Texas as a Province and Republic 1795-1845 Author Index



Download 5.84 Mb.
Page7/127
Date conversion28.04.2016
Size5.84 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   127

Reel: 8
Austin. Complimentary Party.

Complimentary Party.

[Austin: Printed at the Austin City Gazette Office]. [1841]

432; [Invitation dated Austin, Sept. 16, 1841, and signed by Joseph Lee and five others as a committee of arrangements, to "a Party, to be given at the Capitol to Col. Martin Francisco Peraza, and Don Donaciano G. Rejon, of Yucatan, on Friday Evening next, the 17th inst."]; 4-page folder printed on page [1]. 21.8 x 14 cm.; Peraza and Rejon were in Austin, as representatives of the revolutionary government of Yucatan, negotiating for the sending of vessels of the Texas navy to aid Yucatan in its revolt against Mexico. The note to entry No. 470, Correspondence between the Secretary of State, and Col. Peraza, has an account of these negotiations.; Locations: Tx.



Reel: 6
Austin. Inauguration Ball.

Inauguration Ball.

[Austin: Printed at the Austin City Gazette Office]. [1841]

433; [Invitation dated Austin, 10th December, 1841, signed by John A. Greer and seventeen other managers, including James B. Shaw and Jacob Snively, to a ball "to be given at the Capitol, on Monday evening, the 13th inst."]; 4-page folder printed on page [1]. 16.5 x 11.5 cm.; Locations: TxAuDR (privately owned copy on loan; printed on white silk).



Reel: 6
Austin. Masonic Ball.

Masonic Ball.

[Austin: Printed at the Austin City Gazette Office]. [1841]

434; [Invitation dated Austin, 15th June, 1841, signed by Comp. James Izod and eleven other managers, to a ball "to be given at the Capitol, on Thursday evening, the 24th instant."]; 4-page folder printed on page [1]. 22 x 14 cm.; Locations: Tx. TWS.



Reel: 6
Bahia del Espiritu Santo. Comandante (Juan de Castañeda).

Noticia Plausible.

[At end:] En la imprenta de D. Juan Bautista de Arizpe. [Mexico]. [1817]

674; [Report to Antonio Martinez, Governor of Texas, dated at Bahía, July 26, 1817, transmitted by him to General Arredondo, Comandante General of the Eastern Internal Provinces, and by him to the Viceroy, who ordered this publication.]; 4-page folder printed on first three pages, numbered 987-989.; With heading: Tom. VIII. Núm. 1134 Gaceta Extraordinaria del Gobierno de Mexico. Del Sabado 6 de Septiembre de 1817. This has a report made by the commandant at Bahía on July 26, 1817, to Governor Martínez of Texas that a few days before, when at Matagorda with a small body of troops, he had seen several ships entirely demolished on the banks of the bay. In forwarding this report to Arredondo, the commandant of the Eastern Internal Provinces, Martínez said the destruction must have been by some naval force as no troops had been seen in this locality. Arredondo in turn forwarded the statements to Apodaca, the Viceroy, on August 19. If the report was correct, it probably had some connection with the activities of Lafitte, who had occupied Galveston Island when Aury, Mina and Perry had left for Soto la Marina early in April.; Locations: TxU.



Reel: 12
Baker, Moseley, 1802-1848.

[Circular].

[Galveston: Printed at the Commercial Intelligencer Office]. [1838]

227; [To the Editor of the Galveston Intelligencer.]; [Broadside?]; This undated circular, signed Mosely Baker, in which he tells of relinquishing to the government a grant of forty-six leagues of land on the Sulphur Fork and Trinity rivers, and explains his vote in favor of the Texas Rail Road, Navigation and Banking Company, is reprinted in Stiff's The Texan Emigrant, Cincinnati, 1840, p. 155-166, where, p. 177, it is referred to as a handbill. It and the undated circular referred to below were probably published in the summer of 1838 in Baker's successful campaign for election to the House of the Third Congress. A second circular by Baker, also addressed to the editor of the Intelligencer, is reprinted on pages 166-175 of the Texan Emigrant. Here Baker tells of a suit against him in Alabama, which he says he fully settled. This too was probably issued as a handbill. No copies of either circular have been located.



Reel: 3
Baker, Moseley, 1802-1848.

Letter from Gonzales to the Standing Committee of San Felipe.

[At end:] Published by order of the Committee. [San Felipe de Austin: Printed by Baker & Bordens]. February [i.e. March] 10, 1836

114; [Text begins:] Gonzales, 8th March, 1836. Gentlemen, On day before yesterday I arrived here ... Our own situation is critical--too weak to advance, and insufficient to protect this place--and daily expecting two thousand cavalry to attack us. ... [Signed:] Moseley Baker, Captain. [Addressed to] John R. Jones, Thomas Gay, Wm. Pettus, Committee.; Broadside in two columns. 24.9 x 20 cm.; At this time news of the fall of the Alamo had not reached Gonzales, but the letter is nonetheless a desperate appeal for help, saying that unless three thousand men are concentrated at Gonzales within a fortnight "Texas is gone, and our universal destruction and conflagration will be the result. In the name of God, send us assistance--send out the men; and let all who remain, without satisfactory reasons, be henceforward branded as a coward and a traitor, and an enemy to Texas. ... Some of my company are without guns. ... Not a pound of lead. ... Unless Texas is victorious, I shall never return." This is the first of several entries by or relating to Moseley Baker. A good sketch of him in the Handbook of Texas tells of his various activities as advocate of Texas independence, captain of a company at San Jacinto and twice brigadier general; later, an incorporator of the Texas Railroad, Navigation and Banking Company, a member of the First and Third Congresses, and finally at his death a Methodist minister. The sketch of him in the Writings of Sam Houston, Vol. I, p. 396-397, characterizes him as "an able, but a restless, impulsive man." Baker and Bordens' account approved July 6, 1836 (Ms., Texas State Library), has a charge for printing 200 copies of "Baker's Letter by order of Committee."; Locations: Tx. TxU.



Reel: 1
[Baker, Moseley, 1802-1848].

... To the Hon. John Quincy Adams, and the other Twenty Members of Congress who addressed "the people of the Free States of the Union," remonstrating against the Annexation of Texas to the American Union.

[Houston: Printed at the Telegraph Office]. [1843]

552; 7 p., printed in double columns. 24 cm.; Caption title, dated at head: Houston, (Texas,) October 29th, 1843. Signed at end: John Adams.; This is a very able letter, dated at the beginning, Houston (Texas,) October 29th, 1843, and signed at the end, "John Adams," urging John Quincy Adams and his associates in the Congress of the United States not to oppose the annexation of Texas. The history of the colonization of Texas by citizens of the United States and the law of April 6, 1830, is reviewed and arguments in favor of annexation are addressed first to citizens of the northern part of the United States, who are opposed to slavery, and then to citizens of the South, who favor slavery. There are two pieces of evidence which, when joined together, indicate that Moseley Baker was probably the author of this pamphlet. The first is a letter in the Morgan Papers at the Rosenberg Library (called to my attention many years ago by Mr. E.W. Winkler; photostat in my collection), written by James Morgan to a Mrs. J.M. Storms and dated, 26th January 1844, in which in discussing annexation, Morgan refers to this pamphlet with the remark, "John Adams to the contrary notwithstanding," and adds in the margin, "See pamphlet sent you signed John Adams--written by Genl. Baker." The other bit of evidence is in the Telegraph and Texas Register for November 8, 1843, which prints this John Adams letter in full with the editorial comment that "it is from the pen of a gentleman who has held high and honorable offices under the government, and has been distinguished in the battlefields and in the legislative halls of his country. He is one of the oldest citizens of the country and is intimately acquainted with its civil and political history." Moseley Baker, who held the rank of Brigadier General in the Texas Army and was a member of the House of Representatives of the First and Third Congresses, fits these two descriptions in all respects except that of being "one of the oldest citizens of the country." I know of no other Texas Baker who to the slightest degree fits the specifications of the Morgan letter and the Telegraph editorial comment. The letter was also published in the Morning Star of Houston in the issues for November 2, 4 and 7, with the lining, paragraphing, and italicized words the same as in the pamphlet, indicating that the pamphlet was printed on the press of the Telegraph on which the Morning Star was printed. There is also an eight-page edition of this pamphlet, dated, not at the beginning but at the end, October 20, 1843, and not October 29th, entry No. 1447. Sabin 95129 only describes the eight-page edition.; Locations: DNA (copies State Department Diplomatic Despatches, Texas, Volume 2, and State Department Miscellaneous Letters, November-December 1843, enclosure to a letter of November 27, 1843, from George Fisher to the Secretary of State).



Reel: 9
[Baker, Moseley, 1802-1848].

To the Hon. John Quincy Adams, and the other Twenty Members of Congress who addressed "The People of the Free States of the Union," remonstrating against the Annexation of Texas to the American Union.

[Washington]. [1843]

1447; 8 p., text printed in double columns. 24 cm.; Caption title.; Signed and dated at end: John Adams. Houston, Texas, October 20, 1843. This is a later printing of a document first printed at Houston (entry No. 552). The note to the entry gives the reasons for ascribing this letter to Moseley Baker and briefly states its contents.; Rader 43. Sabin 95129.; Locations: CU-B. CtY. DLC. ICN. NHi. TxU. TWS.



Reel: 32
Baker, Moseley, 1802-1848.

To the Voters of the County of Austin.

[Columbia: Printed at the Telegraph Office]. [1836]

115; [Text begins:] At the request of many of the citizens of the county of Austin, I have been induced to become a candidate for Representative in the first Congress of our infant Republic. ... [Signed at end:] Moseley Baker.; Broadside in three columns. 41.7 x 33.5 cm.; This characteristic address calling for a trial of Santa Anna and annexation to the United States was printed in the Telegraph for August 23, 1836, and this broadside was probably printed at about the same time. Burnet's proclamation calling for the election to be held the first Monday of September was dated Velasco, July 23, 1836, and appeared in the Telegraph for August 2, and weekly thereafter through August. Baker won the election.; Locations: TxU.



Reel: 1
Banco Nacional de Amortizacion.

Contestacion … sobre ... ausilios para la guerra de Tejas.

See note to entry No. 965.
Baptists, Texas. Sabine Baptist Association.

Minutes of the Baptist convention. The Republic of Texas - County of Nacogdoches. Union Church, Nov. 11th, 1843.

[San Augustine? Printed at the Red-Lander Office?]. [1843?]

552.1; Broadside 39 x 27 cm.; Caption title.; Text in three columns. Signed: Lemuel Herren, President; James Davenport, Secretary. Following the minutes are the Constitution, Articles of Faith, and Rules of Decorum. Although there is no imprint, the type face is similar to that of the Red-Lander in the 1845 Minutes of this association, entry No. 615.2. For the Minutes of the 1844 meeting, see entry No. 1473.1.; Locations: TxWB.



Reel: 9
Baptists, Texas. Sabine Baptist Association.

Minutes of the first anniversary of the Sabine Baptist Association; held with the Border Church, Harrison County, Texas, on the 5th and 7th October, 1844.

Shreveport, La., Caddo Gazette - Printer. 1844

1473.1; 3, [1] p. 21 1/2 cm.; Signed: Lemuel Herren, Moderator; B.B.B. Hunter, Clerk. For Minutes of the first meeting of this Association, together with its Constitution, see entry No. 552.1; Locations: TxWB.



Reel: 33
Baptists, Texas. Sabine Baptist Association.

Minutes of the Sabine Baptist Association: held at Bethel Church - Sabine County, Texas. Commencing on Saturday, before the first Lord's day in October, A.D. 1845.

[San Augustine, Texas] Printed at the "Red-Lander" office. [1845]

615.2; 8p. 21 cm.; "300 copies ordered." Signed: Asa Wright, Moderator; William M. Hewitt, Clerk.; Locations: TxWB.



Reel: 10
Baptists, Texas. Union Association of the Regular Baptist Faith and Order.

[Minutes of the Fourth Annual Meeting, of the Union Association of the Regular Predestinarian Baptist Faith and Order: Begun and held at the Hopewell Church, in Nacogdoches County, Republic of Texas; Saturday, the 7th of October, 1843, and two following days].

[San Augustine: Printed at the Red-Lander Office]. [1843]

553; No copy located, but in The Red-Lander (San Augustine) for October 21, 1843, the editor announces, "We have published a pamphlet this week for the 'Union Association of the Regular Predestinarian Baptist Faith and Order,' and have transmitted its contents to our columns." The contents of the pamphlet as published in the newspaper include the "Minutes," signed by Daniel Parker as Moderator, followed by a letter, also signed by Parker, dated at end "Republic of Texas, Houston County, Sept. 24, 1843.", and beginning, "For the 'Western Predestinarian Baptist,' and through that paper to David Benedict, Post Master, Pawtucket, Rhode Island:". Judging from the republication, the letter made up the bulk of the pamphlet. See the note to entry No. 436 for information on this association.



Reel: 9
Baptists, Texas. Union Association of the Regular Baptist Faith and Order.

... The Proceedings of the Convention in the Formation of the Union Association with the Minutes of the Proceedings.

[n.p.]. [1841?]

436; 8 p. 23 cm.; Caption title.; At head of title: Republic of Texas. County of Nacogdoches. This crudely printed and badly frayed pamphlet gives an account of the first two meetings of a small association of Primitive Baptist churches, of which the leading spirit was Daniel Parker, brother of Silas M. Parker, and of James W. Parker with whom he went to Texas in a colonizing expedition in 1832. For an account of the orthodox and much larger Union Baptist Association, which also held its first meeting in October, 1840, see entry No. 379, Minutes of the First Session of the Union Baptist Association ... Oct. 8th, 1840, Houston, 1840. Here (p. [1]-4), a record of the proceedings of a convention held "at Hopewell Meeting House, near the town of Douglas ... on the 17th day of October 1840," which organized the Union Association, is signed by Daniel Parker at the end on p. 4 as Moderator, and by Garrison Greenwood as Secretary. This is followed on p. 4-5 by "Minutes of the 2d annual meeting of the Union Association of regular Baptists, began and held at Boggy Bayou Meeting House in Caddo Parish, La., on the 11th day of Sept. 1841." At the end, p. 5-9, is a circular, "The Union Association of the regular Baptist Faith and order to the Churches of whom She is composed." This is also signed at the end, D. Parker, Moderator. G. Greenwood, Clerk. At its second annual meeting, the Association appointed Elder D. Parker to superintend the printing of these minutes, and the minutes of the preceding Association. I had thought that this pamphlet might have been printed on the press of the Red-Lander at San Augustine, but this is not readily apparent from a comparison of types. Most of the issue of the Quarterly, Texas State Historical Association, for October, 1907, Vol. XI, p. [85]-156, is taken up under the title, "The Records of an Early Texas Baptist Church," with records for the period 1833-1847 found in "The Church Book, belonging to the Pilgrim Predestinarean Regular Baptist Church of Jesus Christ," the church founded by Daniel Parker. There is much in these records relating to Daniel Parker, and on p. 118 is a reference to the meeting to be held at Hopewell on October 17, 1840; and on p. 127 is a record of appointing "Elders G. Greenwood, and D. Parker" to the September, 1841, meeting of the Association.; See entry No. 553 for the Fourth Annual Meeting of the Union Association of the Regular Baptist Faith and Order. No copy of this last has been located. Hogan in his Texas Republic, p. 198, gives a short account of this association of Primitive Baptists.; Locations: TxWB.



Reel: 6
Baptists, Texas. Union Baptist Association.

Minutes of a Called Session of the United [i.e. Union] Baptist Association, Held at the Mt. Gilead Church, Washington Co., Texas, on Saturday, November 26th, 1842.

Washington: Printed by Thomas Johnson--Public Printer. 1843

554; Pages [1]-6; 9-10; folding table at end. 21.8 cm.; Mr. L.R. Elliott, Librarian of the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary writes me that their copy, the only one located, is so tightly bound with copies of the other minutes that it is impossible to tell whether the folding table was meant to be considered to be pages [7]-[8], or those two pages are missing. The text does not indicate missing pages. Although the name of the association appears on the title page as "United Baptist," in the second paragraph of the Minutes it is given as "Union Baptist," as in other publications of that group entered here. The opening paragraph of the Minutes recites that on account of "invasion and war" it was not practicable to hold the regular meeting at the appointed time. The following officers were elected for the ensuing year: William M. Tryon, Moderator; William H. Ewing, Clerk; R.E.B. Baylor, Corresponding Secretary; and J.D. Harvey, Treasurer. One of the resolutions was to "recommend to the different Churches, the 25th of December next, as a day to be spent in fasting and prayer." For a general note on these annual meetings, see entry No. 379.; Locations: TxFwSB.



Reel: 9
Baptists, Texas. Union Baptist Association.

Minutes of the Fifth Anniversary Meeting of the Union Baptist Association, convened at Plum-Grove Church, Fayette County, Texas, August 29th, 1844, and days following.

Washington: Printed at the Vindicator Office. 1844

583; 13 p., 1 leaf (table). 21 cm.; Here the Minutes, p. [3]-5, are followed, p. 6, by a report of a committee of which R.E.B. Baylor was chairman, regarding the organization of churches, and on p. 7-9 by a report of a committee, also headed by Baylor, setting forth sixteen "Articles of Faith." These were unanimously adopted. At the end, p. 10-13, is W.M. Tryon's "Circular Letter." Tryon and Baylor were re-elected as Moderator and Corresponding Secretary. The table at the end shows that thirteen of the fifteen churches in the Association were represented at the meeting. For a general note on this association see the note to the first meeting, entry No. 379.; Locations: TxFwSB.



Reel: 9
Baptists, Texas. Union Baptist Association.

Minutes of the First Session of the Union Baptist Association, begun and held in the Town of Travis, in Western Texas, Oct. 8th, 1840.



Houston: Telegraph Press. 1840

379; 16 p. 21.5 cm.; At this time in the Baptist Church there were two groups which may roughly be designated as Missionary Baptists and Anti-Missionary Baptists, the latter being also referred to as "Primitive Baptists" and "Hard Shelled Baptists." This Union Baptist Association was organized by a Missionary Baptist group headed by T.W. Cox, pastor of the three churches represented at the meeting--Travis in Austin County, Independence in Washington County, and La Grange in Fayette County. At the first meeting Cox was elected moderator, R.E.B. Baylor, corresponding secretary, and J.W. Collins, clerk. Neither Cox nor Collins has a sketch in the Handbook of Texas, though Cox probably deserves mention as the organizer of the first association of orthodox Baptists in Texas. There is a sketch of Baylor (born in 1793) in the Handbook of Texas and also in the Dictionary of American Biography. An Alabama lawyer and ordained a Baptist minister in 1839, he had only recently come to Texas, where he became prominent as a judge and clergyman, traveling, as said in the Handbook of Texas, on horseback over the country for more than twenty years, "with the laws of Texas in one saddlebag and the Holy Bible in the other." Baylor University is named for him. The Association grew in strength with the years and even by the time of its next annual meeting, held near Rutersville in October, 1841, entry No. 504, had such distinguished leaders as William M. Tryon and James Huckins. The following year Z.N. Morrell, a leading Texan, became prominent in the affairs of the association. There are sketches of all three in the Handbook. Here the Minutes, p. [3]-7, are followed by the Articles of Faith, p. 8-9; Bill of Inalienable Rights, p. 9-10; and Constitution, p. 10-12, all of which had apparently been previously adopted by the churches. The Rules of Decorum, p. 12-13, which were adopted at the meeting, are followed by a table of the three churches represented at the meeting, with the names of their representatives, pastors, and the like, and their times of meeting. At the end, p. 15-16, is the circular letter signed by R.E.B. Baylor. The second meeting of this association assembled near Rutersville, "in Western Texas" on October 7, 1841, entry No. 504. The third meeting of this association, a called session, entry No. 554, was held at Mt. Gilead Church in Washington County in November, 1842; the fourth, entry No. 582, at Providence Church in Washington County in October, 1843; the fifth, entry No. 583, held at Plum-Grove Church in Fayette County in August, 1844; and the sixth, entry No. 616, again at Mt. Gilead Church in Washington County in October, 1845. This Union Baptist Association should be distinguished from the Union Association of the Regular Baptist Faith and Order, of which Elder Daniel Parker was the leading spirit. This was the organization of the Anti-Missionary or Primitive Baptists. For the proceedings of their organization meeting see entry No. 436, and for an entry for its fourth meeting see No. 553. Though poorly arranged and at times lacking in clarity, the best secondary account of these Baptist associations I have seen is J.M. Carroll's History of Texas Baptists, Dallas, 1923.; Locations:; TxFwSB.

Reel: 6
Baptists, Texas. Union Baptist Association.

Minutes of the Fourth Anniversary Meeting of the Union Baptist Association, convened at Providence Church, Washington County, October 6, 1843, and days following.

Washington: Printed by Thomas Johnson. 1844

582; 8 p., folding table. 22 cm.; This was an important meeting as a report was adopted revising the "Articles of Faith, Bill of rights and Constitution of the Union Baptist Association." Two articles were added to the "Rules of Decorum," and the "Bill of Inalienable Rights" adopted at the first meeting was dropped. W.M. Tryon and R.E.B. Baylor, whose biographies are referred to in the note for the first meeting, entry No. 379, were re-elected Moderator and Corresponding Secretary. Eleven of the fourteen churches in the Association were represented at the meeting. For a general note on the Association see the note to the first meeting, entry No. 379.; Locations: TxFwSB.



Reel: 9
Baptists, Texas. Union Baptist Association.

Minutes of the Second Annual Session of the Union Baptist Association, held at the Clear Creek Meeting House, near Rutersville, in Western Texas, commencing on the 7th October, 1841.

Houston Telegraph Power Press. 1842

504; Pages [1]-9; p. [10] blank; p. 13-19; folding table between p. [10] and 13. 18.5 cm.; Mr. L.R. Elliott, Librarian of the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, writes me that their copy, the only one located, is so tightly bound with copies of the other minutes that it is impossible to tell whether the folding table was considered to be pages [11]-[12], or those two pages are missing. The text does not indicate missing pages. It appears from these Minutes that this second meeting was organized by the three churches, Travis, Independence, and La Grange, of which T.W. Cox was pastor, which had assembled for the first meeting held at Travis in October, 1840, entry No. 379. Six other churches, including Galveston and Houston, of which James Huckins was the pastor, and three, Washington, Providence, and Mount Gilead, of which W.M. Tryon was pastor, were admitted to membership. The Minutes, p. [3]-9, followed by the list of churches and delegates, p. [11-12], end with an address by James Huckins, p. 13-19. T.W. Cox, who had been moderator of the 1840 meeting but whose orthodoxy had been questioned, was not elected to any office, the officers for the ensuing year being William M. Tryon, Moderator; S.P. Andrews, Clerk; R.E.B. Baylor, Corresponding Secretary; and J.W. Collins, Treasurer. Another prominent member of this meeting was Z.N. Morrell, of whom there is an interesting sketch in the Handbook of Texas. For a general note on this association see note to the first meeting, entry No. 379.; Locations: TxFwSB.


1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   127


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page