

Provides work that usually needs to be checked/redone by others to ensure quality.

Focus on the task

Consistently stays focused on the task and what needs to be done. Very self-directed.

Focuses on the task and what needs to be done most of the time. Other group members can count on this person.

Focuses on the task and what needs to be done some of the time. Other group members must sometimes nag, prod, and remind to keep this person on-task.

Rarely focuses on the task and what needs to be done. Lets others do the work.

Working with Others

Almost always listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others. Tries to keep people working well together.

Usually listens to, shares, with, and supports the efforts of others. Does not cause "waves" in the group.

Often listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others, but sometimes is not a good team member.

Rarely listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others. Often is not a good team player.

Attitude

Never is publicly critical of the project or the work of others. Always has a positive attitude about the task(s).

Rarely is publicly critical of the project or the work of others. Often has a positive attitude about the task(s).

Occasionally is publicly critical of the project or the work of other members of the group. Usually has a positive attitude about the task(s).

Often is publicly critical of the project or the work of other members of the group. Often has a negative attitude about the task(s).

Pictoral Drawing (worksheet1)

Drawing shows clear and concise pictures with 5-10 words.

Drawing shows pictures with 5-10 words.

Drawing is unclear but shows 5-8 words.

The drawing is unclear and shows less than 5 words.

Name:____________________

Plain Indian Communication (Worksheet 2)

Directions: Answer the following questions in complete sentences.

  1. Why did you pick this form of Plains Indian communication as your favorite?



  1. How does this particular Plains Indian form of communication relate to communication in the world today?



  1. Did you enjoy this lesson on Plains Indian communication? Why?


Teacher: Christina Bell

Grade Level: Grade 4

Topic: Plains Indians- Sitting Bull: Good Leader or Not?
Content Standard 3: Civic competence in addressing historical issues and current problems requires the use of information, skills, and empathic awareness.
3.2 Analyze and evaluate human action in historical and/or contemporary contexts from alternative points of view.
NCSS Standards: See attached NCSS Matrix
Student Learning Objectives:

Cognitive: After watching a video and participating in a class discussion, the student will decide if Sitting Bull is a good leader or not with 85% accuracy.
Psychomotor: After discussing the criteria needed in an essay assignment, the student will compose a persuasive essay using information in the movie and class discussion, with 85% accuracy
Affective: After essays are completed, the students will connect knowledge of Sitting Bull’s past to the world today, after answering a closure question with 100% participation.

Assessment:

The teacher will have two assessments measuring comprehension. The first assessment is a worksheet the students will fill out as they are watching the movie. The second assessment is the completion of the persuasive essay. The teacher will grade the essay based on the persuasive essay rubric. The affective assessment involves the student connecting Sitting Bull’s qualities as a leader to the world today by answering a question at the end of the class. The teacher will also take note of student participation in group discussions throughout the class.


Materials/Resources: pen, pencil, dry-erase marker/chalk, computer, worksheet 1, lined essay paper, piece of notebook paper, persuasive essay rubric
Learning Activities:
Initiation:

The teacher will ask the class about the definition and characteristics of a leader.


1) What is a leader?

2) What are some characteristics of a good leader? Bad leader?

http://www.genv.net/en-us/dream_it/team_building/what_leader (can use as guide)
Lesson Development:
Concept 1: Sitting Bull is a famous and memorable Plains Indian chief.
The teacher will have the students watch a 10 minute video on Sitting Bull. The students will need to answer ALL questions on Worksheet 1 while watching the following video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IX9MLiOOceQ&feature=related


Concept 2: Sitting Bull displays many qualities and characteristics of a good leader.
Teacher will go over answers to questions and conduct a class discussion that will answer the following question:
Based on the qualities and characteristics of a leader, is Sitting Bull a good leader, or a bad leader?
Teacher will enhance the discussion by reading information about Sitting Bull using the following article:

http://www.mce.k12tn.net/indians/famous/sitting_bull.htm
The following topics will also be touched on:

-Strong Hearts

-chief's headdress

-Sun Dance
Concept 3: Writing a persuasive essay helps to focus student positive and negative thoughts about Sitting Bull’s life as a Plains Indian Chief.
The teacher will have the students write a persuasive essay about Sitting Bull explaining why they think he is a good leader or a bad leader.


  1. The students must first pick a side:

Side 1: Sitting Bull is a good leader because…..

Side 2: Sitting Bull is a bad leader because……




  1. The students must provide three facts from the movie and/or discussion on the board to support their side.



  1. The students must follow appropriate persuasive letter format (see attached rubric)*

*As the students are writing essay, the teacher can play Sitting Bull’s memorial song:

(sitting bull song) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwQFmTwbQpE


Closure:

The teacher will close the lesson by having some of the students present their essays if there is time.


The teacher will have the students take out a piece of notebook paper and answer the following questions:

-Do you think Sitting Bull would be a good leader in today’s society? Why or why not?


The teacher will collect the student responses along with the essays at the end of class.



Which students do you anticipate may struggle with the content/learning objectives of this lesson?

Student name

Evidence that the student needs differentiated instruction

How will you differentiate instruction in this lesson to support student learning?

Linda Bell


Linda has a hard time answering questions that go along with movies/videos. She focuses too much on answering the questions and tunes out the movie/video. Linda then gets frustrated and upset.

To differentiate learning, I will stand near Linda as the movie/video progresses. I will give hints as to when the answer to questions are coming up using verbal cues. This way she could focus on the movie/video and not keep looking at the questions. I could also review the questions with Linda before the movie/video begins, so she is familiar with all the questions.


Sitting Bull Video

Directions: Answer the following questions while watching the video.
1)What animal is Sitting Bull named after?

A: Buffalo

2)How did Sitting Bull draw his biography?

A: pictographs

3)How did the Sioux expand their territories?

A: through war

4)At what age did Sitting Bull become a man? AND How did he do this?

A: age 14; he ride up to an enemy Crow Tribe and touches them, but does not kill them

5)What was one of the activities Sitting Bull excelled in?

A: hunting buffalo

6)What were some character traits mentioned in the video describing Sitting Bull?

A: mercy, courage charisma

7)When was Sitting Bull elected Chief of the Sioux Nation?

A: 1857






Persuasive Essay : Sitting Bull

Student Name:     ________________________________________





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