The Odyssey of Our Ancestors



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The Odyssey of Our Ancestors
During your genealogical adventures, you can discover many, many ancestors. In this game, you can become one of them and make the decisions they might have made. See for yourself what the Canadian migratory experience is all about.
Choose a time period:
Colonization 1604-1800

Building a Nation 1800-1900

Canada in the 20th Century 1900-2000
Colonization (1604-1800)

Choose between these two situations:


Immigrants to New France (1670)

United Empire Loyalists (1783)
Immigrants to New France (1670)
Choice 1

You are a young Frenchman, 18 years of age, and you volunteer to leave for the colony. You know you can become rich working in the fur trade. You await your embarkation at Bordeaux, France; you depart for Quebec City in New France. Travel to the new colony is very difficult. The ship on which you cross the ocean is crowded and dirty. You have run out of fresh fruits and vegetables and two people have scurvy.



Choice 2

You are a young Frenchman, 25 years of age, and you have been recruited by a seigneur of New France to settle in his seigneury. You await your embarkation at La Rochelle, France; you depart for Port Royal in Acadia. Travel to the colony is very dangerous. While crossing the Atlantic Ocean you ship runs into several huge storms. During one such storm you save a man from failing overboard.



Immigrants to New France (1670)
Choice 1

You disembark at Quebec City after a long trip. At the port you meet your cousin who invites you to settle in his seigneury. You settle in Beauport near Quebec City, next to your cousin. You help each other clear the land. Having family is a great help in the colony.


Choice 2

You disembark at Quebec City after a long trip. A Jesuit missionary offers you a three-year contract to serve in the West Mission. You leave Quebec City soon after you arrive there to follow a Jesuit missionary to the Mission of Kenté on the north shore of Lake Ontario.


Your final destination

Choice 1

You have worked on your land for 10 years now. The revenues are not what you expected when you came from France to Canada. You decide to sell your farm and use the money to move to Montréal where you begin work in the fur trade market (Foire de Montréal)


Fur Traders at Montréal, Québec.

Choice 2

You have worked on your land for 10 years; your farm is now well developed. You decide to marry the daughter of your neighbour. You are well established and pay your “cens et rens” to your seigneur each year.


The Basin of Quebec.
Your final destination
Choice 1

You have finished your three-year contract with the Jesuit missionaries; they offer you land in one of their seigneuries. You come back to the St. Lawrence Valley and settle on land granted by the Jesuits in Batiscan. You marry a “fille du Roy” who has arrived from France.


The King’s Daughters.
Choice 2

You have finished your three-year contract with the Jesuit missionaries; you stay in the “Pays-d’en-haut.” You become a “coureur de bois” and make your living in the fur trade. You live in the “Pays-d’en-haut”, where you have learned the Native language and married a wife from the country. Each year, you bring your furs to Fort Frontenac.


A settler’s log cabin.
Immigrants to New France (1670)
Choice 1

You disembark at Port Royal after a dangerous trip. You follow the owner who recruited you to his seigneurie. You settle near Grand Pré, on your seigneur’s property. The seigneur grants you land and you begin to farm.


Choice 2

You disembark at Port Royal and decide to break your contract. You get involved in the fishery business instead. You have been hired to work on a boat and you begin to earn some money in the fishery business.


Your final destination
Choice 1

The colonial war (1689-1697) creates instability in Acadia; you choose to leave your farm. You leave Acadia and go to Canada where you settle in the seigneury of St. Denis on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River.


Old Seignorial Manor on the St. Lawrence.
Choice 2

The colonial war (1689-1697) creates instability in Acadia; however, you are well settled and decide to stay on your land. You marry the daughter of your neighbour; together you have three boys and four girls, who settle in the same neighbourhood.


Jean Talon visiting settlers.
Your final destination
Choice 1

You work in the fishery provides you with enough money to settle in better circumstances than when you arrived 15 years ago. You buy land at Beaubassin in Acadia and marry the daughter of one of your friends from the fishing business. You have a family of three girls and one boy. You pay your yearly “redevance” to your seigneur.


Whale Fishing
Choice 2

You decide to reduce your involvement in the fishery business to settle in the St. Lawrence valley. You farm the land on the Rivière-Ouelle seigneury. You continue to work in the fishery business but on a seasonal basis. You marry and have 10 children who settle near you.


A View of the Bridge over the Berthier River, Quebec,

United Empire Loyalists (1783)
Choice 1

The Patriots have won the Revolutionary War. You are a Loyalist and now must leave the country. The British have offered to help you relocate in the colony of Nova Scotia, Canada. You travel from Connecticut to New York in the United States, where you board a ship destined for Nova Scotia, Canada. You must leave behind most of your belongings. You look forward to your new home in British North America where you have been promised free land and supplies from the British. However, you must first get through the 12 long days of travel on the water.


Choice 2

When the Revolutionary War broke out, you joined the newly formed Royal 84th Regiment; you have been captured and spend time in a military prison in Philadelphia in the United States. Upon your release, you discover that your land has been seized, so you travel to rejoin your regiment now stationed at Quebec City. You travel overland, take a barge across Lake Champlain and go down the Richelieu River on your way to Quebec City. Among the people travelling with you are soldiers and four Loyalist families who carry with them the few belongings they can take on the barge. You help the families portage when you come to the rapids.



United Empire Loyalists (1783)
Choice 1

Your ship anchors at a harbour in an unsettled area of Nova Scotia. The surveyors begin to measure plots of land of 20 hectares each. You draw lots for the land and the British commissary distributes the first promised provisions. You call your new settlement, Shelbourne. Your neighbours help each other clear the land, plant crops and build homes.



Choice 2

Your ship arrives and sets anchor at the St. John River in New Brunswick. You and your fellow Loyalists draw lots for the land. You settle in the town centre where you start a barbershop similar to the one you had at home. Your barbershop flourishes and you start buying provisions and selling them to the people in the settlement.



Your final destination

Choice 1

Your land yields an abundant harvest and you are thinking of selling surplus crops at the new farmer’s market. You realize that you like selling goods, so you begin work in moving goods from the region to the bigger markets in York (Toronto) and Montréal.



Bonsecours Market, Montreal, Quebec
Choice 2

You are tired of working on the farm. It is hard work and you are barely making a living. You decide to move to Saint John, New Brunswick, to build boats. Your farm continues to do well and you diversify by buying dairy cows. Now you will be able to sell both produce and milk.



Bedford Basin, from Near the Three Mile House, Nova Scotia.
Your final destination
Choice 1

You have married one of your neighbour’s daughters and now have three children. You help your wife start a school in the town. You love building boats. The shipping industry is booming in Saint John, New Brunswick; you and your family are comfortable living in a large home overlooking the Bay of Fundy.



Parrsboro, Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia

Choice 2

The town is not growing as quickly as you like so you decide to sell your store and move to Halifax, Nova Scotia. You will be able to open a much larger store there. You make good wages in the shipping industry and decide to go into politics in the new colony of New Brunswick. You move to Fredericton.


George Brown addressing an audience during an election campaign
United Empire Loyalists (1783)
Choice 1

Your regiment disbands so you depart for Montréal where you join the North West Company. You will try your luck at trading furs. You work in the fur trade for several years, stationed at Fort Michilimakinac. The fur trade is an exciting life.



Choice 2

You leave the military and join a group of Loyalists at Sorrel near Montréal. You will stay there for the winter and then travel west to the land purchased from the Mississauga Indians, on the Bay of Quinte. You settle on the Bay of Quinte and work with your neighbours to build a fine new settlement.


Your final destination
Choice 1

You have finished your three-year contract with the North West Company; you marry the daughter of one of the company’s officials and you and your wife move to Glengarry County, in Ontario. Being a Loyalist entitles you to a grant of land. Your neighbours help you clear the land, plant crops and build a house.



Process of clearing the Town-plot at Stanley, British Columbia
Choice 2

The North West Company merges with the Hudson Bay Company and you move to Fort Vancouver to become an official in the new company. You earn a good living working in the Hudson Bay Company; you get married and build a permanent home in Vancouver.



Fort Vancouver, British Columbia
Your final destination

Choice 1

Your farm is doing well so you decide to start a cheese factory in nearby Belleville, Ontario. Your cheese factory does so well that you sell the farm and build a fine new home on the Moira River.


Woollen Factory, Sherbrooke, Quebec.


Choice 2

Your family is growing and you need more of an income so you go to work in the timber industry, a seasonal trade. Your wife and children look after the farm. You save enough money from your job in the timber industry to stay at home and live comfortably on your farm. Your son keeps his job in the timber industry.
A Logger’s camp on Vancouver Island, British Columbia
Building a Nation (1800-1900)
Choose between these two situations
Emigrants from Great Britain (1815-1850)

Emigrants from Western Europe and China (1880s)
Emigrants from Great Britain (1815-1850)
Choice 1

Your family is devastated by the potato famine. You have not eaten properly for weeks and you are desperate to leave Ireland. You have arrived at Cork and will soon sail to Quebec City in Lower Canada. You leave Cork to sail for Quebec City. Once you arrive, you travel on to Montréal. Your ship is called a “coffin ship”. The People on board are dying of a dangerous disease called typhus. Canadian officials are placing the ship in quarantine at a station meant for this purpose at Grosse-Île.


Choice 2

Family members return to Scotland after Britain defeats Napoleon in the War of 1812. There is no work in Scotland so you decide to accept the British government’s offer of a new life in Upper Canada. You leave your beloved Scottish hills and walk to Glasgow where you depart for Quebec City in Lower Canada. The former soldiers of the family don’t mind the rough conditions during the two-month ocean crossing, but the rest of the family is anxious to see land.


Emigrants from Great Britain (1815-1850)
Choice 1

After a six-week quarantine, you are allowed to leave and do so, sad and alone; your spouse and two daughters have died on the island and you must leave them behind. You head for Montréal to take a job building the Lachine Canal. When work on the Lachine Canal is finished, you travel down the St. Lawrence to find work building the Rideau Canal.



Choice 2

You lose your spouse and son at Grosse-Île. They both die of the dreaded disease, typhus. You go to Montréal to find work. You work at jobs in Montréal until you find a permanent job in a brewery.



Your final destination
Choice 1

You work on the canal, moving north along the Rideau waterways. Once you reach the new city of Bytown (Ottawa) you decide to stay in the area and work in the timber trade. You marry in Bytown (Ottawa) and buy a small piece of land to farm. You continue to work part-time in the timber trade.


Timber slide with raft at Bytown (Ottawa, Ontario)
Choice 2

While working on the canals, you have learned to be a stonemason. You decide to settle down in Kingston. You find a job working for the Grand Trunk Railway laying tracks from Ottawa to Kingston. You save your money so that you can buy land soon and settle down with your spouse and family.


Last Overhead Bridge

Your final destination
Choice 1

You use your savings to move to York (Toronto) where, with a friend, you invest in a brewery of your own. Your brewery in York (Toronto) does so well that you get married. Together, you have two sons who will be a big help to you in your business.


York (Toronto), Ontario

Choice 2

You marry a French Canadian and decide to stay in Montréal, close to your wife’s parents. You stay in the brewery business. You marry and, eventually, two of your children start a new brewery in London, Ontario.


Tavern at Stanley, British Columbia
Emigrants from Great Britain (1815-1850)
Choice 1

You disembark at Quebec City and continue your journey up the St. Lawrence River to a village called Cornwall, located near the border of Upper Canada. You will stay there for the winter in a cold, drafty barracks. In the spring you will head for your new home. The British captain in charge of your group buys land from the Chippewa and Mississauga Indians. You travel to Brockville, in Ontario, then north to the Rideau River; there you receive a land lot and start to build your home.



Choice 2

You disembark at Quebec City where you establish your loved ones with the family of another soldier. You then sign up to do business with a fur trading company called the North West Company. Work in the fur trade is exciting but dangerous. There are many clashes between you company and its rivals. You love the challenge but your miss your family.


Your final destination
Choice 1

Your farm has prospered. A new brick house now replaces your former log cabin. The house even has glass windows. You are making a good living selling the maple syrup you have produced from the trees on your property.



Sugar making in Canada
Choice 2

Your sons cut trees on your property and ship them to the sawmill in Kingston. This is an excellent way to make extra money. You decide to build a sawmill of your own to benefit both you and your neighbours.


Habitant Wood chopper and sawyer
Your final destination
Choice 1

The North West Company merges with the Hudson Bay Company and you decide not to stay. You return to Montréal for your family. You have enough money to buy a small farm in the Niagara Region, in Ontario, and you move there to grow fruits and vegetables. You settle near St. Catherines in Ontario. The soil is very rich here. You now have five children who are a great help on the farm.


Ontario Homestead

Choice 2

When the North West Company and the Hudson Bay Company merge, a fellow fur trader decides to return home to Prince Edward Island. You and your family leave Montréal to join him. You grow potatoes in the rich soil of Prince Edward Island and two of your children work in the fishing industry to earn extra money.


Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

Emigrants from Western Europe and China (1880s)
Choice 1

You leave your wife and young son in the province of Guangdong, Southern China, to come to Canada to work on building the Canadian Pacific Railway. You await your embarkation at Shanghai in China; your destination is San Francisco, United States. Once you arrive, you go on to Vancouver in British Columbia, Canada. The travel to the new colony is very difficult. The ship you are travelling on is crowded and dirty. Everyone on board has been recruited to work on the railway.


Choice 2

You leave your homeland in Iceland because the volcanic activity of Mount Askja has left you homeless. The first part of your journey takes you to London, England. From there you depart for Quebec City in Canada. Your trip to Canada is extremely dangerous. Navigation has been particularly difficult because of harsh weather during the entire trans-Atlantic crossing. Your ship is caught in a violent storm and is almost forced to return to London.



Emigrants from Western Europe and China (1880s)
Choice 1

You work with a Chinese crew laying track and blasting through the hard granite rock. It is dangerous work and many are killed. You send as much money as you can to your family back in China. Construction of the railway is finished, and you are out of work. You cannot afford the fare home to China so you travel back to Vancouver, British Columbia, where you find work in a Chinese laundry.



Choice 2

You work as a bookkeeper in the railway office. Eventually you become the Superintendent in charge of recruiting workers from China. Your work is much easier than of other Chinese workers. Construction of the railway is finished, but you have saved your money. You start an import-export business in which your dealings are mainly with your many contacts in China.



Your final destination
Choice 1

You are disappointed when the Head Tax is raised to $100 and then to $500. You despair of never being able to bring your family to Canada. You decide to move east to Toronto, Ontario, to find work in a restaurant. Your restaurant does well and you are able to pay the $500 Head Tax for your wife and your son to join you in Canada.


New Westminster, British Columbia

Choice 2

You are disappointed when the Head Tax is raised to $100 and then to $500. You despair of never being able to bring your family to Canada. You open your own laundry and continue to save your money. You learn your wife has died but you send for your son who comes to join you in Toronto, Ontario. You and your son open a second restaurant.


Arch in the Chinese community

Your final destination
Choice 1

Your import-export business does well. You invest in a fish-packing plant in Vancouver Island and move there to live. You send for your wife and son in China and they join you on Vancouver Island. You have two more children and employ many Chinese workers in your plant.


Chinese tailor
Choice 2

You stay in Vancouver, British Columbia, but return to China briefly to bring back your wife and son. Your import-export business continues to do well. You pay the $500 Head Tax required for each person, and bring your younger brother and his family to live with you. Later, you will bring other members of your family to Canada.


Chinese houses in Chinese quarter
Emigrants from Western Europe and China (1880s)
Choice 1

After four weeks aboard the ship, you disembark at Quebec City. You take the railway to Rousseau in the Muskoka District of Ontario. The Canadian government offers jobs with modest wages, which help you, become more settled. You are working hard but making little progress developing the land provided by the government.



Choice 2

After four weeks aboard the ship, you disembark at Quebec City. You take the railway to Kinmount, northwest of Toronto, Ontario. Family members find work on the Victoria Railway in Kinmount; however, once the job is finished they are out of work. Your land still needs a lot of work. The conditions here are not much better that those you faced in Iceland.



Your final destination

Choice 1

You decide to leave your new settlement and join another group of Icelanders on a journey north of Lake Winnipeg, in the Northwest Territories. You live in an Icelandic reserve established by the Canadian government. You are allowed to create your own laws and set up your own schools. The reserve is called New Iceland.


Dutch settlers.
Choice 2

You stay in Rosseau and continue to clear the land and make a new settlement. Seasonal jobs in the timber industry help your family survive. You leave Rosseau and go north to Sudbury, Ontario, where several of your family members find work in one of the new mines. You decide to settle there.


Miners’ Camp
Your final destination
Choice 1

You leave crops behind and sell your livestock at low prices so that you can join other Icelanders in moving west to a new settlement north of Winnipeg. After a short stay in New Iceland, you and your family move to a new life in North Dakota, United States.


Winnipeg, Manitoba
Choice 2

You stay in Kinmount, Ontario, and raise a family of five. During harvest time, family members seek work on other farms to help pay the bills of your farm. You leave Kinmount and move to Toronto where your love of books leads to a job in a library.


Yonge Street, Toronto, Ontario
Canada in the 20th Century 1900-2000
Choose between these two situations
Emigrants from Eastern Europe (1908)

Emigrants from Africa (1982)
Emigrants from Eastern Europe (1908)
Choice 1

You are a 39-year-old fruit farmer of Jewish heritage, living just outside the city of Gomel in Russia. Your family wants to leave Russia because of the persecution Jewish people face there. You hear that Canada is offering free land to immigrants. Imagine, owning your own land! You have travelled overland to the port of St. Petersburg and now await your embarkation. Your point of entry will be Saint John, New Brunswick, in Canada. The ship is crowded but you and your fellow countrymen find room for yourselves. Your former neighbour who now lives near Calgary, Alberta, in Canada, has promised to help your family get a fresh start in his community.



Choice 2 You are a 22-year-old man from Ukraine. You see a book written by Dr. Josef Oleskow that urges Ukrainians to go to Canada. You decide this might be a good option for you. There is not enough land at home, and in Canada, you might eventually own your own farm. After a long, overland journey to Odessa, Russia, you take a ship to London, England, where you depart for Halifax, Nova Scotia, in Canada. You are several weeks at sea. You have never been to sea before and endure constant seasickness. You have met several other Ukrainians on board and they have helped you pass the time. It is wonderful to have found some people who speak the same language.
Emigrants from Eastern Europe (1908)
Choice 1

You disembark at Saint John, New Brunswick, cold and tired and not able to rest. The official does not know how to spell your name so he gives you a new name, Smith. You must board a train heading for the Canadian West. You get off the train in Calgary and are met by your friend and former neighbour. You pay your $10 fee for registering your land, buy some basic supplies and head for your new homestead. Your neighbour and his sons will help you build your first home.



Choice 2

After you land in Saint John, New Brunswick, you are offered a job working for a Jewish family in Montréal, Quebec. You decide to postpone your trip to the West until you can make some extra money. You travel by train to Montréal. When you arrive in Montréal, you start work in a shop that makes ready-to-wear clothing. It is a tiresome job but you will save your money to someday buy a shop of your own.


Your final destination
Choice 1

Fruit will not grow well in this type of soil and climate, so your learn how to grow wheat. There is a huge market for this “prairie gold” and you have just bought two new machines, a binder and a steam thresher, to help you harvest the wheat. You rent out the steam thresher to your neighbours and soon recoup the money you spent on it. You decide to stay on the farm.


N. Bolgar digging potatoes
Choice 2

Farming on the prairies is hard work. Although the agriculture business is booming, you look for an easier way to make a living. Your family invests in a business that sells steam farm machinery. You move to Toronto, Ontario, where your new business is located.


Farming by the Mance Farming Company of Viking, Alberta
Your final destination
Choice 1

You prosper in the clothing business. You marry into a Jewish family in Montréal and expand your business. You now have three children. They all have a good education and you are proud of the new life your family has made in Canada.


McGill University, Montreal, Quebec.


Choice 2

You prosper but decide it is time to join some friends in a Jewish settlement near Calgary, Alberta. You will start a new business there. You marry in Calgary and start up a new clothing business. People here like ready-made clothing as much as they did in Montréal.


Man guides automatic cloth cutter.
Emigrants from Eastern Europe (1908)
Choice 1

You arrive in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and board a crowded passenger train headed for Winnipeg, Manitoba. When you reach Winnipeg, Manitoba, you discover that there are lots of Ukrainians. You stay at the Immigration Hall for a week until you find work at a local newspaper office. You find a place to stay in a boarding house owned by a Ukrainian family who once lived in a town near your own in Russia.


Choice 2

After your arrival in Halifax, you are taken to a train station where you soon begin your week-long journey to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Once in Saskatoon, you buy a horse and wagon to take you the rest of the way to your allotted 64 hectares of land. Once there, your family builds a temporary house.


Your final destination
Choice 1

You like Winnipeg, and decide to live in the city rather than on the farm. You find a job in a newspaper office. You marry, have two children and start your own newspaper in Winnipeg. You do all you can to be a spokesperson for Ukrainian people.


Wedding of a pioneer family

Choice 2

You homestead some land outside Winnipeg. Your neighbours come and help you get started. Your farm in not doing as well as you had wished. You move back to Winnipeg and find a job in one of the new factories.



View of Winnipeg, Manitoba
Your final destination
Choice 1

Family members become hired hands on other farms to make extra money and to learn how to grow crops in Canada. Your family learns excellent farming techniques from your neighbours and after a few years, all members of your family are able to quit their jobs and stay at home on your prospering farm.


Ukrainians with types of buildings
Choice 2

You plant your crops and wait for the harvest. A drought ruins your crops. You decide to leave the farm and move to Saskatoon, where family members can find work in a factory. Your children are growing up quickly. One works in a bank, two are employed in a factory, and another is a police officer. Your fourth child marries and moves to Edmonton, Alberta.


Interior, Bank of Montreal
Emigrants from Africa (1982)

Choice 1

You are a young teacher from Uganda. The election held in 1980 made you realize that Uganda would not remain democratic for much longer. You flee to Kenya, where you apply for and receive refugee status. In Nairobi you await your flight to Toronto, Ontario, in Canada. The food served during your flight is different from the food you usually eat. You are not sure you like it. Your flight is not direct and you stop at London, England, and at Halifax, Nova Scotia, before you arrive in Toronto.



Choice 2

You are a South African journalist, victim of the apartheid. You have decided to emigrate because of the violence and uprisings. At Maseru, in Lesotho, you board a plane destined for Montréal, Quebec, in Canada. Your flight is very turbulent and you must keep your seat belt on for most of the long trip.



Emigrants from Africa (1982)
Choice 1

You disembark at Toronto where you are met by an immigration official. He takes you to your temporary lodgings where you will stay until you find a job and lodgings of your own. Ontario will not accept your teaching qualifications so you enrol in Teachers College. You find a job cleaning offices at night to help you with living expenses.



Choice 2

You arrive in Toronto where you are met by a friend of your father. He gives you a job in his cleaning business and you live at his home until you get settled and find a place of your own. You fall in love with a member of your host’s family and decide to stay in the cleaning business.


Your final destination
Choice 1

You obtain your teaching qualifications for Ontario and find a job teaching in downtown Toronto. You work hard to lose your Ugandan accent. You join a theatre group and meet your future spouse who works as a nurse. You marry and buy a townhouse in the west part of Toronto. You both continue to work and to enjoy the theatre group.


Interior view, Salle Wilfrid Pelletier, Expo ’67.
Choice 2

You obtain your teaching qualifications but cannot find a job in Toronto. You move to Hamilton and accept a job in an insurance office. You become frustrated with teaching and decide to go back to school to study physiotherapy.



Physiotherapist

Your final destination
Choice 1

You marry into your host’s family and take over many new duties in your father-in-law’s business. You and your spouse have two children. You eventually buy out the business from your father-in-law who wants to retire and enjoy his grandchildren.


Woman in grocery store
Choice 2

You marry into your host’s family and move to Markham where you buy a house and start up a new branch of the business. The new business is doing well. You now have three children and you have joined several interest groups in the community.


West Indian students
Emigrants from Africa (1982)

Choice 1

A friend picks you up at the airport in Montréal. You stay with him while you get settled in your new job and find a place of your own. You find the weather to be cold in Montréal, so you decide to move to Victoria on Vancouver Island.


Choice 2

You book into a hotel in Montréal and take a taxi to your new newspaper’s office. You are eager to begin your new job. Your new job is all that you thought it would be. You meet an engineer and you make plans to buy a house together.


Your final destination

Choice 1

You move to Victoria and begin work for your new firm almost immediately. You become the editor-in-chief. You marry a doctor with a busy practice. You plan to continue to live in Victoria.


Surgeons, administration of plasma
Choice 2

You like Victoria, but you find most of your work is in Vancouver; after a short stay, you move to a condominium in Vancouver. You marry and now have three children. You spouse works as an engineer and you share the duties of raising your children.


Aluminum company,

Your final destination
Choice 1

You find the perfect house in Old Montréal; you get married and both of you continue to work. You have two children. One plans to be an engineer and the other a dancer.


Jamaica National Ballet

Choice 2

Your relationship ends and you decide it is better to move to Toronto. You marry in Toronto and buy a house there. You new spouse wants to move to Vancouver to be closer to family members and to escape the cold Ontario winters.


Vancouver, British Columbia. Great International Bathtub Race



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