The Plains Indians Curriculum Unit Christina Bell Ed 420 Professor Stambler 5/17/10 Table of Contents



Download 283.93 Kb.
Page4/6
Date conversion25.05.2016
Size283.93 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6


Teacher: Christina Bell

Grade Level: Grade 4

Topic: Plains Indians- Buffalo Economy
Content Standard 1: Knowledge of concepts and information from history and social studies is necessary to promote understanding of our nation and out world.


    1. Identify the cultures and traditions of Native American peoples before colonization

1.5 Describe the interaction of humans and the environment

NCSS Standards: See attached NCSS Matrix
Learner Background:

The students know that the Plains Indians main source of food are buffalo. What they will learn is that the Plains Indians mainly used the buffalo for basic survival, but the buffalo can also be used for economic survival. The students are already familiar with economic terms such as the selling, or trading of goods for profit. This idea will be applied to the creation of the Buffalo Hut.


Student Learning Objectives:
Cognitive: After reading different parts of the book Thunder on the Plains: The story of the American Buffalo by Ken Robbins, the student will be able to identify the history and economic uses of the American buffalo by the Plains Indians and white culture with 85% accuracy.

Psychomotor: After a class discussion on the Plains Indian’s use of the buffalo, the students will create their own Buffalo Hut and answer teacher-based questions about the hut, with 90% accuracy, and using a chart graphic organizer as a guide.


Affective: The student will show enthusiasm about the economic use of the American buffalo by participating in a teacher tally, with 100% participation.


Assessment:

Students will be observed throughout the class period by the teacher for 100% participation. To do this the teacher will make note of the students who participated during the lesson in a personal journal. The student will also be assessed on the completion of worksheet 1 (T-chart Graphic Organizer). The student will complete and be graded on worksheet number 2 (Buffalo Hut).


Materials/Resources:
Pen, pencil, dry-erase marker/chalk, chart graphic organizer, hut worksheet, buffalo picture, Thunder on the Plains: The Story of the American Buffalo by Ken Robbins
Learning Activities:
Initiation:
The teacher will show a picture a buffalo to the class. The teacher will ask:
1)What is this creature?

2)What are some of the physical characteristics of this creature?

2) How do you think this creature relates to our unit on the Plains Indians?
The teacher will have the students try and answer these questions, on a volunteer basis, but the teacher will soon clarify the student’s answers. The teacher will share quick facts/characteristics of the buffalo and relate to the Plains Indians.

-One of the largest wild animals that roam America today (since the dinosaurs)



-Adult buffalo is usually about six feet in height and weigh as much as a car
Lesson Development:
Concept 1: Buffalo did always roam in Plains of North America but actually originated in Asia.

The teacher will read from the book Thunder on the Plains: The story of the American Buffalo by Ken Robbins, to read a short history of how the buffalo came to grassy plains of North America.


KEY POINTS:

-Originated in Asia over fifty thousand years ago

-To look for more food the buffalo used a bridge connecting Asia Alaska to get to Alaska (now covered by the sea)

-Indian Tribes followed the buffalo on their journey from Asia to Alaska

-Indians faced harsh and icy winter conditions following the buffalo

-Buffalo eventually made it to the grassy plains of central North America



Concept 2: The “buffalo jump” is an effective method of hunting used by the Plains Indians to hunt and capture buffalo.
1)The teacher will now bring up the topic of hunting and ask the students: What is the main reason why the Plains Indians hunt the buffalo? (for food)
2)The teacher will hold up the picture of a buffalo and ask the students to predict how the Plains Indians may have hunted and killed the buffalo.
3)The teacher will explain a Plains Indian hunting technique call “the buffalo jump” using the book Thunder on the Plains: The Story of the American Buffalo by Ken Robbins as a guide.
KEY POINTS:

-The Indian braves, with the assistance of horses, would chase the buffalo around using by yelling, charging, and scaring them.

-The Indian braves would strategically lead the buffalo towards the edge of a cliff so that they were trapped.

- The buffalo in front would have no choice but to jump off the edge of the cliff.

-Fellow Indian braves would be waiting at the bottom of the cliff to collect, skin, and divide the meat of the dead buffalo.

Concept 3: To the Plains Indians, the buffalo were everything.
The teacher will reinforce that the buffalo were everything to the Plains Indians, and will ask the question: In what other ways do you think the Plains Indians used the buffalo?
The teacher will now have the students brainstorm about other ways the buffalo could be used in the Plains Indian culture. The teacher will pass out a chart graphic organizer to the students that will organize student-teacher discussion thoughts.

*The teacher will create a chart on the board and lead a discussion about the buffalo. The students will fill out the T-Chart graphic organizer as the group discussion takes place.


Ideas for chart:

Food: meat

Skin: shirts, shirts, trousers, shoes purses, blankets, bedding

Bones: knives, scraping blades, clubs, musical instruments (whistles, pipes)

Teeth: necklaces

Stomach: used as pots for cooking

Horns: for arrow points and bows

Hooves: made glue

Dung: burned for fuel
The teacher will ask the students to put the graphic organizers aside, because it will be used for an activity at the end of this lesson.
Concept 4: Applying the buffalo economy can be applied to real life situations.
The teacher will reinforce that although the Plains Indians used the buffalo for basic survival, the white people of the time period used the buffalo for economic survival.
The teacher will use the book Thunder on the Plains: The Story of the American Buffalo by Ken Robbins as a guide when explaining the white people’s economic uses of the buffalo.
KEY IDEA:

-Buffalo killed for their tongues and hides (trading or selling for money)


After briefly reading about the white economic use of the buffalo, the teacher will assign the students a task. The task will be that the students will create their own Buffalo Hut. In this Buffalo Hut the students can sell any of the items that the class talked about today! For example, the students can create a jewelry store, involving necklaces, earrings, etc., because the Plains Indians often used the buffalo’s teeth to create jewelry. The students will be given a blank picture of a hut. The student must:

  1. Pick a buffalo item you want to sell in your hut

  2. Draw a picture(s) of some of the Buffalo items being sold in your hut

  3. Name the hut based off what part of the Buffalo item you are selling

  4. Answer the following questions:

-What is the name of your hut?

-What are you selling and what part of the buffalo does this item come from?

-Why did you choose this particular item(s) to sell?

-How does this activity relate to the white people’s ideas of the economic uses of the

buffalo? Why?

Closure:

1)The teacher will end the lesson by having some of the students volunteer to present their Buffalo Hut in front of the class.


2)The teacher will summarize the lesson saying that the buffalo were everything to the Plains Indians in terms of basic survival. The teacher will also mention how the white people saw the buffalo for only economic reasons. The teacher will ask the students to hand in their Buffalo Huts for a grade.
3)The teacher will create a chart on the board tallying the students enthusiasm towards the lesson. The students will come up to the board and put a tally in the box that is appropriate to their thought of the lesson (Like, Dislike, Not Sure).


Which students do you anticipate may struggle with the content/learning objectives of this lesson?

Student name

Evidence that the student needs differentiated instruction

How will you differentiate instruction in this lesson to support student learning?

Edward Spalding




LD: Edward has a hard time listening to a story with full attention

I am going to move his seat to the front of the classroom, and also provide him with a paper copy of the story. This should help him to use both his listening and visual skills to follow along. This way Edward does not just have to just rely on his listening skills.



Name: ________________________







My Buffalo Hut

Directions:

1) Pick a buffalo item you want to sell in your hut

2) Draw a picture(s) of some of the Buffalo items being sold in your hut

3) Name the hut based off what part of the Buffalo item you are selling

4) Answer the questions at the end

tiki bar clip art



  1. What is the name of your hut?



  1. What are you selling and what part of the buffalo does this item come from?



  1. Why did you choose this particular item(s) to sell?



  1. How does this activity relate to the white people’s ideas of the economic uses of the

buffalo? Why?


Making A Poster : Buffalo Hut Rubric
Teacher Name: Miss Bell

Student Name:     ________________________________________









CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Required Elements

The worksheet includes all required elements as well as additional information.

All required elements are included on the worksheet.

All but 1 of the required elements are included on the worksheet.

Several required elements were missing.

Graphics - Relevance

All graphics are related to the topic and make it easier to understand.

All graphics are related to the topic and most make it easier to understand.

All graphics relate to the topic.

Graphics do not relate to the topic.

Attractiveness

The hut is exceptionally attractive in terms of design, layout, and neatness.

The hut is attractive in terms of design, layout and neatness.

The hut is acceptably attractive though it may be a bit messy.

The hut is distractingly messy or very poorly designed. It is not attractive.

Graphics - Originality

Several of the graphics used on the poster reflect a exceptional degree of student creativity in their creation and/or display.

One or two of the graphics used on the poster reflect student creativity in their creation and/or display.

The graphics are made by the student, but are based on the designs or ideas of others.

No graphics made by the student are included.

Questions

The student answers all 3 questions clearly and extensively.

The student answers all 3 questions clearly and in complete sentences.

The student answers all three questions in complete sentences.

The student answers less than three questions and is unclear.


*See T-chart using the following website:

http://worksheetworks.com/miscellanea/graphic-organizers/tchart.html



Teacher: Christina Bell

Grade Level: Grade 4

Topic: Plains Indians- The Role and Responsibilities of Women
Content Standard 3: Civic competence in addressing historical issues and current problems requires the use of information, skills, and empathic awareness.
3.2 Analyze and evaluate human action in historical and/or contemporary contexts from alternative points of view
NCSS Standards: See attached NCSS Matrix
Learner Background: The students have a basic idea of what roles and responsibilities are based on their everyday experiences at home, in school, and after school. The students already know how to create a friendly letter. The students are proficient with their skimming and scanning skills when reading articles, books, and computer information. The student does not know the extreme amount of labor a Plains Indian woman must go through on a day to day survival basis. The student does not know how to create a tipi, which is one of the many roles a Plains Indian woman must accomplish.
Student Learning Objectives:

Cognitive: After a skimming and scanning the article “Women’s Work is Never Done,” the student will recall specific information relating to the role of women in Plains Indian society.
Psychomotor: After a class discussion on the role of women and tipis, the student will create his/her own tipi using the directions in the book “Projects About the Plains Indians” as a guide.
Affective: After creating the tipi, the student will display positive support for the role of Plains Indian women after writing a friendly “thank you” letter for homework.

Assessment:

The students will be assessed based on highlights and notes that were taken as the students were skimming and scanning the article “Women’s Work is Never Done.” The teacher will walk around to monitor independent student reading, to make sure each student is on task. The teacher will also walk around and monitor students when they are creating their own tipis, by asking or answering student’s questions. The teacher will collect worksheet 1 on Tipis and grade the worksheet based on completion. The teacher will collect and grade the “thank you letter” homework assignment next class. (See attached rubric*)The teacher will also keep track of student participation by jotting down student’s names who are participating in class discussions.


Materials/Resources: pen, pencil, markers, dry-erase marker/chalk, “Women’s Work is Never Done”: http://www.bluecloud.org/work.html, worksheet 1 (Tipi Knowledge), “Projects About the Plains Indians,” by Marian Broida (and all included materials on pg 12), dictionary.com.
Learning Activities:


Initiation:

The students will start off the lesson talking about roles and/or responsibilities they may have today:

-What are some responsibilities you have at home? In school? After school?

-What does it mean to have a role in a place or society?

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/role (dictionary definition)

The teacher will review what a roles and responsibilities are through a class discussion, as an introduction to a lesson on the role and responsibilities of Plains Indian women.


Lesson Development:
Concept 1: Women have many roles and responsibilities in the Plains Indian society.
Teacher will introduce responsibilities of Plains Indian women using the article “Women’s Work is Never Done”: http://www.bluecloud.org/work.html
“The role of Plains Indian women was to support the hunters and warriors; a task that involved considerable labor.”
The teacher will assign the students to read the article “Women’s Work is Never Done.”
The teacher will tell the students to use their skimming and scanning skills in order to pick out the main information needed to understand the women’s roles and responsibilities in a Plains Indian society.
The students will highlight and write down the important in the article while reading independently.
Concept 2: A Plains Indian woman’s role in society is the key to survival.
The teacher will reconvene the groups and begin a student based discussion on the roles and responsibilities of the women in the Plains Indian society. The teacher will use the board and have the students write down what they learned in list form.
Example:

Responsibilities of Women in Plains Indian Culture:

1)putting up and breaking down tipi

2)creating travois

3)cook food (mainly buffalo)

4)make pemmican

5)create clothes from buffalo hide

Concept 3: Taking care of the tipi is a major role and responsibility for Plains Indian women.
The teacher will introduce the putting up and breaking down of the tipi as one of the main responsibilities of the women in Plains Indian society. The teacher will hand out worksheet 1 reviewing basic tipi knowledge.
http://www.teachervision.fen.com/tv/printables/0876287887_39.pdf
Concept 4: Creating your own tipi is a good way to learn about Plains Indian woman’s cultural responsibilities.
The teacher will read a quick blurb about a little Cheyenne girl “playing tipi.” The student will then create their own tipi using the directions from the book “Projects About the Plains Indians,” by Marian Broida. The students can decorate their tipis, if time permits, using markers.
Closure:

The teacher will review how the Plains Indian women played a very important role in society.


The teacher will assign the students to write a “thank you letter” to a Plains Indian women for all their hard work. The teacher will clarify all components that must be included in the letter. The letter will be collected and graded next class. (see attached rubric)*



Which students do you anticipate may struggle with the content/learning objectives of this lesson?

Student name

Evidence that the student needs differentiated instruction

How will you differentiate instruction in this lesson to support student learning?

Julie Hanson




The student has difficulty following step by step directions. She tries to breeze through the directions to try and finish before the other students. She tends to rush and not complete final products efficiently.

For this particular student I will bring in a student aid to stand by her as she goes through the directions. The aid will be used to make sure she slows down and follows each step of the directions carefully. If I cannot find an extra aid, I will make sure to pair Julie up with a partner, so that both students are going at the same pace together. This will help her to keep her from rushing through the directions and stay on task.





Letter-Writing : Thank You Letter
Teacher Name: Miss Bell

Student Name:     ________________________________________





1   2   3   4   5   6


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page