The Fisherman and his Wife



Download 160.8 Kb.
Page1/3
Date conversion19.05.2016
Size160.8 Kb.
  1   2   3
Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm - “The Fisherman and his Wife” - Grade 3

Translated by Lucy Crane. Originally published in Household Stories by the Brothers Grimm, New York: Dover Publications, 1886.


Learning Objective: The goal of this five-day exemplar is to explicitly model the process of searching for and interpreting intra-textual connections. In this lesson sequence, the teacher poses an analytic focusing question and then guides students in gathering and interpreting evidence from the text in order to come to a deeper understanding of the story. Simple word play and art activities give students practice in closely attending to language and word choice, and in visualizing and recording their interpretations. Discussion and a short writing exercise help students to synthesize what they have learned.

Rationale: Authors make intentional choices. Questioning those choices leads to a deeper understanding of literature. Access to this understanding often rests on the ability to identify patterns, connections, and anomalies within a text. While some children come to school in the habit of approaching literature inquisitively, many do not. Young children need experience with asking interpretive questions and using the text itself to answer them. More importantly, students need to feel the thrill of discovery, as their exploration leads them to a new understanding of the reading. Discussion and teacher “think-alouds” are valuable tools in this process; but for elementary students, active engagement through art, word play, and drama provide a deeper, lasting level of understanding and discovery.
Reading Task: Students will silently read the text independently. Then, a second reading is done together, with discussion, to ensure a basic, literal understanding of the story. In response to an interpretive focusing question posed by the teacher, students then engage with the text a third time as they work in small groups to re-read the text and mark evidence in it. Through art, students actively engage with the evidence they have found. Discussion and a short writing task help students to interpret their evidence and solidify their thinking. The goal is to provide students with repeatedly opportunities to engage with complex text and gain confidence in their ability to do so independently.
Discussion/Language Tasks: In this exemplar, students process information orally using both discussion and word play. It is important that this lesson sequence be taught in heterogeneous groups, so that discussion presents a variety of levels of thinking. Children learn to infer and to interpret literature largely by hearing others do so. This type of modeling is most effective if it comes from both teachers and peers. In addition to small and large group discussion, students use word play to understand, and become comfortable with, some of the differences between written and spoken language. “Playing” with words and sentences allows children to explore complex grammar and sentence structure in a developmentally appropriate way and increases their ability to learn words from context.
Writing Task: As a culminating activity, students synthesize their findings in an opinion paragraph, using specific references to the text. In this lesson, writing helps the children to organize and make sense of their thinking. For most third graders, writing is a relatively new tool for processing thought and one they will need to learn to use. Therefore, this task is highly guided and instructional, providing a model that can be used more independently on subsequent writing tasks.

Outline of Lesson Plan: This lesson can be delivered in five days of instruction and reflection on the part of students and their teacher, with the possibility of additional days devoted to further exploring the text through the use of drama or revising their opinion paragraphs after receiving teacher or peer feedback.
Standards Addressed: The following Common Core State Standards are the focus of this exemplar: RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3, RL.3.4, RL.3.5, RL.3.10; W.3.1, W.3.4, W.3.5, W.3.10, W.4.9; L.3.3, L.3.6; SL.3.1

The Text: Grimm, Jacob and Wilhelm. “The Fisherman and his Wife” translated by Lucy Crane


Exemplar Text

Vocabulary

THERE was once a fisherman and his wife who lived together in a hovel by the sea-shore, and the fisherman went out every day with his hook and line to catch fish, and he angled and angled.

One day he was sitting with his rod and looking into the clear water, and he sat and sat. At last down went the line to the bottom of the water, and when he drew it up he found a great flounder on the hook.

And the flounder said to him, “Fisherman, listen to me; let me go, I am not a real fish but an enchanted prince. What good shall I be to you if you land me? I shall not taste well; so put me back into the water again, and let me swim away."

"Well," said the fisherman, "no need of so many words about the matter; as you can speak, I had much rather let you swim away." Then he put him back into the clear water, and the flounder sank to the bottom... Then the fisherman got up and went home to his wife in their hovel.

"Well, husband," said the wife, "have you caught nothing to-day?"

"No," said the man--"that is, I did catch a flounder, but as he said he was an enchanted prince, I let him go again."

"Then, did you wish for nothing?" said the wife.

"No," said the man; "what should I wish for?"

"Oh dear!" said the wife; "and it is so dreadful always to live in this evil-smelling hovel; you might as well have wished for a little cottage; go again and call him; tell him we want a little cottage, I daresay he will give it us; go, and be quick."
And when he went back, the sea was green and yellow, and not nearly so clear. So he stood and said,

"O man, O man!--if man you be,

Or flounder, flounder, in the sea--

Such a tiresome wife I've got,

For she wants what I do not."
Then the flounder came swimming up, and said, "Now then, what does she want?"

"Oh," said the man, "you know when I caught you my wife says I ought to have wished for something. She does not want to live any longer in the hovel, and would rather have a cottage.

"Go home with you," said the flounder, "she has it already."

So the man went home, and found, instead of the hovel, a little cottage, and his wife was sitting on a bench before the door. And she took him by the hand, and said to him,

"Come in and see if this is not a great improvement."

So they went in, and there was a little house-place and a beautiful little bedroom, a kitchen and larder, with all sorts of furniture, and iron and brassware of the very best. And at the back was a little yard with fowls and ducks, and a little garden full of green vegetables and fruit.

"Look," said the wife, "is not that nice?"

"Yes," said the man, "if this can only last we shall be very well contented."

"We will see about that," said the wife. And after a meal they went to bed.

So all went well for a week or fortnight, when the wife said,

"Look here, husband, the cottage is really too confined, and the yard and garden are so small; I think the flounder had better get us a larger house; I should like very much to live in a large stone castle; so go to your fish and he will send us a castle."

"O my dear wife," said the man, "the cottage is good enough; what do we want a castle for?"

"We want one," said the wife; "go along with you; the flounder can give us one."

"Now, wife," said the man, "the flounder gave us the cottage; I do not like to go to him again, he may be angry."

"Go along," said the wife, "he might just as well give us it as not; do as I say!"

The man felt very reluctant and unwilling; and he said to himself, "It is not the right thing to do;" nevertheless he went.

So when he came to the seaside, the water was purple and dark blue and grey and thick, and not green and yellow as before. And he stood and said,
"O man, O man!--if man you be,

Or flounder, flounder, in the sea--

Such a tiresome wife I've got,

For she wants what I do not."


"Now then, what does she want?" said the flounder.

"Oh," said the man, half frightened, "she wants to live in a large stone castle."

"Go home with you, she is already standing before the door," said the flounder.

Then the man went home, as he supposed, but when he got there, there stood in the place of the cottage a great castle of stone, and his wife was standing on the steps, about to go in; so she took him by the hand, and said, "Let us enter."

With that he went in with her, and in the castle was a great hall with a marble pavement, and there were a great many servants, who led them through large doors, and the passages were decked with tapestry, and the rooms with golden chairs and tables, and crystal chandeliers hanging from the ceiling; and all the rooms had carpets. And the tables were covered with eatables . . . for anyone who wanted them. And at the back of the house was a great stable-yard for horses and cattle, and carriages of the finest; besides, there was a splendid large garden, with the most beautiful flowers and fine fruit trees, and a pleasance full half a mile long, with deer and oxen and sheep, and everything that heart could wish for.

"There!" said the wife, "is not this beautiful?"

"Oh yes," said the man, "if it will only last we can live in this fine castle and be very well contented."

"We will see about that," said the wife, "in the meanwhile we will sleep upon it." With that they went to bed.

The next morning the wife was awake first, just at the break of day, and she looked out and saw from her bed the beautiful country lying all round. The man took no notice of it, so she poked him in the side with her elbow, and said,

"Husband, get up and just look out of the window. Look, just think if we could be king over all this country. Just go to your fish and tell him we should like to be king."

"Now, wife," said the man, "what should we be kings for? I don't want to be king."

"Well," said the wife, "if you don't want to be king, I will be king."

"Now, wife," said the man, "what do you want to be king for? I could not ask him such a thing."

"Why not?" said the wife, "you must go directly all the same; I must be king."

So the man went, very much put out that his wife should want to be king.

"It is not the right thing to do--not at all the right thing," thought the man. He did not at all want to go, and yet he went all the same.

And when he came to the sea the water was quite dark grey, and rushed far inland, and had an ill smell. And he stood and said,

"O man, O man!--if man you be,

Or flounder, flounder, in the sea--

Such a tiresome wife I've got,

For she wants what I do not."
"Now then, what does she want?" said the fish.

"Oh dear!" said the man, "she wants to be king."

"Go home with you, she is so already," said the fish.

So the man went back, and as he came to the palace he saw it was very much larger, and had great towers and splendid gateways; the herald stood before the door, and a number of soldiers with kettle-drums and trumpets. And when he came inside everything was of marble and gold, and there were many curtains with great golden tassels. Then he went through the doors of the salon to where the great throne-room was, and there was his wife sitting upon a throne of gold and diamonds, and she had a great golden crown on, and the sceptre in her hand was of pure gold and jewels, and on each side stood six pages in a row, each one a head shorter than the other. So the man went up to her and said,

"Well, wife, so now you are king!"

"Yes," said the wife, "now I am king."

So then he stood and looked at her, and when he had gazed at her for some time he said,

"Well, wife, this is fine for you to be king! Now there is nothing more to wish for."

"O husband!" said the wife, seeming quite restless, "I am tired of this already. Go to your fish and tell him that now I am king I must be emperor."

"Now, wife," said the man, "what do you want to be emperor for?"

"Husband," said she, "go and tell the fish I want to be emperor."

"Oh dear!" said the man, "he could not do it--I cannot ask him such a thing. There is but one emperor at a time; the fish can't possibly make any one emperor--indeed he can't."

"Now, look here," said the wife, "I am king, and you are only my husband, so will you go at once? Go along! For if he was able to make me king he is able to make me emperor; and I will and must be emperor, so go along!"

So he was obliged to go; and as he went he felt very uncomfortable about it, and he thought to himself, "It is not at all the right thing to do; to want to be emperor is really going too far; the flounder will soon be beginning to get tired of this."

With that he came to the sea, and the water was quite black and thick, and the foam flew, and the wind blew, and the man was terrified. But he stood and said,
"O man, O man!--if man you be,

Or flounder, flounder, in the sea--

Such a tiresome wife I've got,

For she wants what I do not."


"What is it now?" said the fish.

"Oh dear!" said the man, "my wife wants to be emperor."

"Go home with you," said the fish, "she is emperor already."

So the man went home, and found the castle adorned with polished marble and alabaster figures, and golden gates. The troops were being marshalled before the door, and they were blowing trumpets and beating drums and cymbals; and when he entered he saw barons and earls and dukes waiting about like servants; and the doors were of bright gold. And he saw his wife sitting upon a throne made of one entire piece of gold, and it was about two miles high; and she had a great golden crown on, which was about three yards high . . .

So the man went up to her and said, "Well, wife, so now you are emperor."

"Yes," said she, "now I am emperor."

Then he went and sat down and had a good look at her, and then he said, "Well now, wife, there is nothing left to be, now you are emperor."

"We will see about that," said the wife. With that they both went to bed; but she was as far as ever from being contented, and she could not get to sleep for thinking of what she should like to be next.

The husband, however, slept as fast as a top after his busy day; but the wife tossed and turned from side to side the whole night through, thinking all the while what she could be next, but nothing would occur to her; and when she saw the red dawn she slipped off the bed, and sat before the window to see the sun rise, and as it came up she said, "Ah, I have it! What if I should make the sun and moon to rise--husband!" she cried, and stuck her elbow in his ribs, "Wake up, and go to your fish, and tell him I want power over the sun and moon."

The man was so fast asleep that when he started up he fell out of bed. Then he shook himself together, and opened his eyes and said, "Oh,--wife, what did you say?"

"Husband," said she, "if I cannot get the power of making the sun and moon rise when I want them, I shall never have another quiet hour. Go to the fish and tell him so."

"O wife!" said the man, and fell on his knees to her, "the fish can really not do that for you. I grant you he could make you emperor . . . do be contented with that, I beg of you."

And she became wild with impatience, and screamed out, "I can wait no longer, go at once!"

And so off he went as well as he could for fright. And a dreadful storm arose, so that he could hardly keep his feet; and the houses and trees were blown down, and the mountains trembled, and rocks fell in the sea; the sky was quite black, and it thundered and lightened; and the waves, crowned with foam, ran mountains high. So he cried out, without being able to hear his own words,


"O man, O man!--if man you be,

Or flounder, flounder, in the sea--

Such a tiresome wife I've got,

For she wants what I do not."


"Well, what now?" said the flounder.

"Oh dear!" said the man, "she wants to order about the sun and moon."

"Go home with you!" said the flounder, "you will find her in the old hovel."

And there they are sitting to this very day.




Small, dirty, or poorly built house; to fish with a hook, line, and rod

Edible, flatfish found in shallow, coastal waters

Old-fashioned word meaning “will”

Annoying

In front of

Small, cramped


Unwilling or unsure about doing something

A quiet, tree-planted area with paths


Happy and satisfied

A fancy room in a large house where people entertain their guests
A staff used during ceremonies to show their importance
A young boy who ran errands
A man who rules an empire

Brought together and organized
On



Day One: Instructional Exemplar for The Grimms’ “The Fisherman and his Wife”

Summary of Activities

  1. Teacher introduces the text with minimal commentary and students read it independently (10 minutes).

  2. Teacher guides students through a second reading aloud, stopping for discussion as needed to ensure basic comprehension (15 minutes).

  3. Students work in small groups to complete a “Word Play” activity (20 minutes).




Text Passage under Discussion

Directions for Teachers/Guiding Questions For Students

THERE was once a fisherman and his wife who lived together in a hovel by the sea-shore, and the fisherman went out every day with his hook and line to catch fish, and he angled and angled.

One day he was sitting with his rod and looking into the clear water, and he sat and sat. At last down went the line to the bottom of the water, and when he drew it up he found a great flounder on the hook.

And the flounder said to him, “Fisherman, listen to me; let me go, I am not a real fish but an enchanted prince. What good shall I be to you if you land me? I shall not taste well; so put me back into the water again, and let me swim away."
[Read intervening paragraphs.]
"O man, O man!--if man you be,

Or flounder, flounder, in the sea--

Such a tiresome wife I've got,

For she wants what I do not."


"Well, what now?" said the flounder.

"Oh dear!" said the man, "she wants to order about the sun and moon."

"Go home with you!" said the flounder, "you will find her in the old hovel."

And there they are sitting to this very day.


THERE was once a fisherman and his wife who lived together in a hovel by the sea-shore, and the fisherman went out every day with his hook and line to catch fish, and he angled and angled.

One day he was sitting with his rod and looking into the clear water, and he sat and sat. At last down went the line to the bottom of the water, and when he drew it up he found a great flounder on the hook.

And the flounder said to him, “Fisherman, listen to me; let me go, I am not a real fish but an enchanted prince. What good shall I be to you if you land me? I shall not taste well; so put me back into the water again, and let me swim away."
[Read intervening paragraphs.]
"O man, O man!--if man you be,

Or flounder, flounder, in the sea--

Such a tiresome wife I've got,

For she wants what I do not."


"Well, what now?" said the flounder.

"Oh dear!" said the man, "she wants to order about the sun and moon."

"Go home with you!" said the flounder, "you will find her in the old hovel."

And there they are sitting to this very day.



1. Introduce the passage and students read independently.

Keep this introduction short. Explain that this is a very old story and parts of the text may be difficult to read because they contain old-fashioned words or say things in unusual ways. If the students are unfamiliar with fairy tales and folktales, you may choose, instead, to read the story aloud. Do this first reading with expression, using your voice to make meaning clear, preferably without stopping for discussion. This will help children to develop a mental model of how the story could sound when read fluently.


2. Guide the students through a second reading aloud, stopping for discussion as needed to ensure basic comprehension.

The basic plot of this story should be easy for most students to understand. However, unabridged fairy tales like this one are often challenging to read for several reasons:



  • Domain specific vocabulary: Fairy tales commonly use words like “shall” and “upon” Most of this vocabulary can be picked up quickly by children with just a little explanation and practice in context.

  • Context: Some students may need a general understanding of the social/political hierarchy (and its connection with wealth and power) at the time this story was written. Help students to infer this information from the story by asking questions like, “Do you think an emperor was richer or more powerful than a king? What, in the story, makes you think so?”

  • Sentence structure: Sentences are constructed differently, and words are used in unfamiliar ways. This is due both to the age of the text and the fact that the story has been translated. With practice, students can develop a wider repertoire of familiar grammatical structures, as well as strategies for approaching text with unfamiliar grammar or syntax.


3. Students work in small groups to complete a “Word Play” activity.

Teachers should break students up into pairs and have them work through the exercises on the two word play activity sheets. The first sheet ensures that students understand the unusual grammatical construction of the verse the fisherman repeats at the water’s edge. The second sheet highlights the difference between written and spoken language and focuses on the use of contractions. Both sheets explore conventions by asking students to observe, reflect upon, and then produce language. This connection between oral and written language and between receptive and expressive language, builds a bridge that helps students internalize language structures and strengthens their reading comprehension.




  1   2   3


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page