Texas as a Province and Republic 1795-1845 Author Index



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Reel: 33
[Allen, George, 1792-1883].

The Complaint of Mexico, and Conspiracy against Liberty.

Boston: Published by J.W. Alden. No. 7 Cornhill. [On verso of title:] Boston: Printed by S.N. Dickinson, 52 Washington Street. 1843

1446; 32 p. 24 cm.; In the 44-page issue, pages [33]-44 with caption "Appendix" give Webster's letter to Waddy Thompson of July 8, 1842, referred to here in the note to entry No. 1435. Allen, a clergyman, was a graduate of Yale, class of 1813. He was active in the formation of the Free Soil Party and at the time of this publication, and until his death, was Chaplain of the State Lunatic Hospital at Worcester. Here he attacks the attitude of Webster, as shown in the letter referred to above, and asserts a conspiracy "to wed Texas" and annex much Mexican territory. The tone of the pamphlet is shown by the reference (p. 16) to "the scoundrel expedition against Santa Fe." Raines remarks, "Much ill-temper and perversion of the truth."; Rader 103.; Locations: CSmH. DLC. NN. TxU.



Reel: 32
[Allen, George, 1792-1883].

The Complaint of Mexico, and Conspiracy against Liberty.

Boston: Published by J.W. Alden. No. 7 Cornhill. [On verso of title:] Boston: Printed by S.N. Dickinson, 52 Washington Street. 1843

1446A; Another issue [of entry No. 1446], with same title and imprint, but with the addition of an appendix, p. [33]-44.; 44 p. 24 cm. Printed paper wrappers. Wrapper title same. "Appendix. Mr. Webster to Mr. [Waddy] Thompson," dated, Department of State, Washington, July 8, 1842, signed, Daniel Webster. In the 44-page issue, pages [33]-44 with caption "Appendix" give Webster's letter to Waddy Thompson of July 8, 1842, referred to here in the note to entry No. 1435. Allen, a clergyman, was a graduate of Yale, class of 1813. He was active in the formation of the Free Soil Party and at the time of this publication, and until his death, was Chaplain of the State Lunatic Hospital at Worcester. Here he attacks the attitude of Webster, as shown in the letter referred to above, and asserts a conspiracy "to wed Texas" and annex much Mexican territory. The tone of the pamphlet is shown by the reference (p. 16) to "the scoundrel expedition against Santa Fe." Raines remarks, "Much ill-temper and perversion of the truth."; Rader 103, note. Raines, p. 7. Sabin 15048.; Locations: CtY. DLC. ICN. MH. NHi. NN. TxU. TxWB. TWS (presentation). Also other libraries.



Reel: 32
Almonte, Juan Nepomuceno, 1803-1869.

Noticia Estadistica sobre Tejas, por Juan N. Almonte.

Mexico. Impreso por Ignacio Cumplido, Calle de los Rebeldes n. 2. 1835

816; 96 p., Indice [4] P., 3 folding tables Nos. 2-4 following p. 96. 15.4 cm. Printed paper wrappers.; Wrapper title same, except for arrangement of imprint. Table 1 is printed on p. [91]-96. This Noticia Estadistica is based on a visit made to Texas by Almonte in the spring of 1834, at the orders of the Mexican government, to hear the complaints of the Texans and to gain time for the government to devote its attention to Texas matters. Barker in his Life of Austin, at pages 462-466, gives an excellent account of the visit and the resulting report, and of the instructions, both public and private, which preceded the journey. Almonte arrived at Nacogdoches by way of New Orleans in May, 1834, and had reached Monclova on his way back to Mexico City in September, 1834. His Noticia was published in February, 1835, shortly after the publication of Austin's Esposicion, and has a dedication to General Miguel Barragan dated Mexico, January 1, 1835. It is an invaluable account of Texas as it appeared to an intelligent observer in the year 1834. A translation of the Noticia by Carlos E. Castañeda is given in the Southwestern Historical Quarterly for January, 1925, Volume XXVIII, pages 177-222. A page or so of notes and a table are omitted from the translation. Filisola in Volume II of his Memorias para la historia de la Guerra de Tejas, published by Rafael in 1848, reprints this Noticia Estadistica, with some rearrangement, as an Appendix at pages [535]-577. Almonte played an important part in Mexican affairs. There is a good short sketch of his career in the Handbook of Texas.; Rader 125. Raines, p. 8.; Locations: C-S. CSmH. CU-B. CtY. DLC. ICJ. MH. MiU-C. MWA. TxSa-Court House. TxU. TxWB. BNM (Some of the foregoing may lack wrappers.) TWS.



Reel: 13
Alsbury, Horace A., d. 1847.

To the People of Texas.

[Brazoria: Printed by F.C. Gray]. [1835]

53; [Text begins:] Arriving this day from Monterray [sic] ... [continues with] information which I possess in regard to the designs of the Mexican Government towards the people of Texas ... [Signed and dated at end:] Horatio A. Alsberry [sic]. Columbia, August 28th, 1835.; Broadside in two columns. 19.3 x 15.4 cm.; This handbill, from which Dr. Barker in Johnson and Barker, Texas and Texans, quotes at considerable length in Vol. I, p. 243, gives a report from Alsbury, just back from Mexico, that the Mexican government plans to establish an "arbitrary despotism" in Texas, "drive from the country a number of our principal citizens," and "put their slaves free and let them loose upon their families." He urges that "immediate steps be taken for our preservation." Alsbury says he is giving this information at the request of the Chairman of the Committee of Safety for the jurisdiction of Columbia. The handbill, undoubtedly issued by the Columbia committee, which at its August 15 meeting, see entry No. 60, had voted for a Consultation of Texas, marks another step towards warlike, rather than peaceful, measures by the Texans, for, as Johnson and Barker remark, Vol. I, p. 238, of the work cited above, "there is little doubt that the peace party was in the ascendency down at least to the middle of August." It was not until a fortnight later, when Austin made his famous speech at the Brazoria dinner of September 8, entry No. 56, that the die was cast for war rather than peace. The sketch of Alsbury in the Handbook of Texas shows that he was one of Austin's "Old Three Hundred" and was active in military affairs until he met his death in the Mexican War.; This handbill is reprinted in the Austin Papers, Vol. III, p. 107-108.; Locations: CtY.



Reel: 1
Alta California (Mexican department). Comandante General Y Gefe Politico, 1835-1836 (Mariano Chico).

El C. Coronel Mariano Chico, Representante del Congreso Mejicano, Comandante General y Gefe Politico de la Alta California, á Sus Habicantes.

Monterrey [California] 24 de Julio de. Imprenta del C. Agustin V. Zamorano. 1836

1179; [Proclamation announcing the capture of Santa Anna, signed at end:] Mariano Chico. Broadside. 31 x 22 cm.; The first announcement to the Mexican people of Santa Anna's defeat and capture by the Texans was made in a proclamation at Mexico on May 19, 1836, by the interim president, José Justo Corro. The note to that proclamation, entry No. 884, lists other announcements of the defeat, including this Chico proclamation, which in that note is incorrectly dated June 24, 1836. This announcement of the defeat, in what was then far off California, is full of protestations of loyalty to Mexico. It is a rare example of the first press of California. Harding, Census of California Spanish Imprints, 16. Streeter considered this to be primarily an early California imprint rather than a Texas item, and did not include it with the Texas collection acquired by Yale: It was No. 2479 in the fourth sale of his collection in April 1968 and was acquired by the San Diego Public Library.; Locations: CSd.



Reel: 24
Alta Traicion del General Santa-Anna.

[At end:] Puebla. -- Imprenta de Juan Nepomuceno de Valle. 1844

998; [Publishes two documents in proof of the treason of Santa Anna, the "Convenio secreto" dated and signed at end, "Puerto de Velasco, Mayo 14 de 1836. -- Antonio Lopez de Santa-Anna. -- David G. Burnet (and three other Texan officials)," and a "Proclama" dated and signed at end, "Velasco, Junio 1.0 de 1836. -- Antonio Lopez de Santa-Anna."]; Broadside. 30 x 21 cm.; Locations: TxU.

Reel: 15
Alvarez de Toledo y Dubois, José, 1779-1858.

[Address to Mexicans].

[Philadelphia]. [1811]

1048; [Text begins:] Mexicanos: llegado es el tiempo señalado por la Providencia para que sacudais el yugo barbaro, y afrentoso, con que por el espacio de casi 300 años os oprimio ignominiosamente el despotismo mas insolente ... [Signed and dated at end:] J.A.T. Philadelphia, I.o de Octubre de 1811.; Broadsheet. 42 x 28 cm.; Toledo was an interesting character, well known in Texas history for supplanting José Gutiérrez de Lara as leader of the Gutiérrez-Magee Expedition of 1813 into Texas and for his later overwhelming defeat by the Royalists at the Battle of Medina in August, 1813. This broadsheet is entered as an example of one of the revolutionary addresses issued by Toledo at Philadelphia in 1811, urging Mexicans to continue the revolt from Spain that Hidalgo had started in 1810. The copy entered here has at the end the manuscript signature of José Bernardo Gutiérrez. Two others, also in my collection, are listed in Sabin 96117, 96118. Carlos Castañeda in Volume VI of his Our Catholic Heritage in Texas, Austin, 1950, says at pages 66-67 that it was agreed in January, 1812, between Gutiérrez and Toledo, who were at that time great friends, that Gutiérrez should return to Texas to try and establish a government similar to that of the United States and that he should distribute in the Interior Provinces some of Toledo's pamphlets. There is an excellent article on Toledo by Harris Gaylord Warren in the Handbook of Texas.; Locations: TWS.



Reel: 17
Alvarez de Toledo y Dubois, José, 1779-1858.

[Proclamation calling for Volunteers, July 1815].

[New Orleans]. [1815]

1055; [Broadside ?]; No copy located, but entered from reference in Selter's L'Odyssée Américaine d'une Famille Française, le Docteur Antoine Saugrain, Baltimore, 1936, p. 75. In speaking of General Pablo Anaya, Selter states that the latter "avait été rejoint à la Nouvelle-Orléans par un de ses compatriotes, le général Alvarez de Toledo. Au mois de juillet 1815, Toledo fit circuler une proclamation demandant des volontaires pour combattre pour la liberté.".



Reel: 17
American Anti-Slavery Society.

Human Rights--Extra.

New-York, September. 1837

1262.1; [Text begins:] Office of the American Anti-Slavery Society, New-York, Sept. 11, 1837. Congress is now in session. From all we can ascertain, we believe An Effort Will Be Made To Annex Texas To The Union, During Its Present Sitting.--Hence it is of the highest importance, that all memorials against this measure should be immediately--yea, Immediately, sent to that body. ... In behalf of the Executive Committee, H.B. Stanton, Corresponding Secretary. Forms of Petitions. … ; Broadside, text in double columns. 31 x 23 cm.; Locations: TWS.



Reel: 25
American Theatre, New York.

American Theatre Bowery.

Jared W. Bell, Printer. Franklin Hall, 17 Ann-street. [New York]. [1836]

1180; Benefit for the Relief of the Texians, now struggling against Tyranny and Oppression. The receipts of this night will be appropriated to afford the necessary means towards achieving their Liberty and Independence ... Thursday Even'g, January 7th, 1836, will be presented Otway's celebrated Tragedy of Venice Preserved. Broadside. 44 x 20 cm.; The above entry is based upon three positive photostats in the Texas State Library of what appears to be a broadside handbill. On the photostat in the lower right-hand corner, outside the border of the handbill is: "To his Excellency Honorable James B. Allred Governor of the State of Texas Compliments of Honorable F.H. La Guardia The Mayor of the City of New York." I have not found the location of the original handbill from which the photostats were made, nor have I learned the especial occasion of this benefit performance.



Reel: 24
Ampudia, Pedro de, 1803-1868.

El General Comandante de las armas á los habitantes de Tamaulipas.

[At end:] Impreso por Antonio Castañeda en la 1.a calle de Michoacán. [Matamoros]. [1842]

973; [Text begins:] Compatriotas. Los pérfidos cuanto ingratos tejanos reunidos en masa se abanzan hacia esta plaza con la decidida intencion de atacarnos, y de llevar la guerra y la devastacion del pais hasta donde puedan. [Dated and signed at end:] Matamoros Abril 17 de 1842. Pedro de Ampudia.; Broadside. 30.5 x 21 cm.; This proclamation of Ampudia, warning of a coming attack by the Texans, was perhaps occasioned by the publication of Houston's open letter of March 21, 1842, to Santa Anna, entry Nos. 541 and 542. Later in the year Ampudia was in command of the Mexican forces which overwhelmingly defeated the Texan expedition at Mier. This proclamation was issued both with and without an imprint.; Locations: CtY. TxU. TWS.



Reel: 15
Anaya, Juan Pablo de, 1785-1850.

Alocucion del Escmo.

Tabasco. Impreso por Trinidad Flores. 1840

950; Señor D. Juan Pablo de Anaya á sus Cociudadanos.; 14 p., blank leaf. 21.2 cm.; Anaya was one of the leaders in the Federalist movement along the Rio Grande River in 1839. Yoakum, Vol. II, p. 274, reports him as visiting Texas in the spring of 1839, when he said he was working for the establishment of the constitution of 1824, and then slips up by saying he was put to death at Tampico in 1839. In this Alocucion, which is dated at the end San Juan Bautista de Tabasco, Diciembre 6 de 1840, Anaya defends himself from charges that he had abandoned the Federalist cause and discusses his relations with the Texans and his subsequent stay in New Orleans. The "Virtuoso Canales" is praised and the "Vándalo" Valentin Canalizo, leader of the Centralist forces, held up to scorn.; Locations: CSmH. CtY.



Reel: 15
Anderson, Alexander Outlaw, 1794-1869.

The Letter of Alexander Anderson, of Tennessee, in reply to the Committee of Invitation to attend a dinner given by the Democracy of Maury, Tennessee, on the 13th July, to the delegation from that state to the National Convention.

[n.p.]. [1844]

1470; 27 p. 23 cm.; Caption title.; Anderson, a former United States senator from Tennessee, makes here an able and quite temperate argument for annexation. Much is said about the "all grasping hand of British ambition," and the letter is almost unique in that slavery is barely mentioned. It is also rather unusual among the pro-annexation publications of the time in stressing, though briefly, the gains to the United States as a whole that would result from annexation. The rejection of the Texas treaty is characterized (p. 3), as "the first instance in history, where a great nation has refused to enlarge its territorial limits for the purpose of protection and prosperity alike to itself and a kindred people." The Biographical Directory ... Congress records that in 1849 Anderson was a leader of an overland company that went to California.; Locations: DLC.



Reel: 33
[Anderson, Kenneth Lewis, 1805-1845].

[Circular].

[San Augustine: Printed at the Red-Lander Office]. [1841]

431; [To the Citizens of San Augustine. (Announcement of his candidacy for Representative and statement of principles, signed at end:) K.L. Anderson.]; [Broadside?]; Anderson was elected to the House and when the Sixth Congress assembled he was elected Speaker. No copy located, but the circular is printed in full in the Red-Lander (San Augustine), July 1, 1841, where it is described as having been "disseminated among the people" during the preceding week.



Reel: 6
Andrade, Juan José de.

Documentos Que el General Andrade publíca sobre la evacuacion de la ciudad de San Antonio de Bejar, del Departamento de Tejas, a sus compatriotas.

[At end:] Monterey: Imprenta del Nivel, propiedad de Lorenzo A. de Melo. 1836

849; 23, [1] p. 19 cm.; Caption title.; Acting under an order of General Filisola dated Goliad, May 18, 1836, entry No. 6, on pages 10-12, Andrade evacuated Bexar on May 24. Sometime afterwards an order was sent him from the Secretary of War that Bexar be held. In this pamphlet, where the introduction signed by Andrade is dated Monterey, July 25, 1836, Andrade publishes various documents justifying the evacuation, though of course Filisola's order of May 18 was alone sufficient. The pamphlet is most interesting in the picture it gives of the lack of food and sufficient clothing for the troops and the sufferings and deaths of the wounded due to lack of medicines. In Urrea's Diario of 1838, entry No. 940, document No. 46, subordinate No. 5, and documents Nos. 51-53 give letters passing in May and June, 1836, between Andrade and Urrea. The pamphlet is reproduced as No. 1 in Documentos para la Historia de la Guerra de Tejas, Mexico, Editora Nacional, 1952.; Rader 154. Raines, p. 10.; Locations: CSmH. CU-B. CtY. Tx. TxU. BNM. Zacatecas. TWS.



Reel: 14
Andrews, -----.

Eliza M. Westall, & Wm. G. Hill, vs. James F. Perry, & wife. Argument. Andrews, for plaintiffs.

[n.p.]. [184-?]

667; 52 ? p. 28.5 cm.; Caption title.; This is a printed argument by Andrews on the construction of the residuary clause of the will of Stephen F. Austin. Austin had divided his estate into two parts and left one part to his sister, Emily F. Austin, wife of James F. Perry, and the other part to his nephew, Stephen F. Austin, son of James E.B. Austin and Eliza Martha Westall, his wife. Austin then added a provision that if the nephew died without issue the nephew's share should go to Austin's sister Emily. The nephew died shortly after Austin, without issue, and leaving his mother, the plaintiff in this suit, as his sole heir. Andrews makes an elaborate argument that the additional provision made by Austin which directed the bequest to the sister, if the nephew died without issue, was contrary to the Civil Law and also the Constitution of Texas. Presumably the case was governed by the Civil Law, as the English common law did not replace the Civil Law in Texas until January 20, 1840. Some years ago Professor Eugene C. Barker, the great authority on Stephen F. Austin, in reply to my inquiries about this case was good enough to write: " ... I knew in general that the controversy had arisen and that it had been determined in general against James F. Perry and wife. ... The case was apparently instituted in 1839 in the Brazoria court, before the organization of the Supreme Court of the Republic. There is, therefore, in the published reports of the Supreme Court no record. In the Archives of the Supreme Court there is recorded a decree of the court reached by agreement of the attorneys of the parties, and that is all that appears here in Austin of record. I have also gone through the unpublished Austin papers without finding a single reference. Mr. Winkler tells me that he knows nothing of the details of the case." Mr. Winkler had suggested to me that the Andrews who wrote the brief might have been Stephen Pearl Andrews whose biography is given in the Dictionary of American Biography. On this point Professor Barker wrote me in a later letter:" ... Of course the firm of League, Andrews and Company was doing business in 1839, and Andrews could very well have prepared the argument for the district court. The name of Andrews does not appear in the pleadings before the Supreme Court. In my present state of ignorance, I don't lean toward Stephen Pearl Andrews. Apparently he did not arrive in Texas until 1839. He was already an active abolitionist, and would therefore have been questionable." The Wisconsin Historical Society copy, the only one located at present, ends with p. 52, but, as the last four pages are defective, the text does not indicate whether other pages are missing or not.; Locations: Whi.



Reel: 11
[Annexation Almanac for 1846].

[n.p.]. [1845]

1562; No copy located, but the almanac is advertised in the Civilian and Galveston Gazette, December 17, 1845, as "just rec'd per Brig Empire; this Almanac has now assumed the title as above, although long and favorably [known] in Texas as the Merchant's and Planter's Almanac, calculated for the latitude and longitude of Texas. For sale wholesale and retail by J.M. Jones strand".

Reel: 35
The Annexation of Texas and Seperation [sic] of the United States.

[n.p.]. [1844?]

1471; [24] p. 23 cm. Two signatures A, the first in four leaves, the second in eight. Stitched. Caption title. Introduction signed at p. [2]: Lundy. The signature "Lundy" on page [2] is undoubtedly a pseudonym as Benjamin Lundy had died in 1839. This pamphlet was probably published in the spring of 1844 when the Texas Annexation treaty was before Congress. At the foot of page two "Lundy" says, "The subsequent pages were published eight years ago, and the statements ... having been ... corroborated, their reprint will be appropriate in the present crisis." The 1836 publication was Lundy's War in Texas (entry No. 1217). There follow 22 unnumbered pages of extracts attacking slavery, drawn with some additions and omissions from signatures 19 and following of the Legion of Liberty, Albany, 1843 (entry No. 1419A).; Sabin 95068.; Locations: MH. MHi. MnU. NHi. TxU. TWS.

Reel: 33
The Annexation of Texas to the United States Fully and Fairly Discussed; together with All the Important Documents Connected with the Question.

Nashville: Printed by John P. Heiss--Union Office. 1844

1472; Published under the direction of the Central Committee.; 16 p., text printed in double columns. 23 cm.; This campaign document for Polk rings the changes on the prerequisites to the annexation of Texas in Clay's Raleigh Letter. Andrew Jackson's letter of March 11, 1844, is quoted in full.; Locations: TWS.

Reel: 33
The Annexation of Texas. By the Editor. [1844].

See [Minor, Benjamin Blake], entry No. 1521.


Annexation of Texas. Opinions of Messrs. Clay, Polk, Benton & Van Buren … [1844].

See Clay, Henry, entry No. 1487.


Anti-Texas Meeting at Faneuil Hall! Friends of Freedom!.

[Boston]. [1838]

1306; [Text begins:] A proposition has been made, and will soon come up for consideration in the United States Senate, to annex Texas to the Union. ... All opposed to this scheme, of whatever sect or party, are invited to attend the meeting at the Old Cradle of Liberty, to-morrow, (Thursday, Jan. 25,) at 10 o'clock, A.M. ... Bostonians! Friends of Freedom!! Let your voices be heard in loud remonstrance against this scheme, fraught with such ruin to yourselves and such infamy to your country. January 24, 1838.; Broadside. 24 x 20 cm.; Locations: DLC.

Reel: 27
The Anti-Texass [sic] Legion.

Sold at the Patriot Office, No. 9 Exchange st. Albany. 1845

1473A; Another issue [of entry No. 1473] with same title and collation, but with imprint, otherwise the same, dated 1845. This is quite similar to, and with many of the same stereotyped sheets as, Legion of Liberty. Remonstrance ..., Albany, 1843 (entry No. 1419A). The Library of Congress says that the preface to the 10th edition is signed J.R.A. [i.e.] Julius Rubens Ames?]. For more on these pamphlets see note to Legion of Liberty! and Force of Truth ..., 1842 (entry No. 1419). Through page [60] the sheets are from the same plates as the "Remonstrance" in the second edition of Legion of Liberty! and Force of Truth just referred to.; Sabin 95069.; Locations: CSmH. DLC. MB. MH-L. NN. TxU. TWS. Also other libraries.

Reel: 33
The Anti-Texass [sic] Legion.

Sold at the Patriot Office, No. 9 Exchange st. Albany. Six cts. single; 50 per dozen; $3 per hundred; $25 per thousand. 1844

1473; Protest of Some Free Men, States and Presses against the Texass Rebellion, against the Laws of Nature and of Nations. [Woodcut: Ruthless Rapine, Righteous Hope defies.] "Ye serpents! ye generation of vipers!! How can ye escape the damnation of hell!!!"; [72] p. 19 cm. Signatures 1-6 in sixes.; This is quite similar to, and with many of the same stereotyped sheets as, Legion of Liberty. Remonstrance ..., Albany, 1843 (entry No. 1419A). The Library of Congress says that the preface to the 10th edition is signed J.R.A. [i.e.] Julius Rubens Ames?]. For more on these pamphlets see note to Legion of Liberty! and Force of Truth ..., 1842 (entry No. 1419). Through page [60] the sheets are from the same plates as the "Remonstrance" in the second edition of Legion of Liberty! and Force of Truth just referred to.; Sabin 95069.; Locations: DLC. ICN. MB. MBAt. MH. NN. TxU. WHi. TWS.

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