Texas as a Province and Republic 1795-1845 Author Index



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The Anti-Texass [sic] Legion … Protest ... against the Texass Rebellion … 1845.

See entry No. 1473A.


An Appeal to the People of Massachusetts ... 1844.

See [Allen, George], entry No. 1469.


Archer, Branch Tanner, 1790-1856.

To the Editor of the Texas Republican.

[At end:] F.C. Gray, Printer, Brazoria. [1835]

54; [Text begins:] Sir: -- The following letter has been just received from W.H. Wharton, Esq. in answer to my annunciation of his election as Commissioner to the United States ... B.T. Archer. San Felipe, Dec. 2, 1835. [Followed by Wharton's letter declining the appointment, dated at beginning, San Felipe, November 28, 1835, and signed:] William H. Wharton.; Broadside in three columns. 35.8 x 26 cm.; See note to entry No. 55.; Locations: TxHSJM. TxU. TWS.



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Archer, Branch Tanner, 1790-1856.

To the Editors of the Telegraph.

[San Felipe de Austin: Printed by Baker & Bordens]. [1835]

55; [Text begins:] Gentlemen, I herewith transmit to you, for publication, a copy of an official letter which I addressed to Wm. H. Wharton, together with his answer. ... B.T. Archer. San Felipe, December 2, 1834 [i.e. 1835.] [Followed by notice of Archer to Wharton of his election as a commissioner to the United States, and by Wharton's letter of declination, dated at end, November 26, 1835.]; Broadside in three columns. 40 x 32.5 cm.; Wharton declined the appointment of the Consultation on the ground that its November Declaration in favor of the Mexican Constitution of 1824 was too indefinite to induce aid from foreign governments, and recommended that a new Convention be called with power to declare independence and form a constitution for Texas. Shortly afterwards he reconsidered and accepted. Wharton's letter of November 28 forwarded by Archer to the Texas Republican is somewhat longer and more carefully expressed than his November 26 letter published by the Telegraph, but in substance the two letters are the same. The earlier letter to the Telegraph is reprinted in the Austin Papers, Vol. III, p. 265-267. Archer was a member of the April, 1833, convention, president of the Consultation of 1835, one of the three commissioners to the United States, speaker of the Texas House of Representatives at the second session of the First Congress, and secretary of war under Lamar. He is the subject of a sketch by Dr. Barker in the Dictionary of American Biography.; Locations: TxU. TWS.



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Are you for or against Texas Annexation, [Detroit? 1844].

See Democratic Association, Washington, D.C., entry No. 1491D.


Arista, Mariano.

For his proclamation of January 9, 1842, see entry No. 978; and for his letter of March 12, 1842, see entry No. 977.


Arkansas (state). Governor, 1836-1840 (James Sevier Conway).

A Proclamation, by the Governor of the State of Arkansas.

[At foot:] Woodruff & Pew, Printers, Little Rock, Ark's. [1837]

1263; [Text begins:] Whereas, information having been conveyed to me, by the Sheriff of Miller county, that a portion of the inhabitants ... have determined to resist the collection of taxes ... [on the ground] that that county is not a portion of the State of Arkansas, but belongs to the Province of Texas, or the Republic of Mexico ... Now, therefore, I ... do hereby warn all and enjoin every of the citizens of Miller country ... to submit immediately and peaceably to the assessment and payment of the taxes levied .. or I shall at once provide a military force sufficient to enable the Sheriff to perform his duty. ... [Dated at Little Rock, March 2, 1837, and signed, J.S. Conway. Followed by another notice of the same date, also signed by Conway, relating to persons in the county who had received commissions from the state of Arkansas.]; Broadside. 48 x 28 cm.; Miller County, Arkansas, organized by an act of the Arkansas Territorial Legislature passed April 1, 1820, was thought in 1837 by the Arkansas authorities to extend more than sixty miles or so west of the present Texas-Arkansas north and south boundary. This region, later a part of Red River County, Texas, was for some time represented in both the Texas and Arkansas legislatures. The claim of Arkansas to this strip probably originated from the Burr map of 1833 (entry No. 1134), or other maps of the time, which incorrectly started the north and south boundary between Arkansas and Texas as beginning not at the intersection of the Sabine River and the 32d parallel, but at a higher point on the river a half a degree or so west of the actual boundary fixed by the Treaty of 1819. Other maps falling into the same error are mentioned in the note to the Burr map. The north-south boundary between Texas and Arkansas was finally determined in 1840 by the Joint Commission of the United States and Texas. For the maps agreed on by the Joint Commission and its report see United States, Department of State, 1842 (entry Nos. 1432, 1432A).; Allen, Arkansas Imprints 50.; Locations: DNA.



Reel: 25
Arkansas and Texas Land Company.

[New York]. [1831]

1118; [Engraved form of certificate of ownership of land in the company's grants, the boundaries of which are described. Text begins:] No. ----- This certifies that ----- of ----- is entitled to the right and benefit of Four Sitios of Land ... [Dated at end in print:] New-York, April 27, 1831. [Blanks for signatures of "Trustees" and "Clerk."]; Broadside. 31 x 19 cm.; This certificate instead of stating it gives the holder the right to locate, as in the Galveston Bay and Texas Land Company certificate of October 16, 1830 (entry No. 1117), makes a more unqualified statement of ownership as shown by the entry. My copy is signed in manuscript by T.L. Ogden, Daniel Jackson, and Edward Curtis as trustees, and by James S. Huggins as clerk, and is made out in the name of John Enrico. The text of this certificate, except for omission of "Four" before sitios as above, is given at page 42 of Documents, entry for which follows.; Locations: TWS.

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Arkansas and Texas Land Company.

Documents relating to Grants of Lands, made to Don Estevan Julian Willson [sic] and Don Richard Exter, in Texas.



New-York: Ludwig & Tolefree, Printers, Corner of Greenwich & Vesey-streets. 1831

1119; Leaf of title, verso blank; Officers Names, 1 leaf, verso blank; [3]-48 p. 21 cm.; The Arkansas and Texas Land Company was organized by John Charles Beales in April, 1831, only a few months after the organization of the Galveston Bay and Texas Land Company (see entry No. 1123). Its two grants were located in the Texas Panhandle and beyond, and are known in Texas history as the Wilson and Exter grants. Eugene Barker in his Life of Stephen 1. Austin refers (p. 298-300) to a fraudulent offering of stock in July, 1829, by a broker, one Dennis A. Smith of Baltimore, based on these two grants. This of course was before Beales became interested in the grants through his marriage to Exter's widow. The bounds of the first grant made to Wilson on May 27, 1826, included land in Texas and four other states. In Texas, all the Texas Panhandle west of the 102d meridian was included. Amarillo is a little east of that meridian. Its boundary on the south was the 32d parallel from its intersection with the 102d meridian, a point not far from present day Midland, Texas, west to the then boundary between the Mexican states of Texas and New Mexico. That boundary was the west boundary of the grant, and the north boundary a line twenty leagues, say sixty miles, south of the Arkansas River, running to the 102d meridian or east boundary. These boundaries include Cimarron County, Oklahoma; a narrow strip along part of the west boundary of Kansas; several counties in Colorado, and a fairly wide strip along the eastern boundary of New Mexico. See note to next entry for contemporary maps showing these boundaries. The second grant was made to Wilson and Exter on September 23, 1828. It extended the east and west boundaries of the first grant north to the Arkansas River and was one of the so-called "Twenty League Boundary Grants." The legal setup of the company as shown by its Articles of Association and Deed of Trust (p. 33-48) is difficult to figure out, there being no provision for capital stock as was the case with the Galveston Bay and Texas Land Company (entry No. 1123). Instead there were to be certificates of ownership in sitios (for text see entry No. 1118), the total to represent 5,600 sitios, or half the land supposed to be in the grants. Wilson's interest was not included in this conveyance and in a petition of Beales and Royuela dated March 13, 1832, for a renewal of the grant (see note to New Arkansas and Texas Land Company, entry No. 1138) he is referred to as "the late Stephen Julian Wilson." Robert Owen in his Opening Speech, Cincinnati, 1829 (entry No. 1110), reports staying with Exter at Mexico City in February, 1829, and tells of his large ownership of land in Mexico. Exter died either later that year or early in 1830. Efforts to sell an interest in the two grants in England are related in entry No. 1120, Emigration to Texas. Proposals for Colonizing Certain Extensive Tracts in the Republic of Mexico. That entry also reports on the LeGrand survey of the grant made in 1827 and on LeGrand's map. The grant of the Twenty League boundary strip lapsed in 1832 and was not renewed. As the larger Wilson grant was about to lapse because of no colonists, Beales and his associate Royuela obtained on March 14, 1832, a new grant with the same boundaries. This was assigned in 1833 to the New Arkansas and Texas Land Company, as recorded in the pamphlet of that company (entry No. 1138), and it appears from the pamphlet of the Colorado and Red River Land Company [New York, 1835] (entry Nos. 1157, 1157A) that in 1835 it belonged to that company. A sale to John Woodward on January 16, 1836, is recorded at page [3] of the section headed "Deeds" in Woodward's An Abstract, New York, 1842 (entry No. 1444), and, as shown in the Abstract, Woodward claimed reimbursement from the State of Texas for having been prevented from colonizing the grant because of the Texas Revolution. Its later history is given in An Abstract. This is the first of many entries recording the various interests of John Charles Beales (1804-1878) in this Wilson and Exter grant, in the Arkansas and Texas Land Company, the New Arkansas and Texas Land Company, the Colorado and Red River Land Company, and the Rio Grande and Texas Land Company. They are shown graphically on the Colorado and Red River Land Company's Map of Texas (entry No. 1158). There is an article on Beales and also on his Rio Grande colony in the Handbook of Texas, and there is an excellent thesis in the University of Texas Library by Miss Lucy Dickinson entitled, "Speculations of John Charles Beales in Texas Lands."; Sabin 104548.; Locations: NN. TWS.

Reel: 21
Arkansas and Texas Land Company.

Emigration to Texas.



Bath [England]: Printed by H.E. Carrington, Chronicle Office. [At end:] Printed by H.E. Carrington, Chronicle Office, Bath. 1831

1120; Proposals for Colonizing Certain Extensive Tracts of Land in the Republic of Mexico.; 18 p. 19 cm.; Entry No. 1119 gave the documents relating to the organization of the Arkansas and Texas Land Company in April, 1831, and the note went into the subsequent history of its two grants. This pamphlet, also published in 1831, is in the nature of a prospectus issued to promote the sale in England of the company's scrip, but no prices are given. It is signed at the end by John Enrico, who, as holder of Beales's power of attorney, had recently organized the Arkansas Company in New York, and by W.H. Egerton. The pamphlet first gives long quotations from Burnet's letter to the Trustees of the Galveston Bay Company (entry No. 1116), and from the Address of that Company (entry No. 1123), being careful, however, to avoid quoting even the disingenuous reference in the Address to the prohibitions against immigration from the United States in the law of April 6, 1830. The most interesting feature of the pamphlet is the account (p. 14-16) of the survey of the grant by Alexander LeGrand with a party of about thirty persons in 1827, and the extract from a letter of LeGrand to Richard Exter dated from Santa Fe, November 15, 1827, after he had completed his survey, making a short but favorable report on the grant. As this Bath pamphlet was published in 1831, the survey was clearly made before 1833, the date given by Brown, History of Texas, St. Louis, 1892 (Vol. I, p. 254); Miss Henderson in her "Minor Empresario Contracts" (Southwestern Historical Quarterly for July 1, 1928, Vol. XXXII, p. 23); Carl Coke Rister in Comanche Bondage, Glendale, 1955, p. 23; and Kennedy in the reproduction of the Arrowsmith map serving as frontispiece to his Texas, London, 1841 (entry No. 1385). The original Arrowsmith map, London, 1841 (entry No. 1373), has in the legend a date 1838 instead of 1833, but almost certainly the 1833 date used by Kennedy was intended. Kennedy in the advertisement to his Volume I says, "The survey must have been made in 1830 or 1831," but at page 182 he remarks that the survey had been made "for the use of the New Arkansas and Texas Land Company, claiming under contract entered into in 1832." Kennedy gives the text of the LeGrand "Field Notes and Journal of Survey" at pages 183-196. Evidence that the survey was made at least as early as 1828 is given by a manuscript map in my collection, A Map of Northern Part of Mexico including Exter and Wilson's Grant made from Legrand's Notes and other documents By S. McL. Staples A.M. Surveyor General of Chihuahua, 1828, 65 x 46 cm., boundaries colored, no graphic scale but about 35 miles to the inch. At top is the legend, "Contents of Exter and Wilson's grant in acres." This is followed by the acreage of each of the twelve sections of the grant. Staples (1800-1832) was a graduate of Bowdoin College, Maine, in the class of 1821. LeGrand's notes and his boundaries for the twelve sections of the grant are incorporated on a printed map for the first time in the Burr map of 1833 (entry No. 1134). Burr's treatment of the rivers is the same as in the Staples manuscript map, except that he does not repeat the error of Staples, of showing the False Washita River as having its headwaters in the grant. Neither Staples nor Burr has a legend on his map for the various comments made by LeGrand. These are extensively quoted in the Colorado and Red River Land Company map of 1835 (entry No. 1158), and again in the Arrowsmith 1841 map of Texas (entry No. 1373). The article on LeGrand in the Handbook of Texas gives the date of the survey as the summer of 1827 and remarks there is "some reason for suspecting that he may not have run any of the reported survey." An interesting article by T.C. Richardson in the West Texas Historical Year Book for October, 1955 (Vol. XXXI, p. 102-110), checked the LeGrand survey notes against the geographical features of the land supposed to be surveyed and came to the conclusion that his actual starting point was about a degree east of the intersection of the 102d meridian by the 32d parallel. On this assumption, Mr. Richardson traces LeGrand's movements, finding from time to time a fairly good correlation between the notes and the geographical features of the region traversed, and at other times quite a tangle. I should judge from his text that Mr. Richardson had no doubt but that the survey was made. The identification of the headwaters of the Canadian, Red, Brazos, and Colorado rivers proceeded only slowly in the first half of the nineteenth century, and correct representation of their courses took even longer. Mr. Richardson shows that some of these identifications made by LeGrand were faulty, but it is to be expected that the LeGrand notes on some of these features, as shown graphically by the Burr, Colorado and Red River Land Company, and Arrowsmith maps, would not from time to time agree with modern maps. Even so, it might be remarked that Staples, followed by Burr, in showing the course of the Canadian River, marked its intersection of the 102d meridian at only about half a degree too far to the south.; Sabin 95080.; Locations: CtY. NN. TWS.

Reel: 21
Arkansas and Texas Land Company.

Emigration to Texas.



Bath [England]: Printed by H.E. Carrington, Chronicle Office. [At end:] Printed by H.E. Carrington, Chronicle Office, Bath. 1832

1120A; Another issue [of entry No. 1120] with same title, printer's notice and collation, but with imprint, otherwise the same, dated 1832. Entry No. 1119 gave the documents relating to the organization of the Arkansas and Texas Land Company in April, 1831, and the note went into the subsequent history of its two grants. This pamphlet, also published in 1831, is in the nature of a prospectus issued to promote the sale in England of the company's scrip, but no prices are given. It is signed at the end by John Enrico, who, as holder of Beales's power of attorney, had recently organized the Arkansas Company in New York, and by W.H. Egerton. The pamphlet first gives long quotations from Burnet's letter to the Trustees of the Galveston Bay Company (entry No. 1116), and from the Address of that Company (entry No. 1123), being careful, however, to avoid quoting even the disingenuous reference in the Address to the prohibitions against immigration from the United States in the law of April 6, 1830. The most interesting feature of the pamphlet is the account (p. 14-16) of the survey of the grant by Alexander LeGrand with a party of about thirty persons in 1827, and the extract from a letter of LeGrand to Richard Exter dated from Santa Fe, November 15, 1827, after he had completed his survey, making a short but favorable report on the grant. As this Bath pamphlet was published in 1831, the survey was clearly made before 1833, the date given by Brown, History of Texas, St. Louis, 1892 (Vol. I, p. 254); Miss Henderson in her "Minor Empresario Contracts" (Southwestern Historical Quarterly for July 1, 1928, Vol. XXXII, p. 23); Carl Coke Rister in Comanche Bondage, Glendale, 1955, p. 23; and Kennedy in the reproduction of the Arrowsmith map serving as frontispiece to his Texas, London, 1841 (entry No. 1385). The original Arrowsmith map, London, 1841 (entry No. 1373), has in the legend a date 1838 instead of 1833, but almost certainly the 1833 date used by Kennedy was intended. Kennedy in the advertisement to his Volume I says, "The survey must have been made in 1830 or 1831," but at page 182 he remarks that the survey had been made "for the use of the New Arkansas and Texas Land Company, claiming under contract entered into in 1832." Kennedy gives the text of the LeGrand "Field Notes and Journal of Survey" at pages 183-196. Evidence that the survey was made at least as early as 1828 is given by a manuscript map in my collection, A Map of Northern Part of Mexico including Exter and Wilson's Grant made from Legrand's Notes and other documents By S. McL. Staples A.M. Surveyor General of Chihuahua, 1828, 65 x 46 cm., boundaries colored, no graphic scale but about 35 miles to the inch. At top is the legend, "Contents of Exter and Wilson's grant in acres." This is followed by the acreage of each of the twelve sections of the grant. Staples (1800-1832) was a graduate of Bowdoin College, Maine, in the class of 1821. LeGrand's notes and his boundaries for the twelve sections of the grant are incorporated on a printed map for the first time in the Burr map of 1833 (entry No. 1134). Burr's treatment of the rivers is the same as in the Staples manuscript map, except that he does not repeat the error of Staples, of showing the False Washita River as having its headwaters in the grant. Neither Staples nor Burr has a legend on his map for the various comments made by LeGrand. These are extensively quoted in the Colorado and Red River Land Company map of 1835 (entry No. 1158), and again in the Arrowsmith 1841 map of Texas (entry No. 1373). The article on LeGrand in the Handbook of Texas gives the date of the survey as the summer of 1827 and remarks there is "some reason for suspecting that he may not have run any of the reported survey." An interesting article by T.C. Richardson in the West Texas Historical Year Book for October, 1955 (Vol. XXXI, p. 102-110), checked the LeGrand survey notes against the geographical features of the land supposed to be surveyed and came to the conclusion that his actual starting point was about a degree east of the intersection of the 102d meridian by the 32d parallel. On this assumption, Mr. Richardson traces LeGrand's movements, finding from time to time a fairly good correlation between the notes and the geographical features of the region traversed, and at other times quite a tangle. I should judge from his text that Mr. Richardson had no doubt but that the survey was made. The identification of the headwaters of the Canadian, Red, Brazos, and Colorado rivers proceeded only slowly in the first half of the nineteenth century, and correct representation of their courses took even longer. Mr. Richardson shows that some of these identifications made by LeGrand were faulty, but it is to be expected that the LeGrand notes on some of these features, as shown graphically by the Burr, Colorado and Red River Land Company, and Arrowsmith maps, would not from time to time agree with modern maps. Even so, it might be remarked that Staples, followed by Burr, in showing the course of the Canadian River, marked its intersection of the 102d meridian at only about half a degree too far to the south.; Sabin 95080.; Locations: NN.

Reel: 21
Arkansas Gazette, Little Rock.

Arkansas Gazette - - Extra.

[Little Rock: Office of the Arkansas Gazette]. [1842]

1406; Thursday Eve., March 24, 1842. Invasion of Texas by Mexico! Capture of San Antonio and Goliad!! Invitation to Armed Emigrants!!!; Broadside in three columns. 33 x 27 cm.; The Extra begins as follows: By this evening's Columbia mail, we received the New-Orleans Bee, of 16th inst., containing the following highly important and astounding news--of the invasion of Texas by Mexico--the surrender of San Antonio and Goliad--the advance of a Mexican force of 15,000 men upon Texas--with the Proclamation of President Houston, calling his citizen soldiers to arms, in defence of their homes and fire-sides, and his letter of invitation to armed Emigrants. The account of the surrender of San Antonio then follows. It was taken from an extra of the Civilian and Galveston Gazette dated March 12, entry No. 508, the note to which tells how the news spread. Next is given President Houston's Proclamation dated at Galveston, March 10th (Writings of Sam Houston, Vol. II, p. 491), followed by a further account from another source and a report that General Houston had left Galveston Sunday morning, March 11, for the army. Houston's letter, dated March 11, to P. Edmunds, Consul at New Orleans, then follows (Writings of Sam Houston, Vol. IV, p. 80-81).; Allen, Arkansas Imprints, 99.; Locations: Heiskell.



Reel: 31
A las armas Mexicanos, que Santa-Anna es el campeon.

[Mexico]. [1841]

961.2; [At end:] México, Septiembre 21 de 1841. Imprenta del Callejon de los Camarones.; Broadsheet 29 x 20 cm.; Written at the time of Santa Anna's revolt against the Bustamante regime, this denunciation lists all his crimes against the Mexican people and publishes the text of the secret treaty which he signed at Velasco in May 1836. The anonymous author concludes with a demand that Santa Anna be tried as a criminal and be forever excluded from political office and military command.; Locations: CtY. TxU.

Reel: 15
Arrowsmith, Aaron.

A New Map of Mexico … 1810.

Additions to 1816. See entry No. 1046C.
Arrowsmith, Aaron.

New Map of Mexico … 1811.

See entry No. 1046A.
Arrowsmith, Aaron.

New Map of Mexico … 1815.

See entry No. 1046B.
Arrowsmith, Aaron, 1750-1823.

Chart of the West Indies and Spanish Dominions in North America. By A. Arrowsmith. 1803.

[At foot of each sheet:] London Published by A. Arrowsmith No 24 Rathbone Place. [Below title:] Jones Smith & Co sc. Beaufort Buildgs Strand. June 1st 1803

1031; 121 x 289 cm. Boundaries colored. No graphic scale, but about 40 miles to the inch.; Dedication in left corner of southwestern sheet: To Admiral John Willett Payne ... Printed on four sheets, with imprint at foot of each sheet. Apparently issued in two sheets, the two northern and the two southern sheets being joined.; Though the title here reads Chart of the West Indies, it is entered as it shows Texas to a little above the 32d parallel and west of El Paso, though very poorly, on a scale of about 40 miles to the inch. San Antonio de Bejar and "Labadia" now Goliad, and El Paso on the south side of the Rio Grande, now Juarez, are shown, as are the missions around San Antonio. The coast line follows generally the Carta Esferica of 1799, but with the longitude of Sabine Pass nearly correct, while the Carta Esferica puts this over a degree too far west. The latitude of El Paso is shown with approximate correctness, but its longitude, 105 [degrees] 15', is about a degree too far east. The rivers and their names are quite confused. Humboldt in the Geographical Introduction to his New Spain, London, 1811, has a long criticism at pages xliv-xlvii of the Mexican place locations in the Arrowsmith map. The later editions of this work do not extend as far as Texas.; Locations: CU-B. DLC. MB. MiU-C. NN. NNA. BM. TWS.


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