Texas as a Province and Republic 1795-1845 Author Index



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Austin, Stephen Fuller.

... Map of Texas with Parts of the Adjoining States … 1839.

See entry No. 1115E.
Austin, Stephen Fuller.

A Sketch of the map ... showing the location of the City of Houston … [n.d.].

See 1836, Houston (city) Map, entry No. 1208, note.
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

[Brazoria: Printed at the Office of the Advocate of the People's Rights]. [1833]

35; [Letter, dated "City of Mexico, July 24, 1833.", addressed "To the Central Committee", and signed, Stephen F. Austin preceded by two paragraphs of editorial comment with heading:] Brazoria, October 26, 1833; Broadside in two columns. 45.5 x 29 cm.; Austin first tells of his journey since leaving Texas early in May to present the petition of the April, 1833, convention for statehood, and then in some detail of his interview with two members of the Mexican cabinet on July 23, and states that he thinks the government will "before long" approve of making Texas a separate state. He goes on to recommend that if this is refused "Texas ought to organize a local government with as little delay as possible." It was this sentiment, but more fully and forcibly expressed, in Austin's letter of October 2, 1833, to the ayuntamiento of Bexar, which led to his arrest when about to leave Mexico early in 1834. There does not seem to have been any contemporary printing of the October 2 letter. Since, as noted in the "Sketch of Printing", [located in Collection Information] the press on which this broadside was printed was financed by John A. Wharton, we can probably ascribe to him the favorable editorial comment preceding the text of Austin's letter for its "openly renouncing the policy and doctrine of 'Conciliation.'" The letter is reprinted in full in the Austin Papers, Vol. II, p. 988-991, where it is stated in the note to be, "From a handbill printed at Brazoria, Oct. 3 [i.e. October 26?], 1833. Texas State Library." That copy cannot now be found.; Locations: TxU.

Reel: 1
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

[Brazoria: Printed by Gray & Harris]. [1834]

43; [Letter to James F. Perry, dated "Prison of the Acordada City of Mexico 25 Aug. 1834"]; [Broadside.]; We know from a letter of James F. Perry to Austin dated "Peach Point 7th Decr. 1834" (Austin Papers, Vol. III, p. 33) that this long and interesting letter of August 25 "has been widely circulated, both in the paper and handbills," but no copy of a separate printing seems to have survived. For a card of W.H. Wharton dated November 9, 1834, bitterly attacking Austin for statements in his August 25 letter imputing that Wharton had aggravated Austin's misfortunes, see entry No. 51. No copy of this August 25 letter has been located, but it is given in full in the Austin Papers, Vol. II, p. 1075-1085. Edward, in his History of Texas, gives the text of the letter, but with many omissions, p. 211-220.

Reel: 1
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

[New Orleans]. [1821]

1082; [Printed form of permit authorizing individuals to settle in Austin's Colony, reading:] By Stephen F. Austin, Civil Commandant of the Colony forming on the Colorado and Brassos Rivers, in the Province of Texas:-- Permission is hereby granted to ----- to emigrate and settle in the Colony forming by me, under the authority and protection of New Spain, at the points above stated. Said ----- required to comply with the general regulations hereunto annexed: General Regulations relative to the Colony. [Five regulations.]; Broadside. 25 x 20 cm.; This permit, the text of which is well known from its reprinting in the Austin Papers, Part I, page 435, is a choice bit of Texana for it seems to be the first separate piece of printing relating to Austin's colony. It was issued by Austin shortly after his return to Louisiana from his survey of Texas in the summer of 1821. It is an important document, giving as it does the terms under which colonists would be admitted by Austin. A few days afterwards Austin began his return journey to Texas, where at San Antonio, he learned that he must go to Mexico to get his grant confirmed.; Locations: TxU. TWS.

Reel: 19
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

[San Felipe de Austin: Printed at the Mexican Citizen Office?]. [1831]

20; [Form of certificate that a given person is admitted by Austin into his colony as a colonist, to be used as a safe conduct. Text begins:] El Ciudadano Estevan F. Austin, Empresario, para introducir Emigrados Estrangeros, en las Colonias ... Certifico ... [At end:] Villa de Austin, ----- de ----- de 183-; Broadside. 25.2 x 20.2 cm.; Though this certificate is a form, it has seemed important enough to justify an entry. By skillful negotiations, Austin had obtained rulings from the Mexican authorities excepting persons going to his or to the De Witt colony from the prohibitions of the famous law of April 6, 1830, against entry into Texas. The difficulties in making it clear that such and such persons were destined for these colonies were finally solved by Austin, who, when on his way to attendance at a session of Congress in Coahuila, wrote from Bexar to his secretary, S.M. Williams, on December 28, 1830 (Austin Papers, Vol. II, p. 567-569). "I send you two hundred signatures, have certificates printed over them verbatim like the others, and fill them up, all except the name." In the same letter Austin says: "I have written to De Witt to get 200 certificates of the same kind as mine printed and signed by him and sent in blank to different places." The certificate entered here is almost certainly one of those which Williams had printed over Austin's signature. It recites that the person named is on his way to Austin's colony and is given the certificate so that he will not be embarrassed by the action of Mexican officials in his journey. Dr. Barker in his Life of Austin devotes p. 319-320 to an interesting account of these certificates. The form of certificate described in Austin's letter of November 13, 1830, to M.B. Menard (Austin Papers, Vol. II, p. 535-537) was almost certainly not printed. As it is unlikely that Austin's letter dated from Bexar on December 28, 1830, reached San Felipe and was acted on by Cotten by the time, on or before January 15, 1831, he had sold his Texas Gazette press to the printers of the Mexican Citizen. I have supplied the imprint of the latter to this piece.; Locations: Tx-LO. TxGR. TxU.

Reel: 1
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

[San Felipe de Austin: Printed by G.B. Cotten]. [1829]

10; [Form of promissory note reading in full:] $50.00 San Felipe de Austin, ----- Having been received by S.F. Austin, as one of the Settlers under his contracts with Government, in conformity with the terms published by him, 20th November, 1829; --I promise to pay to said S.F. Austin, or order, the sum of Fifty Dollars, in two payments, that is to say: Ten Dollars on receipt of my title for land as a Settler, under said contracts, and Forty Dollars, one year after the date of said title; to bear interest at the customary rates of this Colony, from the time it becomes due until paid; which payment I promise to make without defalcation; and I hereby renounce all the benefits, exemptions, and privileges of the laws, which I might use to retard or evade the prompt payment of said sums; and I execute this note in this language, because I do not understand Spanish. Witness. -----; Broadside. 7.5 x 19.8 cm.; Delivery of this promissory note was the fourth of the steps, outlined in the note to entry No. 9, taken by an immigrant in acquiring land in Texas. This form for a promissory note follows the terms outlined in Austin's Notice of November 20, 1829, entry No. 11. Austin, after having had Cotten print for him on November 20 the Notice and the certificates of admission, had these forms for a promissory note printed on November 30. Cotten's charge was $5, the number printed not being stated. These forms for notes were apparently reprinted from time to time as the copy in my collection, with the filled-in date of September 27, 1830, differs slightly in capitalization and punctuation from the copy of the first printing in the Austin Papers at the University of Texas, with the filled-in date December 2, 1829, from which the above entry is made.; Locations: TxSaA. TxU. TWS.

Reel: 1
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

[San Felipe de Austin: Printed by G.B. Cotten]. [1829]



9; [Form of certificate that a given person is admitted by Austin into his colony as a colonist, to be presented to the commissioner charged with issuing titles as proof of that fact. Text begins:] No.--El Ciudadano Estevan F. Austin, Empresario, para introducir Emigrados Estrangeros, en las Colonias ... Certifico, Que ----- es uno de los Colonos, que he introducido en virtud de mis contratos antes mencionados; que llego en esta Colonia el dia ----- del mes de -----, de año de 18--; ... Quedara nulo este documento, si el interesado no se presenta al dicho Comisionado con este, dentro de un mes, despues de publicarse en esta, un aviso publico al efecto;... [At end:] Villa de Austin, ----- de ----- de 18--; Broadside. 24.5 x 20 cm.; Among the 1829 and early 1830 products of the San Felipe press are printed forms for some of the steps in the process of making grants of land to immigrants. I do not ordinarily list forms, but as these grants were the foundation of the colonization of Texas, it seems suitable that the four essential printed forms used in the colonization process should be entered or noted here, with some of their variations listed in the notes. The steps to be taken by an immigrant are outlined clearly and specifically in Austin's Notice of November 20, 1829, entry No. 11. They were four in number. The first was the filing of a petition to be admitted as a colonist. The information required to be included in such a petition is outlined in the Notice just referred to. Cotten's printing bill (Austin Papers, Vol. II, p. 562-563), under date of January 15, 1830, has a charge for printing "25 Petns." However, no copy of any of these petitions has been located. The next step was the delivery by the empresario or his agent to the immigrant of a certificate to be presented by the latter to the commissioner charged with issuing titles, stating that the immigrant had been admitted as a colonist. The present entry for such a certificate is discussed later in this note. The third step was the delivery to the colonist by a commissioner of an original and certified copy of a deed, the original to be filed at the Land Office and the certified copy to be kept by the grantee. Entry No. 13 is for forms printed in 1829 for deeds for Juan Antonio Padilla to fill out as Comisionado General. Deeds by commissioners for individual colonies are referred to in the note to the entry for the Padilla deeds. The fourth and final form, entry No. 10, is for the promissory note to be signed by the colonist on receiving his deed. The present entry for a certificate of admission, representing the second step in the procedure of obtaining land, is from a form filled in on December 23, 1829. At the end of the certificate are five lines to the effect that the certificate will not be valid if not presented within a month after public notice by the commissioner to that effect, or should it appear that the statements in the petition were false in any respect, or that the conditions in the notice of November 20, 1829, had not been complied with. The first charge for these is on Cotten's printing bill against Austin for the years 1829 and 1830, given in the Austin Papers, Vol. II, p. 562-563. An original certificate of admission in my collection, filled out by Samuel M. Williams for "Empresario Austin" Papers, Vol. II, p. 562-563. An original certificate of admission in my collection, filled out by Samuel M. Williams for "Empresario Austin" on June 2, 1831, is practically identical with the one entered here, except that the printed part of the date reads "183-" instead of "18-." There is a slightly shorter but quite similar printed form of certificate of admission into De Witt's colony in the General Land Office of Texas in Book 13, "Titles De Witt's Contract for 400 Families." This has the printed address, Villa de Gonzalez, and is signed in manuscript by Green De Witt, with the date January 25, 1830, filled in. There is a form for Wavell's colony lacking the warning in the last five lines of the Austin certificate. This is in the Milam Papers at the University of Texas with the address given as "my [sic] oficina dentro de la Colonia de Wavell." This is signed in manuscript by Ben. R. Milam, with the date January 19, 1831, filled in. Also in the Land Office is a certificate of admission into Austin and Williams' colony. This is much shorter than the earlier certificates. That has the printed address, Tenoxtitlan, and is signed in manuscript, "Spencer H. Jack Agente," with the date June 3, 1834, filled in. For an account of what little is known of Godwin Brown Cotten see the "Sketch of Printing" [located in Collection Information].; Locations: Tx. Tx-LO. TxGR. TxH. TxSaA. TWS.

Reel: 1
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

An Address delivered by S.F. Austin of Texas, to a Very Large Audience of Ladies and Gentlemen in the Second Presbyterian Church, Louisville, Kentucky, on the 7th of March, 1836.

Lexington: J. Clarke & Co. Printers. 1836

1181; Blank leaf, 30 p. 18 cm. Printed paper wrappers. Wrapper title same. This Louisville address of Austin, delivered while on his way to Washington as one of the three commissioners of Texas, says that Texas had forborne from taking up arms against Mexico until "further submission on our part would have been both ruinous and degrading," and that the object of Texas was "freedom" to be obtained by becoming "a new republic or by becoming a State of the United States." Austin gives in full the declaration of November 7th, 1835, upholding the Federal system of government as outlined in the constitution of 1824, not knowing that Texas had proclaimed her Declaration of Independence only a few days before. The address was printed in the Kentucky Gazette of April 9. It was reprinted in the Wharton Address, New York, 1836 (entry No. 1260), and there is a separate in the University of Texas Library and also the Boston Public Library, made up of pages [29]-47 of the Wharton pamphlet. This separate has the following words in Austin's handwriting at the top of page [29]: "Corrected copy for Mrs. Holley." Mrs. Holley had added a paragraph in her own hand as an introduction to the Address, and there are six pages of manuscript in her handwriting at the end of the Address, in which she traces the movements of the Commissioners and the events in Texas after San Jacinto. It has the appearance of being an unused chapter of her Texas.; Rader 212. Sabin 2426.; Locations: CtY. DLC. MH. TxGR. TxU. TWS. Also other libraries.



Reel: 24
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

[Arms of Republic of Mexico].

Published by H.S. Tanner Philadelphia. Engraved by John & Wm. W. Warr Philada [At lower left, below neat line:] by H.S. Tanner of the State of Pennsylvania. March 17, 1830

1115; Map of Texas with Parts of the Adjoining States Compiled by Stephen F. Austin [At lower right, just above neat line:] Note [four lines].; 74 x 60 cm. Boundaries and border of map colored. Graphic scale: about 24 miles to the inch. Prime meridians: Greenwich and Washington. Note below title reads: The Latitude and Longitude of Saltillo Monterey Laredo Bexar Nacogdoches and the Point where the boundary line leaves the Sabine are from the observations of General Teran of the Mexican Army. Inset of text in lower left corner. Folded to height 14 cm., in red roan covers tooled in gilt, with title stamped in gilt on front cover: Texas; This is one of the great Texas maps, showing as it does for the first time and on a large scale and partly in colors the results of the beginning of emigration into Texas from the United States. The large scale is made possible by fixing the western boundary of the map at a little west of the 102d meridian or about 225 miles west of Bexar, and the northern boundary at the Red River. West of the 100th meridian and north of the Red River is shown as part of New Mexico. The limited extent of settlement in Texas at the end of the year 1829 is shown by the fact that Waco Village is the most northern settlement on the Brazos, with no town, except Matagorda, shown on the Colorado, and Gonzales the most western settlement on the Guadalupe. The date is shown only by the copyright notice. Here for the first time on a printed map, as far as I have noticed, are located the new towns of San Felipe de Austin, Harrisburg, Brazoria, Matagorda, Waco Village, Victoria, and Gonsales [sic]. As in previous maps, the old settlements of Bexar, Goliad and Nacogdoches are shown. Austin's Colony, DeWitt's Colony, and the grant to Austin in 1827 north of the Bexar-Nacogdoches road are shown with their boundaries in color. The mouth of the Sabine is shown with approximate correctness at about 93 [degrees] 50', with the mouth of the Rio Grande at about 96 [degrees] 25', or nearly a degree too far east. The Nueces is shown as the south boundary of Texas.; Phillips, Maps, p. 841.; Locations: CSmH. DLC. PHi. PPM. TxGR (fragile). TxHSJM. TxU. Graff. TWS.



Reel: 21
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

[Arms of Republic of Mexico].

Published by H.S. Tanner Philadelphia. Engraved by John & Wm. W. Warr Philada [At lower left, below neat line:] by H.S. Tanner of the State of Pennsylvania. 1833

1115A; Another edition [of entry No. 1115], from same plate and with same boundaries as the first edition of 1830, with date 1833 added at the end of the "Note" below the title, with same title, imprint, engravers, scale, inset, and prime meridians, but no copyright notice. As noted in the collation, this edition seems to be identical, except for the date, with that for 1830.; Locations: CU-B. Tx.



Reel: 21
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

[Arms of Republic of Mexico].

Published by H.S. Tanner Philadelphia. Engraved by John & Wm. W. Warr Philada [At lower left, below neat line:] by H.S. Tanner of the State of Pennsylvania. 1834

1115B; Another edition [of entry No. 1115] with date 1834 added at the end of the "Note" below the title, with same title, imprint, engravers, scale, and prime meridians, but with new copyright notice dated 1834, additional grants shown, and additional text at lower left stating the number of families to be located at the various grants. The additional grants shown on the map include grants to Cameron, Felisola [sic], Burnet, Whelin, Zavala, Austin & Williams, Woodbury, McMullen & McGlone.; Locations: Morrow.



Reel: 21
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

[Arms of Republic of Mexico].

Published by H.S. Tanner Philadelphia. Engraved by John & Wm. W. Warr Philada [At lower left, below neat line:] by H.S. Tanner of the State of Pennsylvania. 1835

1115C; Another edition [of entry No. 1115], with date 1835 added at the end of the "Note" below the title, otherwise with same title, imprint, inscription of engravers, scale, and prime meridians, but with new copyright notice, also dated 1835, various additional grants indicated, and new section of text stating the number of families to be located at the various grants shown on the map, added in lower left corner. In blue roan covers with title stamped in gilt on front cover: Texas. Here much of Texas is shown as parcelled out in various grants, with their boundaries defined. As north of the Red River and west of the 100th meridian is shown as part of New Mexico, none of the grants in what is now the Texas Panhandle are shown. These are shown in the Hooker map in Mrs. Holley's Texas, Baltimore, 1833 (entry No. 1135). There are several new towns not on the Austin 1830 map, but all of these, except St. Patrick on the Nueces, are given in the map in Mrs. Holley's Texas.; Raines, p. 250.; Locations: CSmH. CU-B. CtY. MnHi. TxU. TWS.



Reel: 21
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

[Arms of Republic of Mexico].

Published by H.S. Tanner Philadelphia. Engraved by John & Wm. W. Warr Philada [At lower left, below neat line:] by H.S. Tanner of the State of Pennsylvania. 1836

1115D; Another edition [of entry No. 1115] with the date 1836, but with same title, imprint, inscription of engravers, scale, prime meridians and copyright dated 1835. Inset of text as in 1835 edition. In black roan covers with title stamped in gilt on front cover: Texas.; Phillips, Maps, p. 841.; Locations: DLC. Tx. BM. TWS.



Reel: 21
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

[Arms of Republic of Mexico].

Published by H.S. Tanner Philadelphia. Engraved by John & Wm. W. Warr Philada [At lower left, below neat line:] by H.S. Tanner of the State of Pennsylvania. 1837

1115E; Another edition [of entry No. 1115] with the date 1837, but with same title, imprint, inscription of engravers, scale, prime meridians and copyright dated 1835. Inset of text as in 1835 edition.; Locations: DLC. ICN.



Reel: 21
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

[Arms of Republic of Mexico].

Published by H.S. Tanner Philadelphia. Engraved by John & Wm. W. Warr Philada [At lower left, below neat line:] by H.S. Tanner of the State of Pennsylvania. 1839

1115F; Another edition [of entry No. 1115] with the date 1839, and with counties indicated, in solid color, but with same title, imprint, inscription of engravers, scale, prime meridians, and copyright dated 1835. Inset of text as in 1835 edition. In dark green roan covers with title stamped in gilt on front cover: Texas; The 1836 Austin map shows the grants as before with some place names added, the most important being Galveston and Velasco. The grants in this 1839 edition are still shown as in the 1837 map, where the only new location noticed was Fort Alamo. In the 1839 map the sub-divisions shown in color are counties instead of grants, though the names of the grants are still on the map. Houston is shown for the first time on an Austin map, and also Port Preston on Aransaso Bay, a little east of the mouth of Mission River. Mission Refugio is no longer shown on the north side of that river, but Refugio is shown on its south side as its mouth. For edition of this map dated 1840, see Moore's Map and Description of Texas, Philadelphia, 1840 (entry No. 1363), where it accompanies the book.; Phillips, Maps, p. 842.; Locations: DLC (in Tanner 1839 Atlas). TWS.; B. See [Burnet, David Gouverneur], entry No. 1116.



Reel: 21
Austin, Stephen Fuller, 1793-1836.

Dinner to Colonel Austin.

[Brazoria: Printed by F.C. Gray]. [1835]

56; [Text begins:] A public Dinner and Ball were given by the citizens of Brazoria on Tuesday 8th of September inst. [1835] to Col. Stephen F. Austin, on the occasion of his arrival from Mexico ... We hasten to lay before our fellow citizens the remarks of Col. Austin ...; Broadside in four columns. 31.3 x 39.2 cm.; When Austin landed at Velasco on September 1, 1835, after an absence of more than two years in Mexico, the great question agitating the Texans was whether to go ahead with the Consultation called for October 15. San Felipe was now controlled by the peace party, so called, which had opposed the meeting and had forbidden the election of delegates. All hung on what Austin would say at this public dinner in his honor on September 8. As Dr. Barker says in his Mexico and Texas, 1821-1835, Dallas [1928], p. 141: "If he approved the Consultation, elections would go forward with no further doubts; if he opposed, the plan would certainly fail, and would probably be abandoned. He had peace or war in his hands and the vast majority of the people would unquestionably accept what he gave." Austin came out unequivocably for the Consultation and ended his address with this toast, "The constitutional rights and the security and peace of Texas, they ought to be maintained; and jeopardized as they now are, they demand a general consultation of the people." Henry Austin's account of the dinner in a letter from Brazoria, dated September 10, 1835, to his sister, Mrs. Holly, is worth quoting (Austin Papers, Vol. III, p. 120): "A Grand Dinner and Ball were got up for the occasion on two days notice ... the only thing I did not like was 7$ a head for ball and supper ... There were 60 covers and despite the short notice the table was three times filled by men alone. In the evening the long room was filled to a Jam at least 60 or 80 ladies who danced the sun up and the Oyster Creek girls would not have quit then had not the room been wanted for breakfast--you never saw such enthusiasm." This famous speech of Austin's to which, says Foote (Texas and the Texans, Vol. II, p. 60), "more than a thousand Anglo-Americans listened ... for nearly an hour with unbroken delight" has been often reprinted. (Austin Papers, Vol. III, p. 116-119; Barker's Readings in Texas History, p. 209-212; Foote, as above, p. 60-65; Johnson and Barker, Texas and Texans, Vol. I, p. 258-261.); Locations: CU-B. TxU. TWS.


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