Th Grade Ancient Civilizations Course Guidelines Essential Question for course



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2013-2014 7th Grade Ancient Civilizations Course Guidelines

Essential Question for course:

Why does History keep repeating itself?

Why don’t human beings learn from their mistakes?

Is it true that those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it?

To what extent does Geography play an important part in history all the way to present day?
Instructor: Mr. Daniel C. Yenshaw

Room: 230

School Year: 2013-2014

Email: dyenshaw@aisegypt.com

Course: 7th Grade Ancient Civilizations

Textbook: World History-Patterns of Interaction(McDougal Littell)-This book will be a .pdf book which your child will have on their laptop or computer and needs to be brought every day. I am trying to stay away from heavy and useless text books. If for some reason your son/daughter does not have a laptop or tablet, please email me and ill make necessary arrangements.

Welcome Message:

Welcome to 7th Grade History. This year we will be covering Ancient Man all the way to approximately the Dark Ages in Europe in 1000 AD. I am excited to take your son/daughter on this exciting ride through history and hope they will enjoy and respect what they will learn in my class. This is my second year at AIS, as last year I was some of your child’s PE teacher. Before AIS I worked for three years at an International School in Venezuela where I taught 7th Grade Geography, 8th Grade American History, 9th Grade Ancient Civilizations, 10th Grade Modern World History, and 11th Grade Fitness. Before that I taught culture at a Japanese High School and also taught four years in El Paso, Texas where I taught, English, Texas History, DRD (developmental reading disorders) and also a class for struggling readers to help them pass the State Mandated Test. I will bring a great deal of knowledge to the class room from travels as I have been to 67 countries in my life and often use life experiences and pictures to bring this history to the students. I am very excited to start this year and move along with our incredible journey as I hope your son or daughter is also. Please feel free to contact me at the above email if you ever have any questions or concerns about anything.



Class Rules(Simple Version)

1. The More you complain, the less sympathy I give

2. Tardiness is not an option

3. Use the restroom before class

4. Late assignments will have consequences

5. Good behavior is a must in order to learn

6. Chewing Gum in class is a NO NO.

7. If you are absent, it is your responsibility to get assignment(s)

8. Water is ok in the class. Other drinks and food not permitted unless told otherwise

9. Clean up after yourself when you leave class

10. No gossiping or bad mouthing other people

12. Look Sharp, Stay in School Uniform

13. Do not pack up from class early. I dismiss you all, not the bell.

Assignments:

Assessments-40%

Projects or Essay (Group, Individual, or Paper)-30%

Agenda/Journals- 10%

Homework-10%

Quizzes- 10%-Usually Primary Source document quizzes or Sectional Quizzes.



  • ENGRADE: Students grades will be updated on www.engrade.com every couple of weeks. Information on how to register will be given within the first two weeks of term one.

  • Late Assignments: Students should no that late work will be no tolerated in class. They will be given one pass that their parents have to sign, understanding the assignment was late, then they will be given 25% off the assignment. When they use this pass up, they will not get a chance to get it until the next quarter begins, which means they will receive a 0 for all additional assignments turned in late

Class Materials:

  1. Journal Spiral Notebook with lined paper

  2. Lined Paper for taking notes, quizzes, etc.

  3. Blue or Black Pens or a Pencil (tests or assignments will not be done in marker or highlighter.

  4. Laptop Computer or IPAD for notes and for book-I am instituting a system which worked in my previous school. In order to save paper and money for the school, I have a digital book that we will use. It is the students responsibility to bring the computer/Ipad/ Tablet, every single day. If the student does not own one of these, please let me know on the first week of school so I may make arrangements to get them a copy of the book from the copy room.

  5. English Language Dictionary

  6. Agenday/Planner

Assessments:

I will be doing a number of Assessments this year which will include the following: Exams, Group and Individual Projects, Various Essays, Quizzes, and Independent Studies. I believe that each and every student has different strengths and by designing these different assessments it will help draw student’s strengths from different areas.



Integrated Unit

An integrated unit will be developed for implementation during the first week(s) of semester 2. Teachers will be given time to plan together as we work to connect all core and specialist subjects together into one unit of instruction. Content, project(s), common vocabulary, written responses – all must be put together in order to integrate our curriculum to the fullest extent. While this year the goal is one unit, the plan is to create 4 integrated units to be used throughout the year. This will all culminate with our trip to Greece.



Course Description:

In seventh grade social studies, students explore the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from ancient times through the beginnings of the modern world. A grade seven student surveys early human history, and civilizations, the impact of farming, the development of cities, city-states, and kingdoms. Students in grade seven expand their understanding of history by studying the people and event that ushered in the dawn of the major Western and non-Western ancient civilizations. Specific areas of focus include ancient Egypt, ancient China, Harappa, Indus River Valley, Mesopotamia, Phoenicia, Minoan-Mycenae, Greece, Rome, the Byzantine Empire, and the rise of the Islamic Civilization.



Internationalism in Ancient Civilizations

Throughout the course of the school year the concept of becoming a global citizen will be emphasized. To become a global citizen, students will learn about the impact different cultures had shaping the world into what it is today. Students will study the accomplishments of Sumer, Babylon, Assyrians, Egyptians, Persians, Macedonians, Greeks, Romans, Byzantine, Indus River Valley, and ancient China to discover what impact each civilization had on their moment in time and future generations. Along with studying the contributions of each civilization, students will learn about how civilizations interacted with each other, positively or negatively, to create historical parallels with the ancient world and modern society. Linking the accomplishments of ancient civilizations found all over the world and modern society will give students a better understanding of different cultures, which in turn will give students a better global perspective.



Course Curriculum and Term-by-Term Breakdown of Content

World History and Geography to 1000 CE


TERMS ONE, TWO, THREE AND FOUR

These standards will enable students to explore the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from ancient times until 1500 a.d. (c.e.) in terms of the impact on Western civilization.

The study of history rests on knowledge of dates, names, places, events, and ideas. Historical understanding, however, requires students to engage in historical thinking, raise questions, and marshal evidence in support of their answers. Students engaged in historical thinking draw upon chronological thinking, historical comprehension, historical analysis and interpretation, historical research, and decision making. These skills are developed through the study of significant historical substance from the era or society being studied.

WHI.1 The student will improve skills in historical research and geographical analysis by

a) identifying, analyzing, and interpreting primary and secondary sources to make generalizations about events and life in world history to 1500 a.d. (c.e.);

b) using maps, globes, artifacts, and pictures to analyze the physical and cultural landscapes of the world and interpret the past to 1500 a.d. (c.e.);

c) identifying major geographic features important to the study of world history to 1500 a.d. (c.e.);

d) identifying and comparing political boundaries with the locations of civilizations, empires, and kingdoms from 4000 b.c. (b.c.e.) to 1500 a.d. (c.e.);

e) analyzing trends in human migration and cultural interaction from prehistory to 1500 a.d. (c.e.);

f) analyzing the impact of economic forces, including taxation, government spending, trade, resources, and monetary systems, on events to 1500 a.d. (c.e.).


TERM ONE

Era I: Human Origins and Early Civilizations, Prehistory to 1000 b.c. (b.c.e.)


WHI.2 The student will demonstrate knowledge of early development of humankind from the Paleolithic Era to the agricultural revolution by

a) explaining the impact of geographic environment on hunter-gatherer societies;

b) listing characteristics of hunter-gatherer societies, including their use of tools and fire;

c) describing technological and social advancements that gave rise to stable communities;

d) explaining how archaeological discoveries are changing present-day knowledge of early peoples.

WHI.3 The student will demonstrate knowledge of ancient river valley civilizations, including those of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus River Valley, and China and the civilizations of the Hebrews, Phoenicians, and Nubians, by

a) locating these civilizations in time and place;

b) describing the development of social, political, and economic patterns, including slavery;

c) explaining the development of religious traditions;

d) describing the origins, beliefs, traditions, customs, and spread of Judaism;

e) explaining the development of language and writing.


Era II: Classical Civilizations and Rise of Religious Traditions, 1000 b.c. (b.c.e.) to 500 a.d. (c.e.)



TERM TWO

WHI.4 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the civilizations of Persia, India, and China in terms of chronology, geography, social structures, government, economy, religion, and contributions to later civilizations by

a) describing Persia, including Zoroastrianism and the development of an imperial bureaucracy;

b) describing India, with emphasis on the Aryan migrations and the caste system;

c) describing the origins, beliefs, traditions, customs, and spread of Hinduism;

d) describing the origins, beliefs, traditions, customs, and spread of Buddhism;

e) describing China, with emphasis on the development of an empire and the construction of the Great Wall;

f) describing the impact of Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism.

WHI.5 The student will demonstrate knowledge of ancient Greece in terms of its impact on Western civilization by

a) assessing the influence of geography on Greek economic, social, and political development, including the impact of Greek commerce and colonies;

b) describing Greek mythology and religion;

c) identifying the social structure and role of slavery, explaining the significance of citizenship and the development of democracy, and comparing the city-states of Athens and Sparta;

d) evaluating the significance of the Persian and Peloponnesian wars;

e) characterizing life in Athens during the Golden Age of Pericles;

f) citing contributions in drama, poetry, history, sculpture, architecture, science, mathematics, and philosophy, with emphasis on Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle;

g) explaining the conquest of Greece by Macedonia and the formation and spread of Hellenistic culture by Alexander the Great.


TERM THREE

WHI.6 The student will demonstrate knowledge of ancient Rome from about 700 b.c. (b.c.e.) to 500 a.d. (c.e.) in terms of its impact on Western civilization by

a) assessing the influence of geography on Roman economic, social, and political development;

b) describing Roman mythology and religion;

c) explaining the social structure and role of slavery, significance of citizenship, and the development of democratic features in the government of the Roman Republic;

d) sequencing events leading to Roman military domination of the Mediterranean basin and Western Europe and the spread of Roman culture in these areas;

e) assessing the impact of military conquests on the army, economy, and social structure of Rome;

f) assessing the roles of Julius and Augustus Caesar in the collapse of the Republic and the rise of imperial monarchs;

g) explaining the economic, social, and political impact of the Pax Romana;

h) describing the origin, beliefs, traditions, customs, and spread of Christianity;

i) explaining the development and significance of the Church in the late Roman Empire;

j) listing contributions in art and architecture, technology and science, medicine, literature and history, language, religious institutions, and law;

k) citing the reasons for the decline and fall of the Western Roman Empire.

Era III: Postclassical Civilizations, 300 to 1000 a.d. (c.e.)


WHI.7 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the Byzantine Empire and Russia from about 300 to 1000 a.d. (c.e.) by

a) explaining the establishment of Constantinople as the capital of the Eastern Roman Empire;

b) identifying Justinian and his contributions, including the codification of Roman law, and describing the expansion of the Byzantine Empire and economy;

c) characterizing Byzantine art and architecture and the preservation of Greek and Roman traditions;

d) explaining disputes that led to the split between the Roman Catholic Church and the Greek Orthodox Church;

e) mapping and assessing the impact of Byzantine influence and trade on Russia and Eastern

Europe.
TERM FOUR

WHI.8 The student will demonstrate knowledge of Islamic civilization from about 600 to 1000 a.d. (c.e.) by

a) describing the origin, beliefs, traditions, customs, and spread of Islam;

b) assessing the influence of geography on Islamic economic, social, and political development, including the impact of conquest and trade;

c) identifying historical turning points that affected the spread and influence of Islamic civilization, with emphasis on the Sunni-Shi’a division and the Battle of Tours;

d) citing cultural and scientific contributions and achievements of Islamic civilization.

WHI.9 The student will demonstrate knowledge of Western Europe during the Middle Ages from about 500 to 1000 a.d. (c.e.) in terms of its impact on Western civilization by

a) sequencing events related to the spread and influence of Christianity and the Catholic Church throughout Europe;

b) explaining the structure of feudal society and its economic, social, and political effects;

c) explaining the rise of Frankish kings, the Age of Charlemagne, and the revival of the idea of the Roman Empire;

d) sequencing events related to the invasions, settlements, and influence of migratory groups, including Angles, Saxons, Magyars, and Vikings.

Overnight Field Trip-Greece

I will be passing out information for the field trip to Greece during the first week of school. We have planned an exciting time to this great country with so many tie ins with our curriculum. We have worked hard to line it up with every class. Payments will be done through the year. Please do not let your son/daughter miss this great opportunity to see HISTORY ALIVE!!!!



Class Point System

Thematic Emphasis
Our focus on above content will center on the following themes: Trade, Culture, Religion, Ethnicity, Technology, Development, Government, War, Spread, Geography, and Transportation. Within all units, these themes will be examined and used to extract information which will integrate and connect the units and time periods.
Rubrics:

I will be using three different rubrics for Assessments.
The first one is a group or individual project presentation rubric
Grading Breakdown Rubric

10 8 5 2 0



Speaking Effectively and Method of Delivery

Is very enthusiastic about delivering this Presentation. Each group member speaks loud when presenting and everyone is able to understand them. Stands up strait, relaxed, and makes eye contact with people, all group members are circulating about the room at one time or another

Is somewhat enthusiastic about delivering the Presentation. One of the group members does not speak loud enough. One e of the group members are slouching and not making eye contact

Is not very enthusiastic about presentation with one or more of the group members not speaking loud enough and one or more of the group members not making eye contact with people while presenting

Is clearly not making much of an attempt to present or know material. Often confusing as group members are not speaking loud enough and are not making eye contact

Speaking and/or method of delivery is not understandable or was not present in the presentation

Accuracy of Outline with Key Concepts being presented

Outline is informative and key concepts in the chapter were presented very well. And able to answer my questions and other peoples questions

Outline is somewhat informative and key concepts in the chapter were presented, but missing some key content. Able to answer most questions

Outline is missing info and key concepts in the chapter were not presented which may of confused people. Had trouble answering some questions

Outline is incomplete. Key Concepts were not discussed and people will have a hard time using this on the quiz. And questions are not answered

There is no evidence of outline or the outline is almost incomplete

Internet Source

Great Source that involves the reader , and gives a good account of what was going on at the time. Also is very interesting to the class

Good Source that somewhat involves the reader, and a descent account of what was going on at the time.

Descent Source, but not a good representation of the time. Readers are somewhat confused

Source has no relevancy to what is going on with the time period and confuses the reader

Internet Source was not present for the presentation

Effectiveness of Powerpoint or Activity in students learning the information

Information was well presented with the students. Information was clear and accurate and the medium was very good. Pictures are present for visual stimulation in all of the slides. Use of maps is evident in presentation

Information was well presented but may have had some gaps. Students understood some of the information. Medium was good. Pictures are missing in 1-3 slides. Use of maps is evident

Information was presented sub par. Group members had problems relaying information to rest of class. Medium was somewhat effective. Pictures are present in less than half the slides. Use of maps is evident

Information was not presented well. Students were confused with information and medium was not effective. Pictures are present in less than a quarter of the slides. Use of maps is evident/

No Powerpoint or activity was present for the presentation and/or no pictures were present

Group Behavior

Group was perfect on the days while working on the presentation. All group members was also perfect and listened to all presentations

Group was well behaved while working on the presentation, one or more incident of misbehavior happened. And/or listened to presentations, but one or more group member was rude

Group was often loud and disruptive while working on the presentation, but still worked. During the presentations there was a lot of talking with one or more of group members

Group did not have good behavior while working on the project. One or more of the people was often rude while others were presenting

Group overall was very disruptive while work on presentations and had three or more warnings combined while people were presenting

Individual Behavior

Member worked with group well and collaboration was going on while working on the projects and presentations

Group member was pretty well behaved but had to be warned once during projects/presentations, but showed collaboration

Group member did not have good behavior at least one time during working on projects and presentations

Two warnings while working on projects and while people were presenting

Had to be warned more than two times during projects/presentations and did not show a willingness to collaborate

Time (all components have to be met in order to get full credit)

45 mins to 1 hour and preptime was 10-15 minutes

+/− 3 minutes for allotted presentation time and +/− 3 minutes for preptime

+/− 5 minutes allotted for presentation time and +/− 5 minutes for preptime

+/− 10 minutes allotted for presentation time and +/− 10 minutes for preptime

Time limits not followed and clearly showed lack of planning

Words per slide (if ppt is used)

30 words or less on all slides and slide show does not have any paragraphs (info should be summarized by presenters)

30 words or less on ¾ to 9/10 of the slides and/or slide show does not have paragraphs

30 words or less on more than ½ of the slides and/or slide show does not have any paragraphs

30 words or less on less than half of the slides and used some paragraphs

None of the preceding criteria was followed

Music/Video/animation/ Sound

Clearly 3 pieces of Music/Video/animation/sound is used and clearly engages the audience

2 pieces of Music/Video/animation/sound is used and engages the audience

2 pieces of Music/Video/animation/sound is used but is not relevant to presentation

1 piece of Music/Video/animation/sound is used and does not engage the audience and is not relevant

None of the preceding criteria was followed

Essential Question

Essential Question is Evident, Well explained in PPT, and answer is given at the end

Essential Question is mentioned, does not go into detail, but answers it

Missing two pieces of Essential Question Criteria, but may talk about it

Essential Question is stated, but not answered at all

No Essential Question



The next two are papers that the students will have to do. Either compare and contrast or Analysis of something are the main topics I use.
Content/Knowledge

5 (A)    The information presented relate to the text & goes beyond what is being asked by the assignment. The writer makes relevant text to self connections beyond what is required. In-depth knowledge of the subject matter is clear.

4 (B)    The information presented is thorough and relevant to the assignment. It relates to the text and some text to self connections may have been made. The writers meaning is clear and their knowledge of the subject matter is evident.

3 (C)    The information presented is adequate and has some relevance to the assignment. There are some unexplained/undeveloped points. The writer shows some knowledge of the subject matter.

2 (D)  The information presented is minimal and/or not necessarily relevant to the assignment. The connections to the assignment are random and/or generally unexplained.

1 (F)   The information presented is weak. The relevance to the assigned task is unclear at some points in the writing.

0 (F)    The information presented has no relevance to the assignment.
 

Organization:  Includes introduction, paragraphs in the body organized around the information and a conclusion.

3 (A)    Well organized and written. There is an engaging introduction, and a clear thesis statement. All paragraphs in the body of the essay focus on points that explain and support the thesis. Fluent links are made between ideas. A summative conclusion is evident.

2 (C)    Generally organized and written. There is a clear thesis. The writer has made a fair attempt at an introduction, body and conclusion. One or more parts of these may be weak. Some links are made between ideas.

1 (D)    Poorly organized and written. Thesis is unclear. Information is often presented in a random manner. Introduction, body and conclusion are unidentifiable. One of these may be completely missing.

0 (F)    No organization of ideas is evident.
 

Usage:  Spelling and grammar

3. 1 or 2 errors in spelling and grammar are present but they do not interfere with the writer’s meaning.

2 (A)    3-4 errors in spelling and grammar are present and may interfere somewhat with the writer’s meaning.

1 (C)  Several errors in spelling and grammar are apparent and they clearly interfere with the writer’s meaning

0 (F)  Serious errors in spelling and grammar that make reading mostly incomprehensible.


 

Analysis/Critical Thought

5 (A)    Complete/accurate analysis of the topic. Thoroughly addresses conflicting accounts and different points of view. Uses relevant information from sources other than the text in analysis.

4 (B)    Complete/accurate analysis of the topic. Clearly attempts to address conflicting accounts and different points of view. Includes some outside information in analysis.

3 (C)    Accurate analysis of the topic.  Adequately attempts to address conflicting accounts and different points of view.

2 (D)    Limited analysis of the topic.  Minimal attempt to address conflicting accounts and different points of view.

1 (F)    Weak analysis of the topic.  No attempt to address conflicting accounts and different points of view.

0 (F)    No analysis of the topic.  No attempt to address conflicting accounts and different point of view.


 

OVERALL GRADE:



Comparison and Contrast Rubric

CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Purpose & Supporting Details

The paper compares and contrasts items clearly. The paper points to specific examples to illustrate the comparison. The paper includes only the information relevant to the comparison.

The paper compares and contrasts items clearly, but the supporting information is general. The paper includes only the information relevant to the comparison.

The paper compares and contrasts items clearly, but the supporting information is incomplete. The paper may include information that is not relevant to the comparison.

The paper compares or contrasts, but does not include both. There is no supporting information or support is incomplete.

Organization & Structure

The paper breaks the information into whole-to-whole, similarities -to-differences, or point-by-point structure. It follows a consistent order when discussing the comparison.

The paper breaks the information into whole-to-whole, similarities -to-differences, or point-by-point structure but does not follow a consistent order when discussing the comparison.

The paper breaks the information into whole-to-whole, similarities -to-differences, or point-by-point structure, but some information is in the wrong section. Some details are not in a logical or expected order, and this distracts the reader.

Many details are not in a logical or expected order. There is little sense that the writing is organized.

Transitions


The paper moves smoothly from one idea to the next. The paper uses comparison and contrast transition words to show relationships between ideas. The paper uses a variety of sentence structures and transitions.

The paper moves from one idea to the next, but there is little variety. The paper uses comparison and contrast transition words to show relationships between ideas.

Some transitions work well; but connections between other ideas are fuzzy.

The transitions between ideas are unclear or nonexistent.

Grammar & Spelling (Conventions)

Writer makes no errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.

Writer makes 1-2 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.

Writer makes 3-4 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.

Writer makes more than 4 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content


Essential Questions and Understanding for each unit for the year:

Understandings

Life in early hunter-gatherer societies was shaped by their physical environment.



Essential Questions

How did physical geography influence the lives of early humans?



Understandings

Early human societies, through the development of culture, began the process of overcoming the limits set by the physicl environment.



Essential Questions

What were the characteristics of hunter-gatherer societies?



Understandings

The beginning of agriculture, including permanent settlements, was a major step in the advance of civilization.



Questions

How did the beginning of agriculture and the domestication of animals promote the rise of settled communities?



Understandings

Archaeologists continue to find and interpret evidence of early humans and their lives.



Questions

How does archaeology provide knowledge of early human life and its changes?



Understandings

During the New Stone Age, permanent settlements appeared in river valleys and around the Fertile Crescent.


River valleys provided water and rich soil for crops as well as protection from invasion.

Questions

Why did ancient civilizations develop in river valleys?


Where were the earliest civilizations located?

When did these civilizations exist?



Understandings

River valleys were the “Cradles of Civilization.” Early civilizations made major contributions to social, political, and economic progress.



Questions

What were the social, political, and economic characteristics of early civilizations?



Understandings

Religion was a major part of life in all early civilizations.



Questions

What religious traditions developed in ancient civilizations?



Understandings

The monotheism of Abraham became the foundation of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—religions that changed the world. The Hebrews were the first to become monotheists.



Questions

What were the essential beliefs of Judaism?


How did Judaism influence Western civilization?

Understandings

Language and writing were important cultural innovations.



Questions

What forms of language and writing existed in early civilizations?



Understandings

Built on earlier Central Asian and Mesopotamian civilizations, Persia developed the largest empire in the world.


Zoroastrianism was the main Persian religion, although other religions were tolerated.

Questions

How did Persia govern its empire?



Understandings

Classical Indian civilization began in the Indus River Valley, spread to the Ganges River Valley, and then spread throughout the Indian subcontinent. This spread continued with little interruption because of the geographic location.

Indo-Aryan people migrated into the area, creating a structured society (caste system) and blending their beliefs with those of the indigenous people.
During the Golden Age of classical Indian culture, Indian people made significant contributions to world civilization.

Questions

Why were physical geography and location important to the development of Indian civilization?


What impact did the Aryans have on India?

Why was the caste system central to Indian culture?


What were the accomplishments of the Mauryan and Gupta empires?

Understandings

Hinduism was an important contribution of classical India.


Hinduism influenced Indian society and culture and is still practiced in India today.

Questions

What are the beliefs of the Hindu religion?


How did Hinduism influence Indian society and culture?

Understandings

Buddhism was founded by Siddhartha Gautama in a part of India that is in present-day Nepal.


Buddhism became a major faith when Asoka sent missionaries throughout Asia.

Questions

What are the beliefs of Buddhism?


How did Buddhism spread?

Understandings

Classical China was centered on the Huang He (Yellow River) and was geographically isolated. Invaders entered China from the north. The Great Wall was built for China’s protection.


Chinese culture began around 1500 b.c. (b.c.e.). Of Chinese contributions to civilization, Confucianism and Taoism are among the most noted.

Questions

Why was the Great Wall of China built?


What were contributions of classical China to world civilization?
Why were Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism important in the formation of Chinese culture?

Understandings

The physical geography of the Aegean Basin shaped the economic, social, and political development of Greek civilization.


The expansion of Greek civilization through trade and colonization led to the spread of Hellenic culture across the Mediterranean and Black seas.

Questions

How did the mountains, seas, islands, harbors, peninsulas, and straits of the Aegean Basin shape Greek economic, social, and political development and patterns of trade and colonization?



Understandings

Greek mythology was based on a polytheistic religion that was integral to culture, politics, and art in ancient Greece.


Many of Western civilization’s symbols, metaphors, words, and idealized images come from ancient Greek mythology.

Questions

How did mythology help the early Greek civilization explain the natural world and the human condition?

What impact did Greek mythology have on later civilizations and the contemporary world?

Understandings

Classical Athens developed the most democratic system of government the world had ever seen, although not everyone could participate in decision making. It became a foundation of modern democracies.


Contrasting philosophies of government divided the Greek city-states of Athens (democracy) and Sparta (oligarchy).

Questions

How did democracy develop in Athens?


How did Sparta differ from Athens?

Understandings

The Greeks defeated the Persian empire and preserved their political independence.


Competition between Sparta and Athens for control of Greece helped cause the Peloponnesian War.

Questions

Why were wars with Persia important to the development of Greek culture?


Why was the Peloponnesian War important to the spread of Greek culture?

Understandings

Athenian culture during the classical era became one of the foundation stones of Western civilization.



Questions

Why was the leadership of Pericles important to the development of Athenian life and Greek culture?


What were some important contributions of Greek culture to Western civilization?

Understandings

The Macedonian conquest of Greece followed the weakening of Greek defenses during the Peloponnesian Wars.


Alexander the Great adopted Greek culture and spread Hellenistic influences throughout his vast empire.

Questions

How did the empire of Alexander the Great establish a basis for the spread of Hellenistic culture?



Understandings

The city of Rome, with its central location on the Italian peninsula, was able to extend its influence over the entire Mediterranean Basin.


The Italian peninsula was protected by the sea and the arc of the Alps mountains.

Questions

How was geographic location important to the economic, social, and political development of ancient Rome?



Understandings

Roman mythology, like Greek mythology, was based upon a polytheistic religion that was integral to culture, politics, and art.


Many of Western civilization’s symbols, metaphors, words, and idealized images come from ancient Roman mythology.

Questions

What was the source of Roman mythology?


What impact did Roman mythology have on later civilizations?

Understandings

Although women, most aliens (non-Romans living in the Republic), and slaves were excluded from the governing process, the Roman Republic made major strides in the development of representative democracy, which became a foundation of modern democracy.


Questions

How did the government of the Roman Republic become more democratic in its decision making?



Understandings

Social structure in the Roman Republic

  • Patricians: Powerful nobility (few in number)

  • Plebeians: Majority of population

  • Slaves: Not based on race


Citizenship

  • Patrician and plebeian men

  • Selected foreigners

  • Rights and responsibilities of citizenship (e.g., taxes, military service)


Features of democracy

  • Representative democracy

  • Assemblies

  • The Senate

  • Consuls

Laws of Rome codified as Twelve Tables

After the victory over Carthage in the Punic Wars, Rome was able, over the next 100 years, to dominate the Mediterranean basin culture.



Questions

Why was Rome able to conquer Carthage and then go on to extend its influence across the entire Mediterranean basin and much of Western Europe?



Appointments: If you need to schedule an appointment please do not hesitate to make the necessary arrangements.  To arrange a parent conference you can contact the middle school office or contact Mr. Yenshaw at the following email-dyenshaw@aisegypt.com

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** Homework Assignment: Students need to read this paper with their parents this evening and bring it back signed and dated next class period. No lateness will be tolerated. This assignment is worth a homework grade. Students are to keep the syllabus and bring back only this page.

Name of Student ____________________________________________________________________________

Parents Signature: _________________________________________ Date ____________________

Students Signature _________________________________________ Date ____________________


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