Texas as a Province and Republic 1795-1845 Author Index



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Reel: 16
Arrowsmith, Aaron, 1750-1823.

Mapa del Nuevo Mexico, Texas y Luisiana, y curso de los Rios Misouri, Missisippi, &a.

London. Published by Arrowsmith 10 Soho Square. 5 October 1810

1045; 67 x 82 cm. Boundaries colored.; This has been entered from a copy described in Torres Lanzas, Relacion Descriptiva de los Mapas, Planos, &, de Mexico y Floridas Existentes en el Archivo General de Indias, Sevilla, 1900, No. 502.; Locations: Archivo General de Indias, Seville.



Reel: 16
Arrowsmith, Aaron, 1750-1823.

A New Map of Mexico and Adjacent Provinces Compiled from Original Documents by A. Arrowsmith 1810.

London. Published by A. Arrowsmith 10 Soho Sque Hydrographer to His Majesty. Engraved by E. Jones. 5th October 1810

1046; 129 x 158 cm. Boundaries colored. No graphic scale, but about 38 miles to the inch. Insets: Valley of Mexico, from Mr Humboldt's Map. [On southwestern sheet.]; Veracruz; Acapulco [Both on southwestern sheet.]; Printed on four sheets, the main imprint on the southeastern sheet following the title and brief imprints at the foot of the other sheets. Found in Arrowsmith's Atlas to Thompson's Alcedo, London, 1816, Nos. VIII-XI and as a separate.; Phillips, Maps, p. 408.; This map, extending from the 15th parallel north to the 42nd, and from a little east of the Mississippi to the Pacific, covers on a larger scale about the same area as Humboldt's Carte Générale Nouvelle Espagne, Paris, [1809] (entry No. 1042). The note to the Carte Générale discusses Humboldt's charges that Arrowsmith in this map copied, without credit, from it and points out that these charges applied to the Mexican portion of the Carte Générale and that in its representation of Texas the Arrowsmith map, published as it was six years after the Carte Générale had been substantially completed, was a considerable improvement on the Humboldt map. The two 1810 editions of the Arrowsmith map vary considerably in the colored boundaries of Texas, though the place names and locations seem the same. In the "Hydrographer to the King" edition, the eastern boundary is shown in colors, first from the mouth of the Salinas, i.e. the Sabine, to the Red River, which is shown as the northern boundary, then to about 98 [degrees] 20'. It then runs more or less southwest and includes the village of San Saba in Texas. In the "Prince of Wales" edition, the eastern boundary follows Humboldt and begins about a hundred miles east of the mouth of the Salinas, or well into Louisiana, at the mouth of what is called the Mermento River, and then runs northeast along that river and then northwest to only a little above the 32d parallel, and then runs slightly south of west, with San Saba around 100 miles beyond the boundary. The "Additions to 1817" of the "Prince of Wales" edition (entry No. 1046D) seems to be identical, as far as Texas is concerned, with the original "Prince of Wales" edition (entry No. 1046A). There is an article on Arrowsmith in the Dictionary of National Biography. His sons, Aaron and Samuel, carried on the business after their father's death.; Locations: CSmH. CU-B (in atlas). DLC. ICN. MH. MiU. NNA. BM. Royal Geographic Society. TWS.



Reel: 16
Arrowsmith, Aaron, 1750-1823.

A New Map of Mexico and Adjacent Provinces Compiled from Original Documents by A. Arrowsmith 1810.

London. Published by A. Arrowsmith 10 Soho Sque Hydrographer to His Majesty. Engraved by E. Jones. 5th October 1810

1046A; Another edition [of entry No. 1046], with same title, but Arrowsmith is described in the imprint as "Hydrographer to H.R.H. the Prince of Wales." Published as a separate, no copy of this edition having been found either bound up in Arrowsmith's Atlas to Thompson's Alcedo, or with the four sheets numbered on the back VIII-XI, indicating that it was once bound in a copy of the Atlas. It is printed on paper with watermark: J. Whatman 1811.; This map, extending from the 15th parallel north to the 42nd, and from a little east of the Mississippi to the Pacific, covers on a larger scale about the same area as Humboldt's Carte Générale Nouvelle Espagne, Paris, [1809] (entry No. 1042). The note to the Carte Générale discusses Humboldt's charges that Arrowsmith in this map copied, without credit, from it and points out that these charges applied to the Mexican portion of the Carte Générale and that in its representation of Texas the Arrowsmith map, published as it was six years after the Carte Générale had been substantially completed, was a considerable improvement on the Humboldt map. The two 1810 editions of the Arrowsmith map vary considerably in the colored boundaries of Texas, though the place names and locations seem the same. In the "Hydrographer to the King" edition, the eastern boundary is shown in colors, first from the mouth of the Salinas, i.e. the Sabine, to the Red River, which is shown as the northern boundary, then to about 98 [degrees] 20'. It then runs more or less southwest and includes the village of San Saba in Texas. In the "Prince of Wales" edition, the eastern boundary follows Humboldt and begins about a hundred miles east of the mouth of the Salinas, or well into Louisiana, at the mouth of what is called the Mermento River, and then runs northeast along that river and then northwest to only a little above the 32d parallel, and then runs slightly south of west, with San Saba around 100 miles beyond the boundary. The "Additions to 1817" of the "Prince of Wales" edition (entry No. 1046D) seems to be identical, as far as Texas is concerned, with the original "Prince of Wales" edition (entry No. 1046A). There is an article on Arrowsmith in the Dictionary of National Biography. His sons, Aaron and Samuel, carried on the business after their father's death.; Locations: MH. NNA. TWS.



Reel: 16
Arrowsmith, Aaron, 1750-1823.

A New Map of Mexico and Adjacent Provinces Compiled from Original Documents by A. Arrowsmith 1810, Additions to 1816.

London. Published by A. Arrowsmith 10 Soho Sque Hydrographer to His Majesty. Engraved by E. Jones. 5th October 1810

1046C; Another "Prince of Wales" edition [of entry No. 1046], with "Additions to 1816." added after the date in the title. Found in Arrowsmith's Atlas to Thompson's Alcedo, London, 1816, Nos. VIII-XI.; Phillips, Maps, p. 408.; This map, extending from the 15th parallel north to the 42nd, and from a little east of the Mississippi to the Pacific, covers on a larger scale about the same area as Humboldt's Carte Générale Nouvelle Espagne, Paris, [1809] (entry No. 1042). The note to the Carte Générale discusses Humboldt's charges that Arrowsmith in this map copied, without credit, from it and points out that these charges applied to the Mexican portion of the Carte Générale and that in its representation of Texas the Arrowsmith map, published as it was six years after the Carte Générale had been substantially completed, was a considerable improvement on the Humboldt map. The two 1810 editions of the Arrowsmith map vary considerably in the colored boundaries of Texas, though the place names and locations seem the same. In the "Hydrographer to the King" edition, the eastern boundary is shown in colors, first from the mouth of the Salinas, i.e. the Sabine, to the Red River, which is shown as the northern boundary, then to about 98 [degrees] 20'. It then runs more or less southwest and includes the village of San Saba in Texas. In the "Prince of Wales" edition, the eastern boundary follows Humboldt and begins about a hundred miles east of the mouth of the Salinas, or well into Louisiana, at the mouth of what is called the Mermento River, and then runs northeast along that river and then northwest to only a little above the 32d parallel, and then runs slightly south of west, with San Saba around 100 miles beyond the boundary. The "Additions to 1817" of the "Prince of Wales" edition (entry No. 1046D) seems to be identical, as far as Texas is concerned, with the original "Prince of Wales" edition (entry No. 1046A). There is an article on Arrowsmith in the Dictionary of National Biography. His sons, Aaron and Samuel, carried on the business after their father's death.; Locations: CSmH. DLC. ICN. MH.



Reel: 16
Arrowsmith, Aaron, 1750-1823.

A New Map of Mexico and Adjacent Provinces Compiled from Original Documents by A. Arrowsmith 1810. Additions to 1815.

London. Published by A. Arrowsmith 10 Soho Sque Hydrographer to His Majesty. Engraved by E. Jones. 5th October 1810

1046B; Another "Prince of Wales" edition [of entry No. 1046], with "Additions to 1815." added after the date in the title. Found in Arrowsmith's Atlas to Thompson's Alcedo, London, 1816, Nos. VIII-XI.; This map, extending from the 15th parallel north to the 42nd, and from a little east of the Mississippi to the Pacific, covers on a larger scale about the same area as Humboldt's Carte Générale Nouvelle Espagne, Paris, [1809] (entry No. 1042). The note to the Carte Générale discusses Humboldt's charges that Arrowsmith in this map copied, without credit, from it and points out that these charges applied to the Mexican portion of the Carte Générale and that in its representation of Texas the Arrowsmith map, published as it was six years after the Carte Générale had been substantially completed, was a considerable improvement on the Humboldt map. The two 1810 editions of the Arrowsmith map vary considerably in the colored boundaries of Texas, though the place names and locations seem the same. In the "Hydrographer to the King" edition, the eastern boundary is shown in colors, first from the mouth of the Salinas, i.e. the Sabine, to the Red River, which is shown as the northern boundary, then to about 98 [degrees] 20'. It then runs more or less southwest and includes the village of San Saba in Texas. In the "Prince of Wales" edition, the eastern boundary follows Humboldt and begins about a hundred miles east of the mouth of the Salinas, or well into Louisiana, at the mouth of what is called the Mermento River, and then runs northeast along that river and then northwest to only a little above the 32d parallel, and then runs slightly south of west, with San Saba around 100 miles beyond the boundary. The "Additions to 1817" of the "Prince of Wales" edition (entry No. 1046D) seems to be identical, as far as Texas is concerned, with the original "Prince of Wales" edition (entry No. 1046A). There is an article on Arrowsmith in the Dictionary of National Biography. His sons, Aaron and Samuel, carried on the business after their father's death.; Locations: DLC. ICN. MB. MiU-C. NNA.



Reel: 16
Arrowsmith, Aaron, 1750-1823.

A New Map of Mexico and Adjacent Provinces Compiled from Original Documents by A. Arrowsmith 1810. Additions to 1817.

London. Published by A. Arrowsmith 10 Soho Sque Hydrographer to His Majesty. Engraved by E. Jones. 5th October 1810

1046D; Another "Prince of Wales" edition [of entry No. 1046], with "Additions to 1817," added after the title.; This map, extending from the 15th parallel north to the 42nd, and from a little east of the Mississippi to the Pacific, covers on a larger scale about the same area as Humboldt's Carte Générale Nouvelle Espagne, Paris, [1809] (entry No. 1042). The note to the Carte Générale discusses Humboldt's charges that Arrowsmith in this map copied, without credit, from it and points out that these charges applied to the Mexican portion of the Carte Générale and that in its representation of Texas the Arrowsmith map, published as it was six years after the Carte Générale had been substantially completed, was a considerable improvement on the Humboldt map. The two 1810 editions of the Arrowsmith map vary considerably in the colored boundaries of Texas, though the place names and locations seem the same. In the "Hydrographer to the King" edition, the eastern boundary is shown in colors, first from the mouth of the Salinas, i.e. the Sabine, to the Red River, which is shown as the northern boundary, then to about 98 [degrees] 20'. It then runs more or less southwest and includes the village of San Saba in Texas. In the "Prince of Wales" edition, the eastern boundary follows Humboldt and begins about a hundred miles east of the mouth of the Salinas, or well into Louisiana, at the mouth of what is called the Mermento River, and then runs northeast along that river and then northwest to only a little above the 32d parallel, and then runs slightly south of west, with San Saba around 100 miles beyond the boundary. The "Additions to 1817" of the "Prince of Wales" edition (entry No. 1046D) seems to be identical, as far as Texas is concerned, with the original "Prince of Wales" edition (entry No. 1046A). There is an article on Arrowsmith in the Dictionary of National Biography. His sons, Aaron and Samuel, carried on the business after their father's death.; Locations: MiU-C.



Reel: 16
Arrowsmith, John.

Map of Texas, compiled from Surveys recorded in the Land Office of Texas … 1843.

See entry No. 1373A.
Arrowsmith, John, 1790-1873.

Map of Texas, compiled from Surveys recorded in the Land Office of Texas, and other Official Surveys.

[At foot, below neat line:] London, Pubd. by John Arrowsmith, 10 Soho Square. February 1841

1373; Soho Square, London. [Seals of the Republic of Texas and of the General Land Office.] Recognized as an Independent State by Great Britain 16th Novr 1840.; 61 x 50 cm. Boundaries colored. Thick paper. No graphic scale, but about 42 miles to the inch. Insets: [at lower right:] Plan of Galveston Bay from a M.S. [at lower left: Map showing relation of Texas to United States and Mexico]. Found in his London Atlas, London, J. Arrowsmith, [1832-1846], No. [43a].; These two maps, which show Texas to the Arkansas River in the north and to a little west of the Rio Grande in the west and which show Coahuila and Tamaulipas and Nuevo Leon below the Rio Grande to about the 25th parallel in the south, are the best and most useful for the Texas of their time. Thirty-one counties of Texas are shown. The Rio Grande, and not the Nueces, is shown as the southern boundary, and the Burr map of 1833 (entry No. 1134) is followed in showing the former Wilson and Exter grant in twelve sections. For what is now Oklahoma there are legends for "Route of the Ranger Colon Many 1833," "Route of the Dragons under Col. Dodge 1834," and "Elsworths Route." For Texas there are legends for "Presidio Road" from Presidio Rio Grande to San Antonio, for "Road from Bexar to Nacogdoches," "Route of General Rusk's Army," and "Waggon Rd to Santa Fe." No changes have been noted in the 1843 edition, except that it has various legends in light type not present in the 1841 edition, including (northwest of Austin) "Fisher & Comp" and west and southwest of San Antonio "Al Bourgeois d'Orvanne's Grant," "Mr. H. Castro," "Mr. Kennedy." The name of Kennedy is given on the Rio Grande opposite the Mexican towns of Dolores and Revilla, and of Castro near Laredo and Mier. The legend "Mr. Pierson" is given lower down the Rio Grande. These names indicate projected land holdings. In 1842, for example, Kennedy started proceedings to settle six hundred families south of the Nueces (entry No. 1385, note).; Phillips, Atlases, 764. Phillips, Maps, p. 843.; Locations: DLC. PPL. TxH. TxU. TxWB. BM. TWS.



Reel: 29
Arrowsmith, John, 1790-1873.

Map of Texas, compiled from Surveys recorded in the Land Office of Texas, and other Official Surveys.

London, Pubd by John Arrowsmith, 10 Soho Square. June, 8, 1843

1373A; Another edition [of entry No. 1373] with same title and insets; 62 x 50 cm. Boundaries colored. Thick paper. Graphic scale: about 42 miles to the inch. Found in his London Atlas, London, J. Arrowsmith, 1842 [-1850], No. [63]. These two maps, which show Texas to the Arkansas River in the north and to a little west of the Rio Grande in the west and which show Coahuila and Tamaulipas and Nuevo Leon below the Rio Grande to about the 25th parallel in the south, are the best and most useful for the Texas of their time. Thirty-one counties of Texas are shown. The Rio Grande, and not the Nueces, is shown as the southern boundary, and the Burr map of 1833 (entry No. 1134) is followed in showing the former Wilson and Exter grant in twelve sections. For what is now Oklahoma there are legends for "Route of the Ranger Colon Many 1833," "Route of the Dragons under Col. Dodge 1834," and "Elsworths Route." For Texas there are legends for "Presidio Road" from Presidio Rio Grande to San Antonio, for "Road from Bexar to Nacogdoches," "Route of General Rusk's Army," and "Waggon Rd to Santa Fe." No changes have been noted in the 1843 edition, except that it has various legends in light type not present in the 1841 edition, including (northwest of Austin) "Fisher & Comp" and west and southwest of San Antonio "Al Bourgeois d'Orvanne's Grant," "Mr. H. Castro," "Mr. Kennedy." The name of Kennedy is given on the Rio Grande opposite the Mexican towns of Dolores and Revilla, and of Castro near Laredo and Mier. The legend "Mr. Pierson" is given lower down the Rio Grande. These names indicate projected land holdings. In 1842, for example, Kennedy started proceedings to settle six hundred families south of the Nueces (entry No. 1385, note).; Phillips, Atlases, 789. Phillips, Maps, p. 843.; Locations: DLC. MH. TxWB. TWS.



Reel: 29
Austin City Gazette.

Austin City Gazette -- Extra.

[Austin: Printed at the Austin City Gazette Office]. [1842]

502; [Publishes proclamation of Geo. W. Hockley, Secretary of War and Navy, dated Austin, 7th March, 1842, beginning:] The force of the enemy at Bexar and Goliad is ascertained: it should not create alarm or panic. ... [Followed by:] Arrangements entered into by the Citizens of Austin, with reference to the approach of the Mexicans; and the latest information from the West of the Invading Army.; Broadside, Arrangements, etc., in double columns. 32 x 20 cm.; The proclamation of Hockley as Secretary of War and Navy is followed by a reprinting, from the same setting of type and under the heading "Arrangements," etc., of the text of entry No. 501, the March 7 broadside, To Arms! To Arms!, with the addition at the end of a bulletin headed, "Tuesday Evening, 7 o'clock," saying that the number of Mexicans "that crossed the Nueces does not exceed 750 men." Hockley (1802-1854), a friend of Houston's, followed him to Texas and was his chief of staff at San Jacinto and later his Secretary of War, appointed first in 1838 and again in December, 1841.; Locations: Tx.



Reel: 8
Austin City Gazette.

[Austin City Gazette, Extra, March 12].

[Austin: Printed at the Austin City Gazette Office]. [1842]

503; [Publishes proclamation of George W. Hockley, Secretary of War and Navy, dated Austin, 12th March, 1842, beginning: "The Mexicans have left Bexar, and have plundered it. They were evidently a marauding party, commanded by regular officers. ..."] No copy located, but the text of Hockley's proclamation was reprinted from this extra in the Telegraph of March 23, 1842.



Reel: 8
Austin City Gazette.

Austin City Gazette. -- Extra. ... City of Austin, October 29th, 1841.

Published by Samuel Whiting, Gazette Printing Office, Congress Avenue. ... City of Austin. 1841

435; [Includes the "Declaration of the Garrison of Jalisco to their Fellow-Citizens", and related documents translated for the Austin City Gazette, preceded by brief notices and editorial comment and followed by four advertisements.]; Broadsheet, both sides in four columns. 53.2 x 37.3 cm.; In this extra, the translations into English of the Jalisco declaration made in the summer of 1841 against the Bustamante administration of Mexican affairs is followed by translations of the Santa Anna manifestos of August 24, 1841, from Manga de Clavo and of September 2 and 8 from Perote. Other and less important supporting documents of Mexican officials are included.; Locations: NN. Tx.



Reel: 6
Austin Lyceum.

Constitution and By-Laws of the Austin Lyceum.

Austin: Printed at the Gazette Office. 1840

378; Instituted February 12, 1840. [One line, Latin quotation.]; 22 p. 16 cm.; It appears from the "Act to Establish and Incorporate the Austin Lyceum," approved February 4, 1841, Laws, Fifth Congress, p. 149-150, that it was organized "for the encouragement of literary and scientific pursuits." George W. Bonnell was one of the nine incorporators named in the act. On p. 21-22 is a list of the members.; Locations: TxU.



Reel: 6
Austin, Henry.

A Card.


[Galveston]. [1845]

615.1; Adjustment and Conveyancing. Henry Austin, Counsellor at Law has opened an office in Galveston City, for the adjustment of General and partial averages, and for the Conveyance of Land titles. ... Galveston City, July 4th, 1845. [Second column reads:] We have known Mr. Austin for some years, and state that we believe him to be fully competent, and well qualified to discharge the several duties he proposes to undertake ... Saml. M. Williams. James Love.; 4-page folder, text in double columns, printed on page [1].; There is an article on Henry Austin in the Handbook of Texas.; Locations: TxU.



Reel: 10
Austin, John, 1801-1833.

To the Public.

[Brazoria: Printed by D.W. Anthony]. [1832]

24; [A bitter attack on William H. Wharton who is charged with cowardice at the "battle of Velasco" and with falsely claiming that he "planned the whole attack at Fort Velasco." Text begins:] I am averse to troubling the public with individual difficulties, but it sometimes becomes necessary for one citizen, when attacked in a publication by another, to answer in the same manner. ... [Dated and signed at end:] Brazoria, Dec. 18, 1832. John Austin.; Broadside in two columns. 27 x 19 cm.; This broadside gives John Austin's reply to a handbill of the two Whartons, William and his younger brother John, entry No. 34, but no copy located, and of a handbill by Henry Smith and others dated December 16, 1832, entry No. 30, only copy located in my collection, both attacking John Austin. One of the charges, which sounds a little odd today, was that John Austin was a member of a faction headed by Stephen F. Austin. There is still another handbill in the dispute, entry No. 31, by Peyton R. Splane. John Austin joined the Long Expedition when a boy of eighteen and first got to know Stephen F. Austin when a prisoner in Mexico City. This ripened into a close friendship. Later John Austin became a successful merchant at Brazoria, a delegate to the convention of 1832, and a leader in the Battle of Velasco. William H. Wharton, who also lived on the lower Brazos, was a wealthy and prominent Texas lawyer and a leading figure with John Austin at the July, 1832, grand dinner at Brazoria in honor of Mexia, the representative of Santa Anna, then in successful revolt against the President of Mexico, Bustamante. For more about Wharton, see the note to his "Hand-Bill," entry No. 34. The chances are that John Austin's pride was severely wounded by the assertion of John A. Wharton that his brother, William H., "planned the whole attack at Velasco." The battle of handbills followed. John Austin died in the summer of 1833, a victim of the cholera epidemic. For what little is known of Anthony see the "Sketch of Printing" [located in Collection Information].; Locations: TWS.



Reel: 1
Austin, Stephen F.

Contestaciones Habidas entre … don Martin Perfecto de Cos y Don Estevan F. Austin … [Monclova? 1835?].

See entry No. 826.
Austin, Stephen Fuller.

... Map of Texas with Parts of the Adjoining States … 1835.

See entry No. 1115B.
Austin, Stephen Fuller.

... Map of Texas with Parts of the Adjoining States … 1836.

See entry No. 1115C.
Austin, Stephen Fuller.

... Map of Texas with Parts of the Adjoining States … 1837.

See entry No. 1115D.

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