Texas as a Province and Republic 1795-1845 Author Index



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Reel: 1
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

Esposicion al publico Sobre los Asuntos de Tejas.

Megico: En casa de Cornelio C. Sebring. 1835

817; Por el C. Estevan F. Austin.; 32 p. 19.5 cm. Plain paper wrappers.; Page 29 misnumbered 31.; This Esposicion was written shortly after Austin's release on bail from his long confinement at Mexico City and is dated at the end of its main text, Megico, Enero 18, de 1835. It is followed on page 26, by five numbered exhibits. These include an extract from the instructions to Austin of the Texas convention which had met in April, 1833, and a copy of Austin's letter of October 2, 1833, to the ayuntamiento of Bexar, the letter which led to his arrest at Saltillo on January 3, 1834, as he was returning to Texas. The Esposicion, written in the third person, is primarily an able defense of the memorial adopted by the Convention of April, 1833, and an explanation of the letter of October 2, 1833, which had caused Austin's arrest. It is one of the important Texas documents. A translation into English of the Esposicion is given in the Texas Historical Association Quarterly for January, 1905, Volume VIII, at pages 232-258. Dr. Barker says that 450 copies were printed (Life of Austin, page 451, note).; Rader 213. Raines, p. 15.; Locations: CSmH. CU-B. CtY. DLC. MiU-C. TxDaM. TxU. BNM. TWS.



Reel: 13
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

Letter from S.F. Austin to G. Borden, Jr.

[At end:] Printed at the Office of the "Telegraph," Columbia, Texas. [1836]

113; [Text begins:] Mr. G. Borden Jr.: Dear Sir, -- I have just received your letter of the 15th instant, informing me that great efforts are making to circulate reports and slanders, for the purpose of injuring me, at the election which is to be held on the first Monday of next month [Sept. 1836]. ... I feel but little anxiety, of a personal character, whether I am elected or not. ... To place before you in a succinct manner, the nature of the reports spoken of by you, I will recall to your mind a few facts in relation to the past. ... [Signed at end:] Respectfully, your fellow citizen, S.F. Austin.; Broadside in two columns. 41.9 x 28 cm.; The tragedy of Austin's career was that many Texans believed the charge spread by his enemies that he had shared in the gigantic land speculations engineered early in 1835 by his close associate Samuel M. Williams. Borden's letter had said that even some of Austin's "old devoted friends" wanted assurance that "he had no hand in the big land purchase."; Austin's letter is a noble apologia pro vita sua by a man who had spent himself for Texas and cared little whether or not he was elected. It had little effect and Houston was elected president of Texas by a great majority. Though the letter is undated here and in the reprinting in the Austin Papers, Vol. III, p. 418-421, it is dated, Peach Point, August 18, in the printing in the Telegraph and Texas Register for August 23, 1836.; Locations: NcU (Southern Historical Collection). TxU. TWS.



Reel: 1
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

Notice. [To colonists in Austin's Colony].

[San Felipe de Austin: Printed by G.B. Cotten]. [1829]

11; [Text begins:] Each Emigrant who has removed to this Colony ... [Signed and dated at end:] S.F. Austin. Town of Austin, 20th November, 1829.; Broadside in two columns. 19.5 x 24.5 cm.; This Notice gives explicit information as to just what facts an immigrant had to furnish in writing before receiving a "certificate of reception" to present to the commissioner and just what fees he had to pay, and what would render the certificate null and void. It even gives the text of the petition the immigrant had to present to Austin, one of the statements of which reads, "I agree to the terms published by you, on the 20th November, 1829"; that is, the terms in this Notice. This Notice, with its instructions and the text of the petition to be made by the immigrant and the certificate that he had been admitted as a colonist, shows the first steps towards admission to the colony. The first charge against Austin in G.B. Cotten's printing bill for 1829-1830 was for $14 made on November 20, 1829, "to printing 50 certificates and 25 Notices" (Austin Papers, Vol. II, p. 562-563). The "certificates" were the certificates of admission, entry No. 9. Since the text of this notice has apparently not been reprinted, and hence is not readily available to present-day scholars, a reproduction is given. For a short outline of the forms relating to colonization, see the note to entry No. 9.; Locations: Tx-LO.



Reel: 1
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

Public Notice, Is Hereby Given, That Mr. Miguel Arciniega ... is expected at this place, in two or three days, to make a final close of all the Land Business in the Colonies, for which he is Commissioner.

[Brazoria: Printed by D.W. Anthony]. [1832]

25; [Signed and dated at end:] S.F. Austin. San Felipe de Austin, 9th October, 1832.; Broadside. 29.5 x 26 cm.; The full text of this Notice is given in the Austin Papers, Vol. II, p. 870-871. For Arciniega's appointment and reference to deeds issued by him, see note to entry No. 13.; Locations: TxU.



Reel: 1
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

To the settlers in Austins [sic] settlement.

[San Antonio de Bexar: Asbridge, Printer]. [1823]

3; [Signed and dated at end:] Stephen F. Austin Province of Texas, July, 1823.; Broadside in two columns separated by rule made up of printer's ornaments. 48 x 31 cm.; This fine address by Austin to his colonists was issued when, on his return to Texas in July, 1823, after his long absence in Mexico, he found his settlement almost deserted. The only example known is the proof copy in my collection with many corrections in Austin's hand. When this address was issued, the principal asset of Austin's first colony was the faith and character of Stephen F. Austin. Now, over one hundred and twenty-five years later, more than seven million people call Texas their home and it is known as one of the richest and most prosperous states of the Union. This proclamation, "To the settlers in Austins settlement," marking the beginning of the successful colonization of Texas, seems to me to be one of the most important of Texas documents. This must be about the last production of the press while it was at Bexar, for Austin, who returned to Texas with the new governor, Luciano Garcia, did not arrive at Bexar until about the end of June, and the printing press was sent to Monterrey on July 17. The late Charles P. Everitt in his Adventures of a Treasure Hunter, Boston, 1951 (p. 201-202), tells the story, though not quite accurately, of my purchase of this broadside from him many years ago, and of the restoration of the lines at the foot, then missing.; Locations: TWS (five lines and part of four others at the foot of the first column, and five lines at the foot of the second column supplied in facsimile from the reprinting of the broadside in the Franklin Missouri Intelligencer of October 14, 1823).



Reel: 1
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

Translation of the Laws, Orders and Contracts, on Colonization, from January 1821, up to 1829; in Virtue of Which, Col. Stephen F. Austin Introduced and Settled Foreign Emigrants in Texas.

Columbia: Re-Printed by Borden & Moore, Public Printers. 1837

186; With an Explanatory Introduction. 81 p. 21.2 cm.; This, as said in the note to the first edition of 1829 (entry No. 12), is the first reprinting of Austin's famous book. It does not include the Civil or Criminal Regulations, or the Martinez letter of August 14, 1821, but it does include all of Austin's many notes. The news that a new edition was under way is given in a letter Gail Borden, Jr., wrote from Columbia to James F. Perry at "Brazoria, Peach Point, Texas," under date of April 6, 1837, reading in part: "We are now publishing in pamphlet, or rather re-publishing the whole (except the municipal regulations) of Gen" Austin's pamphlet. Will you not want 100 copies of Genl. Austin's pamphlet to send and get bound? We are publishing it upon our own responsibility." (I am indebted to Mr. Winkler for the foregoing quotation.) A few days later there was a republication by the Telegraph in its last issue at Columbia, that of April 11, 1837, of some of the laws and orders, and an announcement that they would be reissued in pamphlet form as only 300 copies had been printed in 1829. Though Columbia is named in the imprint, the printing of the pamphlet may not have been completed until after the press had been moved to Houston (the first issue of the paper at Houston was that of May 2), as the republication of selections in the newspaper was continued through May 26, and the publication in pamphlet form announced in that issue. This incomplete 1837 text is reprinted in White's New Collection of Laws, Philadelphia, 1839 (entry No. 1359). It was also reprinted in Gammel, Vol. I, p. [1]-58, with a misleading title page and the imprint, "Saltillo. 1829." There Austin's notes are omitted, so it is quite unsatisfactory as an authority. For a discussion of the book and an account of its reprintings see the note to the first edition of 1829 (entry No. 12).; Sabin 94945.; Locations: CU-B. CtY. DLC. MBAt. MH-L. NHi. NNLI. TxU. TxWB. TxWFM. Graff. TWS.



Reel: 2
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

Translation of the Laws, Orders, and Contracts, on Colonization, from January, 1821, up to this time, in virtue of which Col. Stephen F. Austin, has introduced and settled foreign emigrants in Texas, with an Explanatory Introduction.



San Filipe [sic] de Austin, Texas: Printed by Godwin B. Cotton. November, 1829

12; 70, [1] p. 19.3 cm.; Contents: Title, verso blank; Introduction, p. [3]-24; Advertisement, p. [25]-27; Translations, p. [28]-58; Civil Regulations, p. [59]-65; Criminal Regulations, p. [66]-70; Errata, [1] p., verso blank.; This is Austin's contemporary account of the establishment of the first Anglo-American settlement of Texas. The account is buttressed by English translations of the documents and laws relating to the founding of the colony and includes the Civil Regulations and Criminal Regulations by which the settlements were governed until February, 1828. It is one of the fundamental Texas books. The Laws, Orders and Contracts also has the distinction of being the first book or pamphlet of over twelve pages to have been printed in Texas and, oddly enough, though parts have often been reprinted, the full text is only available in this first edition. The account of the founding (p. [3]-24) is followed by a three-page "Advertisement" or preface to the documents which is dated at the end, on p. 27, San Felipe de Austin, 1st November, 1829, and is signed by Austin. Translations of various decrees, letters, and contracts, relating to the establishment of the Austin colonies then follow (p. [28]-58), with the Civil and Criminal Regulations at p. 59-70. A page of errata at the end gives the text of a letter of Gov. Martinez to Austin dated Bexar, 14th August, 1821, which was omitted from its proper order in the text. The Civil and Criminal Regulations constituted a civil and criminal code which governed the colony from May 24, 1824, when they were approved by Saucedo, the Political Chief of the Province of Texas, until the establishment of the ayuntamiento of San Felipe de Austin in February, 1828. As they constitute the first code of the first American settlement of Texas they seem to me to be of great importance. The Civil Regulations as originally drawn by Austin are in 30 articles and are dated at San Felipe on January 22, 1824, and signed by Austin. Then follow two additional articles also signed by Austin and dated May 23, 1824, preceded by the statement "Additional Articles dictated by the Political Chief of the Province of Texas." One of these new articles related to the branding of cattle, this being the first regulation adopted in Texas on what was later to become one of the great industries of Texas. Though the date "November, 1829," appears on the title page of the Laws, Orders and Contracts, it was not published until January, 1830. Godwin B. Cotten had established a printing press at San Felipe in September, or possibly August, 1829, and had issued the first number of his Texas Gazette on September 25, 1829. In the first five issues of the Gazette, the Militia Law, the Executive Law, and the Municipal Ordinance for the Government of the Municipality of Austin were printed in full (see notes to entry Nos. 16 and 17). They were also published as separates. Austin and his colonists were anxious to get the decrees relating to the establishment of the colony into print so publication of the Gazette was suspended after the issue of November 7, 1829, and not resumed until the issue of January 23, 1830. During this period the Laws, Orders and Contracts were printed in an edition of 300 copies (Texas Gazette, Vol. I, No. 7, January 23, 1830). Apparently Cotten printed these Laws for his own account, for in his printing bill against Austin (Austin Papers, Vol. II, p. 562-563) he makes a charge of $13.50 for "9 pamphlets" on January 15, 1830, and the entry on January 23 reads "to 175 copies of Pamphlet at 1.50 262.50," and there is an advertisement in the Gazette on March 27, 1830, and from time to time thereafter, offering the book for sale. The first reprinting of Austin's Laws, Orders and Contracts was at Columbia, Texas, in 1837 by Borden & Moore, Public Printers (entry No. 186). This edition did not include the Civil or Criminal Regulations or the Martinez letter of August 14, 1821, but it did include all of Austin's many notes, some of which cited authorities while others explained more fully matters stated in the text. The incomplete 1837 text was reprinted in Gammel, Vol. I, p. [1]-58, with a misleading title page and the imprint, "Saltillo. 1829," and without any of Austin's notes, so it is quite unsatisfactory as an authority. Guy M. Bryant in Chapter II of Part II of Vol. I of A Comprehensive History of Texas, Dallas, 1898, edited by Dudley G. Wooten, reprints much of Austin's account but only one of the notes and in Chapter III he reprints many, but not all, of the documents given in the first edition and again leaves out many of the notes. The Comprehensive History does reprint the Martinez letter of August 14, 1821, and (omitting an Austin note) the Civil and Criminal Regulations, but otherwise is quite inferior to the second edition of 1837. About the only merit I have discovered thus far in Wortham's five-volume History of Texas, Fort Worth, 1924, is that he prints the Civil and Criminal Regulations in an appendix to Volume I, but without, as far as I have been able to find, making the slightest reference to the Regulations in his text. Some of the decrees and documents which Austin includes in his Laws, Orders and Contracts are given in Volume I of J.M. White's New Collection of Laws, Philadelphia, 1839 (entry No. 1359), and some in Volume I of Sayles' Early Laws of Texas, St. Louis, 1888, but neither of these two authorities gives Austin's Civil and Criminal Regulations. The rarity of this pamphlet as early as 1836 is shown by an advertisement in the Telegraph and Texas Register for November 30 and December 6, 1836, reading, "Wanted. One or two copies of the pamphlet published by colonel S.F. Austin, in 1829, containing translations of the colonization laws, and of Austin's contracts with the government as empresario. Five dollars for each will be given for them on delivery at this office. Columbia, November 29, 1836.". Mr. Winkler has an interesting article on this pamphlet entitled, "The First Book Printed in Texas," in the Library Chronicle of the University of Texas, for the Spring of 1947, Vol. II, p. 183-186.; Raines, p. 15. Sabin 94945.; Locations: C-S (presentation copy to Lucas Aleman). CtY. NHi. NN. PPL. TxU. TWS.

Reel: 1
Austin, Stephen Fuller. Estate.

Executor's Sale.

[Houston: Printed at the Telegraph Office]. [1838]

226; [Announcement of sale of tracts of land to be held at Houston, December 11, 1838. Text begins:] Will be Sold to the highest Bidder, by order of the honorable the Probate Court for the county of Brazoria. On Tuesday, December 11th ... at the City Hotel ... [At end:] James F. Perry, Executor of Stephen F. Austin, dec'd. Houston, December 10, 1838.; Broadside. 40.9 x 29.8 cm.; The auction sale for June 15, 1838, of entry Nos. 225 and 225A, listed parcels of land in the Pine Point league and on Bray's Bayou, which were to be broken up and sold in smaller tracts. Here seven tracts from each of those large parcels are advertised. Probably they did not move at the June 15 sale.; Locations: TxU. TWS.



Reel: 3
Austin, Stephen Fuller. Estate.

Executor's Sale.

[Houston: Printed at the Telegraph Office]. [1838]

225; [Announcement of sales of various tracts of land to be held at various places and times, with first sale to be at Houston, June 15, next. Text begins:] Will be sold by order of the Hon. the Probate Court for the county of Brazoria, to the highest bidder, the following valuable property, belonging to the succession of Stephen F. Austin, dec'd. ... [At end:] James F. Perry, Executor of Stephen F. Austin, deceased. May, 1838.; Broadside. 43 x 27.5 cm.; The two main parcels emphasized in this advertisement are, first, a block of about 2,200 acres divided into tracts of from 50 to 150 acres each, on Bray's Bayou "11/8 miles from the city of Houston" and, second, a block of about 3,300 acres on Buffalo Bayou, "about 8 miles above the city of Houston, known as the Pine Point league." There is information here on another sale to be held at San Felipe de Austin on June 22, and on a sale to be held at Bastrop on June 29. I do not find anything on Austin's estate in Barker's Life of Austin, and the only reference to the estate in the index to the first forty volumes of the Southwestern Historical Quarterly turns out to be a biography of Henry Austin, where (Vol. XXXVII, p. 207) there is a paragraph on Henry Austin's account, completed in 1837, of the land and empresario contracts of Stephen F. Austin. That seems to be primarily a list of the amount and location of lands received by each one of some 1,540 colonists. There is a brief reference to the tracts of lands in Austin's estate in a letter of J.F. Perry to Mirabeau B. Lamar of December 4, 1837, given in the Lamar Papers, Vol. I, p. 589.; Locations: TWS.



Reel: 3
Austin, Stephen Fuller. Estate.

Executor's Sale.

Telegraph Press --- Houston. [1838]

225A; Another issue [of entry No. 225] identical except for the addition of the following imprint just below the executor's signature: Telegraph Press --- Houston. [1838.]; Broadside. 49.5 x 35 cm.; The two main parcels emphasized in this advertisement are, first, a block of about 2,200 acres divided into tracts of from 50 to 150 acres each, on Bray's Bayou "11/8 miles from the city of Houston" and, second, a block of about 3,300 acres on Buffalo Bayou, "about 8 miles above the city of Houston, known as the Pine Point league." There is information here on another sale to be held at San Felipe de Austin on June 22, and on a sale to be held at Bastrop on June 29. I do not find anything on Austin's estate in Barker's Life of Austin, and the only reference to the estate in the index to the first forty volumes of the Southwestern Historical Quarterly turns out to be a biography of Henry Austin, where (Vol. XXXVII, p. 207) there is a paragraph on Henry Austin's account, completed in 1837, of the land and empresario contracts of Stephen F. Austin. That seems to be primarily a list of the amount and location of lands received by each one of some 1,540 colonists. There is a brief reference to the tracts of lands in Austin's estate in a letter of J.F. Perry to Mirabeau B. Lamar of December 4, 1837, given in the Lamar Papers, Vol. I, p. 589.; Locations: TxU.



Reel: 3
Austin, Stephen Fuller. Estate.

[Report of the Legal Representatives, James F. Perry and Henry Austin, "of the Empressario [sic] Stephen F. Austin," made in accordance with the Senate Resolution of Oct. 18, 1836].

[Houston: Printed at the Telegraph Office]. [1837]

187; No copy located, but presented to the Senate by Albert C. Horton, chairman of the Committee on Public Lands, Nov. 3, 1837, and 100 copies ordered printed. It was also ordered to be printed in the Telegraph.



Reel: 2
Austin, William Tennant, 1809-1874.

Notice.


[Brazoria: Printed by D.W. Anthony]. [1833]

36; [Text begins:] The public are hereby informed, that the copartnership heretofore existing between A.G. Reynolds and the undersigned, under the firm of Reynolds & Austin, is this day discontinued, and the arrangement and settlement of the concern taken into the hands of the subscriber ... [Signed and dated at end:] Wm. T. Austin. Brazoria, April 25, 1833.; Broadside. 17.1 x 18.9 cm.; The formation of this partnership to sell "Desirable Goods" and buy "Hides, Peltry, Furs, Cotton and Pecans" was announced in the Constitutional Advocate and Texas Public Advertiser for November 14, 1832 (unique copy in my collection), and this notice of dissolution in substantially the same form appeared in the Advocate for May 11, 1833. In the same issue Reynolds has a notice referring to the Austin Notice in which he claims that the Austin statement is erroneous and that "the copartnership heretofore existing is still in existence." Austin arrived in Texas in October, 1830, and joined his elder brother, John Austin, in the latter's various business enterprises. The article on him in the Handbook of Texas does not mention this partnership with Reynolds, but says that "in 1833 his brother, wife, and daughter died of cholera, and a flood on the Brazos washed away his business." I find no record of Reynolds.; Locations: TWS.



Reel: 1
Austin. Citizens.

[Nullification on Our Own Hook].

[Austin]. [1842]

500; No copy located, but a circular with this title was issued by a meeting of Austin residents who opposed the removal of the archives, according to Smithwick's The Evolution of a State, Austin [1900], at p. 279.



Reel: 8
Austin. Committee of Vigilance.

To Arms! To Arms! Texians!! Arrangements entered into by the Citizens of Austin, with reference to the approach of the Mexicans; and the latest information from the West of the Invading Army.

[Austin: Printed at the Austin City Gazette Office]. [1842]

501; [Dated at foot of second column:] ; Broadside in two columns. 31.1 x 19.4 cm.; This gives a report dated, "Sunday Evening, 5th [i.e., 6th] March, 1842." of the arrival of a Mexican force before San Antonio, which, under a white flag, had demanded the surrender of the town. Reply was promised at two o'clock in the afternoon, but as no reinforcements were in sight the town then surrendered, on Saturday, March 5. At the end of this report is an entry headed, "Monday Morning, 6 o'clock," saying, "An express has just arrived, with information that Goliad has fallen; but no particulars." There is also a proclamation by Asa Brigham, Mayor, appointing a Committee of Vigilence [sic], of which Major Samuel Whiting was chairman, and a report of a meeting of the Committee held on the evening of the sixth. One of the votes of this meeting was that all families in the city should "leave as soon as possible for a safer section of the country." John Henry Brown, the historian, was, as a young soldier, with the small Texas force at San Antonio just before the town's surrender. He gives a vivid account of the events of around that time in his History of Texas (Vol. II, p. 211 and following), but erroneously states the date of the surrender as March 6. For later reports of the capture of San Antonio see entry Nos. 502 and 508.; Locations: Tx-LO.


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