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AP European History

Summer Assignment

Email me or text me with questions now or during the summer – I am happy to help at any time!



  • maa@wyhs.net

  • 561-843-7709 – my cell for texting me, please do not phone me, I am happy to get texts but phone calls are for emergencies only


Part I: Terms and questions – see attached chart (185 points)

Here is what you are reading in the textbook: The Making of the West by Lynn Hunt



  1. Chapter 11 An Age of Confidence, 1150-1215 (Pp. 399-431; helpful background reading is listed below in the terms list)

  2. Chapter 12 The Medieval Search for Order and Harmony, 1215-1320 (Pp. 435-462; background reading is listed below in the terms list)

  3. Chapter 13 The Crisis of Late Medieval Society, 1320-1430 (Pp. 467-501)

1. Answer the questions from the attached chart (60 points, 3 points each)



  • Paste/type the questions into a separate document and answer them – list them by chapter (11.1, 11.2 etc) and staple all the questions into one packet.

  • Bullet points only! (ask previous students, bullet points are the best format)! – this should be short, you are not rewriting the textbook, you are thinking of the answer and writing it in your own words

  • You do not have to spend a great deal of time getting the perfect answer, your answers should be notes that help you answer the question, take bullet point notes as you read each section and chapter (the answer to each question may be in more than one section of the textbook). You should probably have about 5 bullet points for each question – a few will have just 2 or 3, a few will have 10.

2. Identify and explain the significance of each term in the attached chart. THIS DOES NOT MEAN A DICTIONARY DEFINITION! (90 points, 2 points each)



  • Paste/type the terms into a separate document and explain them, staple all the terms into one packet.

  • Identify and explain means:

    • define it (what it is, where it happened, when it happened) – use the textbook or you can google the term and actually READ the Wikipedia page

    • And it means explain the importance of the term – importance means to explain why it happened and/or to show what the impact of the term was. You have to think about this, there is no part of the textbook or Wikipedia that specifically says this!

  • This must be in bullet points! Again, take notes on each term as you read, about 2-4 bullet points per term

3. Identify and explain the importance of each person in the attached chart. (35 points, 2 points each)



  • Paste/type the list of people into a document and identify them, staple the people into one packet.

  • For each person write about three bullet points describing who they are, their goals, and their achievements (why they are important at this time in history).


Part II: Essay – see attached assignment for full details (30 points)

Write a five or six paragraph essay based up the following prompt/thesis:

The most important political changes in Eastern/Western Europe between 1150 and 1430 were . . .
Part III: People assignment – see attached assignment for full details (30 points)

Choose three (3) people from the list and create two (2) of the following for each person: diary entry, letter, speech, article, art work.


Plagiarism

A word on plagiarism and independent work. Do this work on your own, this is not a group assignment! You may want to discuss or read with another student, history is best when you are discussing it, but you must be very careful to write your own answers and identifications for the terms. You can do that by discussing a question or term and then working alone to write what you know in your own words. Do not cite, copy, or directly paraphrase the textbook – put things in your own words.


Testing on this material – we will review and discuss this material and these questions in class the first week of school.

  • We will have a test or quiz on this material the first week or two of school (whatever the test schedule allows-we will not know exactly until August)

  • The test will focus on these overall questions (not on just repeating the facts but using them to create a thesis about these topics):

    • the history of Italy, Germany, France, England, Spain, the Catholic Church, and of the Jews between 1150 and 1430

      • you may choose to keep one page for each country/religion and take notes as you read – this will not be collected

      • or you may want to review the entire assignment after you complete it and then create a list for each country/religion

    • what happened in Eastern and Western Europe between 1150 and 1430 politically (government, diplomacy), economically (trade, banking, money), and culturally (religion, arts, daily life)

      • you may choose to keep a one page list for each topic, political, economic, cultural and take notes as you read

      • or you may want to review the entire assignment after you complete it and then create a list for each topic


Summer Assignment Part I: Terms and questions 185 points

Chapter 11: An Age of Confidence, 1150-1215

(Pp. 399-431)

Questions:

Answer these in bullet points!



Terms:

Identify (in bullet points)



People:

For each person write 2-3 bullet points describing who they are, their goals, and their achievements (why they are important at this time in history).



Intro:

  1. What is the author’s main point, or theme, about the chapter? (read the intro and conclusion to answer this)







Chapter 11.1: Governments as Institutions

  1. According to Hunt, what was the “important change in medieval rulership”? (p. 400)

  2. What were Frederick Barbarossa’s territorial conflicts, how did they affect him?

  3. What were the territorial conflicts between England and France, how could Henry be both a king of England and a vassal to the King of France?

  4. Describe the pattern in Eastern Europe of forming a government “under the leadership of one great ruler [which would] fragment under his successor.” (p. 412)

  • Investiture Conflict (see also pp. 368-69

  • Italian communes (see also p. 364)

  • Concordat of Worms (see also p. 369)

  • Fief (see also p. 342)

  • Vassal (see also p. 342)

  • Podesta

  • English common law (and eyres)

  • Magna Carta (1215)

  • King Frederick I (r. 1152-1190) aka Barbarossa

  • Prince Henry the Lion (c. 1130-1195)

  • King Henry II (r. 1154-1189)

  • Philip II (r. 1180-1223)

Chapter 11.2: The Growth of a Vernacular High Culture

  1. What did kings do with their new power and wealth (read the intro, skim pages 413-415)?

  • Vernacular




Chapter 11.3: New Lay and Religious Associations

  1. How did life change as a result of the Commercial Revolution –

    1. For nobles/lords

    2. For peasants

  2. How did new religious groups like the Franciscans, Beguines, and Albigensians challenge the authority of the traditional Catholic Church?

  • Commercial Revolution in the country

  • Commercial Revolution in cities (see also p. 360-65)

  • Guilds/trade guilds

  • Universities




Chapter 11.4 European Aggression Within and Without

  1. List the ways Jews were persecuted in Western Europe (pp. 421-25).

  • Heretic

  • Crusades (see also pp. 372-79)

  • Reconquista (see also Wikipedia)






Chapter 12 The Medieval Search for Order and Harmony, 1215-1320 (Pp. 435-462)


Questions:

Answer these in bullet points!



Terms:

Identify (in bullet points)



  • what,

  • where,

  • when, and

  • why the term is important

People:

For each person write 2-3 bullet points describing who they are, their goals, and their achievements (why they are important at this time in history).



Intro:

  1. What is the author’s main point, or theme, about the chapter? (read the intro and conclusion to answer this)







Chapter 12.1: The Church’s Mission of Reform

  1. How was the Fourth Lateran Council supposed to create harmony – did it create harmony, how did people respond?

  2. How did the Fourth Lateran Council treat Jews?

  • Gregorian Reform (see also pp. 365-372)

  • Fourth Lateran Council (1215)

  • Seven Sacraments (also see Wikipedia)

  • Inquisition

  • Pope Innocent III (r. 1198-1216)




Chapter 12.2: Cultural Harmonies




  • Scholasticism

  • Gothic architecture

  • St. Thomas Aquinas (c. 1225-1274)

  • Dante Alighieri (1265-1321)

Chapter 12.3: The Politics of Control

  1. How did Frederick II weaken the German Empire?

  • Holy Roman Empire

  • Habsburgs

  • Parlement of Paris

  • Parliaments

    • Cortes (Spain)

    • English Parliament

    • Estates General (France)

  • Unam Sanctum

  • Babylonian Captivity

  • Popolo

  • Signori

  • Golden Horde/mongols

  • Frederick II (r. 1212-1250)

  • Louis IX (r. 1226-1270)

  • Pope Boniface VIII (r. 1294-1303)

  • Philip IV (r. 1285-1314)





Chapter 13: The Crisis of Late Medieval Society, 1320-1430

(Pp. 467-501)


Questions:

Answer these in bullet points!



Terms:

Identify (in bullet points)



  • what,

  • where,

  • when, and

  • why the term is important

People:

For each person write 2-3 bullet points describing who they are, their goals, and their achievements (why they are important at this time in history).



Intro:

  1. What is the author’s main point, or theme, about the chapter? (read the intro and conclusion to answer this)







Chapter 13.1: Political Crises across Europe

  1. How did warfare change in the late-Middle Ages?

  2. What were the consequences of the 100 Years’ War?

  3. According to Hunt (textbook author), the Holy Roman Empire remained politically fragmented/divided while England and France were becoming politically unified. Explain the signs of political fragmentation in the HRE (p. 479).

  • 100 Years’ War (1337-1453) (read the textbook pp. 469-76, read the first 3 paragraphs of the Wikipedia page on this war – THEN sum up what you learned about who was fighting and why they were fighting)

  • Jacquerie Uprising (1358)

  • English Peasant revolt (1381, poll tax)

  • Ciompi uprising (1378, in Italy)

  • Golden Bull (1356)

  • Hanseatic League

  • Joan of Arc

Chapter 13.2: The Plague and Society

  1. What did medical knowledge think were the possible causes of the plague and what were their treatments?

  2. What were the religious responses to the plague?

  • Bubonic Plague/Black Death

  • Flagellants




Chapter 13.3: Challenges to Spiritual Authority




  • Great Schism (1378-1417)

  • Conciliar Movement – Council of Constance (1414-1417)

  • Free Spirits

  • Lollards

  • Hussites/Taborites

  • Pope Urban VI

  • Pope Clement VII

  • Pope Martin V

  • John Wycliffe

  • Jan Huss

Chapter 13.4: The Social Order and Cultural Change

  1. Explain public and private life for women 1300-1400s (pp. 493-96).

  2. Why was there an economic depression in the 1300s?




  • Christine de Pizan


Part II: People

30 points
AP European History includes many people you need to know from kings and princes (nobles) to religious leaders, artists, and merchants (and even some peasants). To help you get to know these people better we will be holding debates, salons (to be explained later), and even “brackets” (argue for your pick!). To prepare for our debates/bracket the first week of school you will study and learn about the people in the list below.
People –

  • Choose three (3) of these people to complete the assignment described below

  • staple into packets, one for each person


Chapter 11

  • King Frederick I (r. 1152-1190) aka Barbarossa

  • Prince Henry the Lion (c. 1130-1195)

  • King Henry II (r. 1154-1189)

  • Philip II (r. 1180-1223)


Chapter 12

  • Pope Innocent III (r. 1198-1216)

  • St. Thomas Aquinas (c. 1225-1274)

  • Dante Alighieri (1265-1321)

  • Frederick II (r. 1212-1250)

  • Louis IX (r. 1226-1270)

  • Pope Boniface VIII (r. 1294-1303)

  • Philip IV (r. 1285-1314)


Chapter 13

  • Joan of Arc (1412-1431)

  • Pope Martin V (r. 1417-1431)

  • John Wycliffe (1328-1384)

  • Jan Huss (1369-1415)


Assignment:

For THREE of the people in the list, create TWO (2) of the following:



  1. Diary entry: Imagine and write a diary entry of about one page reflecting their private thoughts about the events surrounding them, their goals, and/or their achievements.

  2. Letter: Imagine and write a one-page letter they might have written to another person from their time period reflecting the events surrounding them, their goals, and/or their achievements.

  3. Speech: Write a one-minute speech they might have given (state the audience for the speech) reflecting the events surrounding them, their goals, and/or their achievements

  4. News article: Write a one-page news article that might have been written at the time period reflecting the events surrounding the person, their goals, and/or their achievements

  5. Art: design and create an art piece that the person would commission an artist to make for him/her. The art should be in the style of Medieval/Gothic Art (you can find this online) and should reflect the events surrounding the person, their goals, and/or their achievements. Write a short explanation of your piece.

Grading Rubric:

“A” work is: well organized, creative, shows knowledge of the time period and the person, is turned in on time, and is original (not plagiarized, copied, paraphrased or otherwise adapted from any source!). Clearly label each part of the assignment (diary, letter, speech, article, or art) and staple together a packet of work for each person.

Part III: Essay

30 points
Question:

Write a five or six paragraph essay based up the following prompt/thesis:



The most important political changes in Eastern/Western Europe between 1150 and 1430 were . . .
Grading rubric:

  • Organization –

    • clearly organized with a complete thesis in the first paragraph (the intro paragraph). A thesis is your answer to the question; in this case, you can write your own thesis based upon the prompt or just finish the prompt

    • body paragraphs with specific details you learned in doing the questions and terms chart that support your thesis, each paragraph is well-organized and focused on one main idea

    • a conclusion that summarizes your thesis and evidence

  • Mechanics – neat, stapled, with your name, the title of the assignment, ½ to 1 inch margins, 2-3 pages, turned in on time

  • Content – Your task in this essay is to identify what YOU think are the most important political changes based upon the facts you gathered in the terms and questions assignment. This is your argument, your opinion, but it must be based on the facts you gathered.

    • I want to see your ideas and your style in this essay AND I want to see how you use the facts to support your arguments.

    • Your thesis and essay will focus on political changes (not economic or cultural changes).

    • And you will show that you understand that eastern and western Europe are two different geographic regions – you can focus on one or include both in your essay but make sure you show that different things happen in each region (don’t describe what is happening in the eastern part as though it is happening in the western part).


Note: I am looking for your best work but I am not looking for perfection. This essay will let me know what I have to teach you about writing for this course. Please do email or text me with any questions you may have.


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