The American Revolution: Decision in North America Strategy & Tactics #270



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The American Revolution: Decision in North America

Strategy & Tactics #270
Contents

1.0 Introduction

2.0 Components

3.0 How to Win

4.0 Set Up

5.0 Sequence of Play

6.0 Political Points

7.0 Campaign Markers

8.0 Initiative

9.0 Rabble Rousing

10.0 Revolutionary Progress

11.0 Colonial Loyalty

12.0 European Balance of Power

13.0 Mobilizing Units

14.0 Campaigning

15.0 Stacking

16.0 Movement

17.0 Forced March

18.0 Combat

19.0 Supply

20.0 Enlistments

21.0 Leaders

22.0 Fog of War

23.0 Regional Movement Restrictions

24.0 Fleets

25.0 Off-Map Holding Boxes

26.0 French & Spanish Alliances

27.0 Hessian Units & Indian Units

Optional Rules



28.0 Fortresses & Sieges

29.0 Partisans

30.0 Indian Sovereignty

31.0 British Militia Upgrades

32.0 Interception

33.0 Militia Expeditions

34.0 Overrun

35.0 Frontier Warfare

36.0 Forage

37.0 Massacre

38.0 Honors of War

Credits
Design & Development: Joseph Miranda

Final Rules Editing: Ty Bomba

Playtesters: Ty Bomba,
Dr. Roger Mason, & Joseph Miranda

Map Graphics: Joe Youst

Counters: Larry Hoffman

Production: Callie Cummins & C.J. Doherty

Special Thanks: Javier Romero

© 2011 Decision Games


Bakersfield, CA.
Made & printed in the USA.
1.0 Introduction

1.1

The American Revolution: Decision in North America (AR), is a two-player wargame in which you command the Americans or the British in the War of American Independence, 1775-82. The objective of each player is to control the American colonies. The American player may also control French and Spanish units if those nations enter the war.
1.2 Scale

Each inch on the map equals 75 miles.


Each brigade-sized unit represents two to four battalions (about 1,500 to 4,000 men). Each game turn represents one year.
1.3 Charts & Tables

All this game’s charts and tables are printed on the mapsheet.


1.4 Optional Units

If not playing with those optional rules, set aside all fortress, siege and partisan markers and ignore all references to them in the following standard rules.


2.0 Components
2.1

The map shows the 13 American Colonies, Canada, the Caribbean, and adjoining regions as they were in the mid-18th century. The map uses a point-to-point movement system, which means units move from the locales (such as towns) to other points via the printed movement routes.



2.2 Towns

represent population centers, such as they were at the time. Each town has a political value, represented by a number. That’s the number of campaign markers a player collects if his forces occupy the town. Those political values are also used for determining who wins the game. Towns are also color-coded to show their political affiliation: dark blue for American, red for British, gray for neutral, light blue for French, and purple for Spanish.


2.3 Wilderness

areas contain little or no settlement, and they have no political value.


2.4 Indian

areas are locales that are centers of major tribes.


2.5 Ports

are towns that have an anchor symbol.


2.6 Routes

are the lines connecting points. A player may move his units from one point to another via routes. There are several types of routes: roads, trails, lakes and rivers, and High Seas


2.7 Political Divisions

The map is further divided into regions by political boundaries, including the following: New England, Mid-Atlantic, Virginia, the Deep South, the West, Florida, Canada, the West Indies (which also includes Jamaica and the Bahamas), New Spain, Cuba, Hispaniola. Political Divisions affect the mobilization and movement of militia as well as other aspects of play.


2.8 Off-Map Areas

These three holding boxes along the mapsheet’s eastern edge represent Britain, France and Spain.


2.9 Playing Pieces

The die-cut cardboard pieces are referred to as units, counters and unit-counters. Units are broken into two large categories: leaders and combat formations.


2.10 Leaders

Each has a leader value, which is a (parenthesized) number used to enhance the combat power of a force under a given leader’s command. There are three types of leaders: generals, militia commander (M), and admirals (anchor).



2.11 Combat Formations

come in the following types:


Regulars: brigade-sized formations.
Detachments: a battalion of regulars.
Fleets: ocean-going navies.
Grenadiers: a brigade of elite regulars.
Indian: warrior bands of the various tribes.

Light Troops: various mixes of rangers, dragoons and light infantry.


Militia: roughly a brigade of regionally raised and maintained forces.

2.12

Each of the unit types described above has a combat strength (see section 18.0), and a historic identification printed on it.


2.13 Unit Colors

Units are printed in the following background colors in order to identify their nationality and the side on which they fight:

Dark Blue: American Regulars (Continentals)

Light Blue: American Militia

Dark Red: British Regulars

Light Red: Tories (pro-British Militia)

Orange: Hessians (German Mercenaries)

White: French

Purple: Spanish

Green: Indian


2.14 Unit Abbreviations

The following abbreviations appear on the units:



American

Cont: Continental

Leg: Legion (combined cavalry-infantry)

Rif: Rifle

Sep: Separate Army

USMC: US Marine Corps



British

Dr: Dragoon

GD: Brigade of Guards

GR: Grenadier

Lt: Light Infantry

Hessian

Brunsw: Brunswick

Hesse: Hesse-Cassel & Hesse-Hanau

GS: Minor German states

Jaeger: Light Infantry

French

Agen: Agenois

Antil: Antilles

Bourb: Bourbonnois

CRIM: Corps Royal d’Infanterie de la Marine

CV: Chasseurs-Volontaires

LL: Lauzun’s Legion

Soiss: Soissonois

Tour: Touraine

WG: Wild Geese (Irish Mercenaries)



Spanish

CM: Cuerpo de Battallones de Marina

Fusil: Fusileros (Rifles)

Habn: Habana

Guadal: Guadalajara

Luisn: Louisiana


2.15 Markers

are used to signify various things.


Fortress: represent improved defenses and supply depots (see section 28.0).
Massacre: see section 38.0
Partisans: come in two types, Rebels (American) and Tories (pro-British).

Siege: siege guns and trenches used to attack fortresses (see section 28.0).




3.0 How to Win
3.1 Sudden Death Victory

Play stops and you win the game if, during any Victory Check Phase of any turn (see 5.1), you are found to have accomplished both of the following (1 and either 2a or 2b):

1) Military Victory: your units occupy towns whose total political values equal 36 or more.

2a) American Political Victory: the American player has attained the Articles of the Confederation level on the Revolutionary Progress Table, and he also has a loyalty level of two or more in any four of the seven colonial regions listed below 2b.

2b) British Political Victory:
the Revolutionary Progress Table is at Continental Congress or lower, and he also has a loyalty level of two or higher of any four of the following seven colonial regions: New England, the Middle Atlantic, Virginia, the Deep South, the West, Florida, Canada.
3.2

If either player gains a sudden death victory, the game ends at the time of that turn’s Victory Check Phase. Note, that means if the American player gets to the Declaration of Independence on the Revolutionary Progress Table, the British player will thereafter be unable to achieve a sudden death victory.


3.3 Partial Victory

If neither player has attained a sudden death victory by the end of the last game turn, either player can claim a partial victory if he’s achieved his side’s political or military victory condition while the other player has achieved neither.


3.4 Draw

If both players have achieved a political or military victory, or neither player has achieved either one, that game ends in a draw.


3.5 Shorter Scenario

To play a shorter game, set up as given below in section 4.0 and start play as in the full-length game. Now, though, play ends and victory is reckoned at the end of the 1778 game turn. At that time, the American player is declared the winner if he’s accomplished all three of the following: 1) he has the loyalty, to any degree, of four or more colonial regions; 2) on the Revolutionary Progress Table, the marker is in the Declaration of Independence space or higher; and 3) on the European Balance of Power table, the marker is in the French Alliance space or higher. The British player wins if the American player fails to meet or surpass all three of those victory conditions.


4.0 Set Up
4.1 Campaign Markers

Place all Campaign markers in a large-mouth opaque containing, such as a coffee mug or cereal bowl. That container and its contents are hereafter referred to as the pool.


4.2 British Set Up

The British player sets up his side’s forces first, according to the following list:

Boston: Leader Gage; 3 x Regulars, 1 x Light, 1 x Fleet, 1 x Fortress

Quebec & Halifax: 1 x Fortress in each

Canada: Leader Carleton, 1 x Regular, 2 x Militia

Ticonderoga: 1 x Detachment, 1 x Fortress

New York: 1 x Detachment

Yorktown: 1 x Militia

Camden or Charlotte: 1 x Militia

Detroit: Leader Hamilton, 1 x Detachment

Florida: 2 x Detachments, 1 x Militia

Caribbean: 3 x Detachments (one each in Bahamas, West Indies & Jamaica)

Starting Campaign Markers: none

Britain Off-Map Holding Box:


Leaders Clinton, W. Howe & R. Howe, 2 x Regulars, 1 x Light, 1 x Fleet

Other than Cornwallis, all remaining British leaders go in the pool.


4.3 American Set Up

The American player sets up his side’s forces second, according to the following list. American units may not be placed in the same locales as British units:


New England: Leader Ward, 5 x Militia

Mid-Atlantic:


Leaders Arnold & Allen, 3 x Militia

Virginia: 3 x Militia

Deep South: 2 x Militia

Boonesboro: 1 x Militia

Boston & Richmond: 1 x Partisan in each

Starting Campaign Markers:


six drawn at random from the pool.

Other than Washington, all remaining American leaders go in the pool.


4.4 French Set Up

Initially neutral, these units are set up by the American player:

Hispaniola: 1 Regular, 1 x Fortress

France Off-Map Holding Box:


Leaders Rochambeau & d’Grasse, 5 x Regulars, 1 x Marine, 2 x Fleets
4.5 Spanish Set Up

Initially neutral, these units are set up by the American player:

New Orleans: Leader Galvez, 1 x Regular, 1 x Militia

Louisville: 1 x Militia

Havana: 1 x Regular, 1 x Militia, 1 x Fleet, 1 x Fortress

Santiago: 1 x Militia

Spain Off-Map Holding Box:
3 x Regulars, 1 x Marine
4.6 Rabble Rousing Tables

Place the markers for those three tables in boxes indicated on each one, and see sections 9.0 through 12.0 for more details.


4.7 Turn One Initiative

The American player automatically has the initiative on Turn 1.



4.8 British Turn 1 Mobilization

On Turn 1, the British player pays twice the normal mobilization costs for units and Campaign markers.


4.9 British Special Reinforcements

Set aside the following units:

Leader Cornwallis, 1 x Grenadier, 6 x Regulars, 1 x Light, 1 x Marine, 1x Fleet. The instant that the Declaration of Independence goes into effect on the Revolutionary Progress Table, the British receive those units, in the Britain Off-Map Holding Box, at no cost. Note that means their arrival will take place during a Rabble Rousing Phase rather than a Mobilization Phase. Those units may not be otherwise recruited, though they may be replaced normally if eliminated.
4.10 American Special Reinforcements

Set aside the American leader Washington. The instant the Revolutionary Progress Table reaches Continental Congress, the American player places him with any American unit anywhere on the map. Washington may not otherwise be recruited.


4.11

All units not listed above are available as reinforcements.


5.0 Sequence of Play
5.1

Each game turn consists of one run-through of the following sequence of play:


I. Initiative Phase

Determine who will be the first player for this turn.


II. Political Phase

A. The First Player collects political points for the towns he occupies.

B. The Second Player collects political points for the towns he occupies.
III. Mobilization Phase

A. The First Player expends political points to purchase campaign markers and build units.

B. The Second Player expends political points to purchase campaign markers and build units.
IV. Rabble Rousing Phase.

Both players commit Rabble Rousing markers to the three Rabble Rousing Tables in order to influence American Revolutionary Progress, Colonial Loyalty and the European Balance of Power.



V. Campaign Phases

A. First Campaign Phase

1. First Player First Movement Phase.

The First Player moves any of his units he desires.

2. First Player First Combat Phase.
The First player launches attacks.

3. Second Player First Movement Phase.


The Second Player moves any of his units he desires.

4. Second Player First Combat Phase.

The Second Player launches attacks.

B. Second Campaign Phase

1. First Player Second Movement Phase.
The First Player moves forces via forced march.

2. First Player Second Combat Phase.


The First Player launches attacks resulting from his forced marches.

3. Second Player Second Movement Phase


The Second Player moves via forced march.

4. Second Player Second Combat Phase.


The Second Player launches attacks resulting his forced marches.

C. Third Campaign Phase

1. First Player Third Movement Phase.
The First Player moves forces via forced march.

2. First Player Third Combat Phase.


The First Player launches attacks resulting from his forced marches.

3. Second Player Third Movement Phase.


The Second Player moves via forced march.

4. Second Player Third Combat Phase.


The Second Player launches attacks resulting his forced marches.
VI. Supply Phase

A. Forage Phase

1. The First Player checks his units for supply and attrits those that are out of supply.

2. The Second Player checks his units for supply and attrits those that are out of supply.

B. Enlistment Phase.

1. The First Player checks to see if any of his units’ enlistments have expired.

2. The Second Player checks to see if any of his units’ enlistments have expired.

C. Point & Marker Adjustment Phase

1. Both players zero-out any remaining political points.

2. Both players return half of the campaign markers in their hands to the pool.


VII. End of Turn Phase

A. Victory Check.


Check for a sudden death victory.

B. Turn Advancement.


Move the turn marker one space ahead. If it’s the last turn, the game ends. Determine the victor.

6.0 Political Points
6.1

Political points work as currency during play in that they’re expended to mobilize units and/or buy campaign markers. Political points are openly recorded by both players using pencil and paper.


6.2

During each game turn’s Political Phase, both players total the number of political points of towns his forces occupy.


6.3 Occupation

You must have at least one friendly combat unit in a locale to gain its political points.


6.4 Partisans

If there is an enemy partisan (Rebel or Tory) unit in a town, you may not collect the political points for that locale no matter what units you may have there. Friendly partisan units by themselves don’t enable you to collect political points for a locale.


6.5

Zero-value locales never provide any political points to either side.


6.6 Off-Map Area Holding Boxes

You don’t need to occupy the Britain, France or Spain boxes to gain their points. The British player always gets the points for Britain. The American player gets the France and Spain points if/when those powers become belligerents. A player who controls an off-map area rolls the designated number of dice each Political Phase and receives that number of political points for it/them. While France or Spain is/are neutral, no points are received for their off-map holding boxes or for areas their units occupy on the map-proper.


6.7 American Revolutionary Progress

This table designates the number of die rolls the American player makes to generate his political points. If the table is at Declaration of Independence or higher, the British player also rolls an extra die each turn Britain receives that number of additional political points.


6.8 No accumulation

Political points must be used in the turn they’re received; they may not be accumulated from turn to turn.


7.0 Campaign Markers
7.1

Whenever you’re allowed to do so, randomly pick campaign markers from the pool. Randomly means without looking to see what you’ve picked until after you’ve picked. Such picks will occur at the following times:

1) During the Political Phase, you may purchase the right to randomly pick campaign markers at the cost listed on the Mobilization Table.

2) If you win a battle, pick campaign markers equal to the number indicated in rule 18.11.


7.2

During the Supply Phase, you must return to the pool 50 percent of the campaign markers you have in your hand to the pool. Round down all remainders. For example, if you have five markers in your hand, you would have to return two. You deliberately choose which markers you will return.


7.3

Beyond the return requirement described above, there’s no limit on the number of campaign markers you may hold in your hand. If the pool is empty, no more markers can be picked until some are returned to the pool. Also note that neither player may ever purchase more than 15 markers during any one Political Phase.


7.4

You may always examine the campaign markers you have in your possession, once you’ve picked them. The opposing player may not examine the campaign markers in your hand unless he plays a campaign marker allowing for spying.


7.5 Using Campaign Markers

Campaign markers are expended in order to allow for certain game functions. The explanations are below. Each explanation gives the name of the marker, and when and for what it can be used. Unless specifically prohibited in its explanation, a marker may be used in the same phase it was acquired.



7.6 Types of Markers

There are three broad categories of campaign markers.


Action markers are used to initiate the actions listed in their specific explanations.
Rabble Rousing markers are used to shift the American Revolutionary Progress, European Balance of Power and Colony Loyalty Tracks.
Tactics markers are used to conduct forced march and to enhance your units’ combat power.

7.7

Unless otherwise stated, a campaign marker is returned to the pool as soon as it’s played (expended). If a marker’s explanation says it may be used (expended) only once per game, set it aside when that first play of it is made.


7.8

Certain markers may be played only by one player. If the other player picks it, he may hold it indefinitely in order to keep it out of play, but it does count toward the return requirement described above in rule 7.2.


Design Note. The spare campaign marker is only included for use in possible future variants. Similarly, if you’re not using an optional rule to which a marker refers, set aside that marker at the start of play.
7.9 Action Markers

have the following explanations:


Bait the Redcoats/Bluecoats: play during any friendly Movement Phase. Indicate any locale that has a friendly partisan unit and any enemy combat units. Roll a die. 1 = the enemy rolls a die and picks that number of campaign markers; 2-3= the enemy player immediately executes a massacre in this space; 4 = no effect; 5-6 = you roll a die and pick that number of campaign markers.
Committee of Correspondence: Play in one of two ways: 1) during a 2nd or 3rd Movement Phase: you may initiate a forced march with any one friendly force, regardless if it has a leader and without the need of expending a military marker; or 2) during any phase to place a friendly partisan at no cost in any colonial region that’s pro your side. Normal rules of placement must otherwise be followed, and you must still roll for the marker (see the Mobilization Table, 28.1).
Debate in Parliament. Play during the Political Phase. If the British player plays it, he rolls an extra die for political points this turn. If the American plays it, the British roll one less die for political points this turn
Drillmaster. Play during any Mobilization Phase. Indicate any one locale containing a friendly leader. American: recruit a number of regulars in that locale, up to the leader’s leadership value, at a cost of two political points each. British: remove a militia unit from the designated leader’s locale and replace it with a regular or light unit at no cost.
Engineers. Play at the end of any of your Movement Phases. Place a Fortress or Siege marker atop any friendly combat unit of any type at no cost.
Hessians. British: play during any Mobilization Phase to recruit a Hessian unit at no cost in the Britain Off-Map Holding Box. American: play during any Mobilization Phase to prevent all British recruiting of Hessian units this turn.
Indians. British: play during any Mobilization Phase to recruit an Indian unit at no cost in any one Indian locale. American: play during any Political Phase to pick one campaign marker, at no cost, for any Indian unit then anywhere on the map.
Leader Arises. Play during any Mobilization Phase atop any friendly combat unit. Treat the marker as a leader with a leadership value of one. You may use this leader as a general or admiral. During the same turn’s Enlistments Phase, you must return this marker to the pool.
Master Plan. Play at any time other than during a combat resolution. You may re-roll any die roll you make, but you must accept that second roll.
Minutemen. Play at the start of any of your Movement Phases. You may immediately mobilize a militia unit, at no cost, in any one town or wilderness locale in a Colonial region that’s pro your side. The chosen locale may not contain an enemy combat unit or partisan.
Mutiny & Treason. Play at the start of any Point & Marker Adjustment Phase. Roll a die. The opposing player randomly picks that number of campaign markers in his hand and returns them to the pool. (Those extra returns don’t let him escape from the normal requirements of rule 7.2.) You must then give this marker to your opponent. This marker may be instantly negated by the opposing player’s immediate counter-play of a Spy marker, in which case this marker and the Spy marker are returned to the pool without further effect.
Politicking Among Generals. Play during the end of turn phase. Name one enemy leader then in play, other than Washington, and roll a die. Results are: 1 = that leader is permanently removed from play; 2-3 = return him to the leader pool; 4-6 = no effect.
Privateers. Play during any enemy Movement Phase as your opponent is starting a naval move. That naval move is stalled in its place of origin. Also, any land units transported by that blocked naval move may not conduct any other movement that turn.
Pulaski. Only the American may play this. Play during any Mobilization Phase. Receive one regular or light unit, at no cost, in any locale containing a friendly leader.
Shot Heard Round the World. Only the American player may play this. Play after any battle in order to gain twice the campaign markers you would normally gain for that battle. Permanently remove this marker from play when it’s played.
Speculators. Play during any Political Phase. Roll a die: 1-2 = roll another die and randomly return to the pool that number of campaign markers from your hand; 3-6 = roll another die and randomly pick that number of campaign markers at no cost.
(continues)

Spy. You at any time choose to do one of the following: 1) examine all enemy units in one colonial region or off-map box; or 2) examine all campaign markers in your opponent’s hand. Alternatively, you may play it immediately upon your opponent’s enemy of a Spy or Mutiny & Treason marker to negate that play.


Tarleton’s Quarter: Play at the start of any battle to add +1 to your initiative die roll, but if you win the battle the enemy gains twice the number of campaign markers he would normally receive. If using the optional Massacre rule, instead of the enemy gaining extra campaign markers, you must conduct a massacre if you win the battle. This may not be played in a locale where there previously was a massacre.
7.10 Rabble Rousing Markers

have values of one or three, and they’re used in the Rabble Rousing Phase. If the British player picks the Adams, Franklin, Jefferson or Paine markers, they have a rabble rousing value of one. If the American player picks them, they have a rabble rousing value of three. See section 9.0 for more details


7.11 Tactics Markers

may be used as follows.



Forced March:

1) play at the start of any friendly 2nd or 3rd Movement Phase to initiate a forced march with one friendly force that has a leader with it; or 2) play during any enemy Movement Phase to conduct an optional Interception.



Combat:

See rule 18.4.



8.0 Initiative

8.1

During each game turn’s Initiative Phase, determine which player will be the First Player for that turn. Both players secretly and simultaneously commit any number of campaign markers of any types (by covering them with one hand on the table next to the map). Then both reveal the number he committed. The player whose total number of markers is higher wins the initiative. Both players then place their committed markers into the pool.


8.2

If both players commit no markers, or if they commit the same number of markers, roll a die and the higher-scoring player has the initiative. In the case of die-roll resolved draws, the committed markers of both players still go into the pool.


9.0 Rabble Rousing
9.1

Rabble Rousing markers may be used for the following:

1) They may be used by the American player to cause the marker on the American Revolutionary Progress Table to move rightward on that table (see section 10.0).

2) They may be used by both players to change colonial regions’ loyalties (see section 11.0).

3) They may be used by both players to change the European Balance of Power (see section 12.0).

4) They may be used by both players to place Rebel and Tory partisan markers (see section 29.0).


9.2

Rabble Rousing markers have numeric values printed on them of one or more. Those numbers are the number of rabble rousing points each marker is worth. Some markers are worth more for the Americans than for the British. For example, Benjamin Franklin is worth three points for the American player and one point for the British player.


9.3 Procedure

During each Rabble Rousing Phase both players secretly commit (in writing) the number of Rabble Rousing markers from their hand that they want to use on each of the of Rabble Rousing Tables (American Revolutionary Progress, Colonial Loyalty, European Balance of Power). You may commit any number of Rabble Rousing markers to each table, from zero to all such markers presently in your hand.

You need not commit markers to any or every table. That done, both players simultaneously reveal their own marker commitments. That turn’s First Player chooses which of the three tables will be consulted first. For each table, add up the number of Rabble Rousing points you’ve committed to it. Then roll a die and add that number to your total. The player who rolls higher wins on that table. In the event of ties, neither player wins. The outcomes of winning on a table is described in the following three rules sections. All committed Rabble Rousing markers are then returned to the pool.
9.4

If you commit no Rabble Rousing markers to a particular table, you may not roll a die for it. If the other player committed one or more markers to that table, he automatically wins there. If neither player commits any Rabble Rousing markers to a table(s), then neither player rolls and nothing happens on the table(s).


10.0 Revolutionary Progress
10.1

The Revolutionary Progress Table shows the status of the revolution. Place the marker in the Don’t Tread on Me box at the start of play.


10.2 American Rabble Rousing Victory

If the American player wins the procedure for this table as described in rule 9.3, immediately move the Revolutionary Progress marker one space right on the table.


10.3 British Rabble Rousing Victory or Tie

If either of these are the outcome for this table, the marker simply stays in place.


10.4

Note that revolutionary progress is never reversed. Further note that, once the index reaches Articles of Confederation, it can move no higher.


10.5 Effects

The effect of each level of revolutionary progress is given on the table. Those effects are all cumulative except for the number of die rolls made by the American player for political points. For example, if the Articles of Confederation level is reached, implement every effect given on the table, but the American player would roll on four dice when generating his political points (not a cumulative 13).



11.0 Colonial Loyalty

11.1

The Colonial Loyalty Table shows the status of each British colonial region’s loyalty to either the American or British cause. To start, place each colony’s loyalty marker as indicated on the table. When going through the process described in rule 9.3, you make a separate commitment of political points, and rabble rousing resolution, for each colonial region.


11.2 American Rabble Rousing Victory

Shift that colonial region’s marker one space in favor of the American cause (rightward).


11.3 British Rabble Rousing Victory

Shift that colonial region’s marker one space in favor of the British cause (leftward).


11.4 Rabble Rousing Tie

Leave that colonial region’s marker in place.


11.5

Every colony’s loyalty marker may shift any number of times in either direction over the course of a game. If a given colony’s marker reaches the maximum, it may move no higher; however, it might go lower.

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