The Development of Western Canada Laura Dichiaro, Ashley Jack, Helen Petrullo



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The Development of Western Canada
Laura Dichiaro, Ashley Jack, Helen Petrullo

Dave Pidberezny, & Jessica Swift
EDUC 8Y29
Brock University
Dr. Rutherford

Unit Plan Overview
Strand:

The Development of Western Canada; History: Grade 8


Purpose/goals:

The purpose of the Development of Western Canada unit for grade eight students is to identify and explore the factors that contributed to the change and growth of the new Dominion westward during the late 18th century.


This is the second strand of the grade eight Social Studies curriculum being taught at St. Alexander; however, it is the students’ first, in-depth look, at the study of how and why the Dominion expanded as a result of the settlement and development of Canada west. Such rudimentary exposure to early Canadian history denotes that a strong emphasis must be placed on capturing the students’ attention early on in the unit through engaging learning activities, meaningful discussions, and inclusive culminating tasks. It is hoped with this type of instruction students will be motivated to continue on with their investigation of Canadian History in secondary school.
Overall Expectations:

Include the following p.61:



  • Use a variety of resources and tools to gather, process, and communicate information about conflicts and changes that occurred during the development of Western Canada.

  • Describe the effects of development on various groups of people in the region from a variety of perspectives.


Context:

During this five week unit (double period/70 minute classes), it is anticipated that students will complete a number of assignments through various hands-on learning activities to further stimulate and enhance their inquiry/research and communication skills surrounding the particular strand being studied. It is intended that through such authentic activities as web quests, power point presentations, visual arts assignments, and role play, student awareness and understanding of the early history of their country will be improved significantly.


This unit will culminate with a final group project in which students present their findings in a power point presentation using largely primary and secondary resources they found on such themes as:

    • Rupert’s Land

    • Hudson’s Bay Company

    • Métis, First Nations peoples

    • Louis Riel

    • Red River Settlement

    • Red River Rebellion

    • Opening of the West – the railway and populating the west

Challenges:

  • The subjects commonly taught on rotary in grade eight (history/geography/science/physical education) are taught in blocks at St. Alexander. Therefore, the students study each in isolation for a specified period of time instead of on a daily cycle format. Such a structured course schedule can impose time constraints and limitations which can make it difficult and challenging to cover all the intended material.

  • There will be many cross-curricular connections made throughout this unit with Language, Visual Arts, and Drama

  • Technology will play an integral component in the teaching and learning process during this unit. For example, web quests, power point presentations, and pictures will be incorporated to enrich the lessons.


Organization Frameworks:

  • Centers will be utilized throughout this unit. It is intended that these groups will be designed so that students feel comfortable and confident working together on assignments and projects as well as with helping each other during individual seat work and participating in group discussion.

  • This collaborative setting in the classroom is also more conducive to activities like role play, debate and discussion, and art projects.

  • Instructional strategies for this unit will be based primarily on the design down approach while also including cooperative learning, centers, hands-on, problem-solving, and computer assisted strategies.

  • Tasks for the students during this unit will include: research and investigation projects, oral reports, role-play, multi-media presentations, and work samples.







Development of Western Canada
Lesson 1
Introduction to primary and secondary research and studying Canadian history.

Students will be presented with primary and secondary historical research and asked to determine why it is important to the study of history. They will compile notes in a lecture/discussion style fashion with teacher assistance.



Resources: Canada at the Turn of the Century: The Impact of Industrialization 1890s - 1920s website

Evaluation: Notebook Submission and presentation/discussion of primary or secondary evidence in class.

70 minutes

Lesson 2

Students will become introduced to their culminating task which will be due in lesson nine. During this lesson, the teacher will provide an in depth description of the assignment, what is expected, how it will be assessed. Students will then form their groups and are given a work period.



Resources: N/A
Evaluation: Final project using power point and costume to present research.
70 Minutes
Lesson 3
Students will describe the everyday life of various groups (i.e. First Nation peoples, Metis, Europeans) in Western Canada in the late nineteenth century. Specifically, students will locate relevant information about three major groups living in Rupert’s Land (Woodland Cree, Siksika, and the Metis) and use appropriate vocabulary.
Resources: Canada Revised 8 textbook
Evaluation: Observation sheet and anecdotal notes

70 minutes
Lesson 4
Students will describe the everyday life of various groups (i.e. First Nation peoples, Metis, Europeans) in Western Canada in the late nineteenth century. Specifically, students will locate relevant information about three major groups living in Rupert’s Land (Woodland Cree, Siksika, and the Metis) and use appropriate vocabulary.
Resources: Canada Revised 8 textbook
Evaluation: Metis worksheet
70 minutes
Lesson 5
Students will describe the causes and results of the Red River Settlement and explain the roles of key individuals and groups. In addition, students will also use appropriate vocabulary.
Resources: Canada Revised 8 textbook
Evaluation: Anecdotal records
70 minutes
Lesson 6
Students will research, analyze, and summarize the life and times of Louis Riel. Through a web quest students will look at his life and contributions to history. They will discover information about the Métis, Thomas Scott, and the Red River Rebellion. Based on their findings they will discuss whether Riel should be deemed a Canadian hero or traitor.
Resources: Youth Encyclopaedia of Canada website, historical minutes, and the Collections Canada Websites.
Evaluation: Students will complete a web quest.
70 minutes
Lesson 7
Students will identify, elaborate, and explain some of the factors that led to the settlement and expansion of the Canadian west including the role of the Canadian Pacific Railway. Students will design a poster to attract settlers to the west.
Resources: Collections Canada Websites
Evaluation: Rubric
70 Minutes
Lesson 8
Students are given the entire period to meet with their group to work on their culminating task. This lesson is to be used as a useful work period to ensure students have obtained the necessary resources and to pose any questions or clarifications they may have.
Resources: N/A
Evaluation: Observation
70 Minutes
Lesson 9
Students will present their final projects! Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the topics discussed within the unit, their technology skills, as well as their creativity through PowerPoint.
Resources: N/A
Evaluation: Rubric
70 Minutes




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