Texas as a Province and Republic 1795-1845 Author Index



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Coahuila and Texas (Mexican state). Comisionado General Para el Repartimiento de Tierras Valdias (Juan Antonio Padilla).

Reglamento provisional para la mensura de tierras valdias.

[San Felipe de Austin: Printed by G.B. Cotten]. [1829]

15; [Dated and signed at end:] San Felipe de Austin, 21 de Diciembre 1829. Juan Antonio Padilla.; 4 p. 23 cm. Caption title. Text in Spanish and English; Spanish, p. [1] and 2; English, p. [3] and 4. Title of English version: Provisional regulations for the surveying of vacant Lands ----- A.D. 1829. These official instructions of Padilla were in fact written by Thomas Jefferson Chambers who in his Exposition, Brazoria, 1833 (entry No. 39) says, writing in the third person, p. 14: "Having been invited ... to take the office of principal surveyor of the state, his first care was ... to form under the approbation of the Commissioner-General a uniform system of surveying. This ... was published in both languages and transmitted to the government for its approbation. If it had been adopted, and the office of Commissioner-General had not been abolished, the endless confusion and mystery which at present obscures the subject of land titles, would have been removed, and not an inhabitant of Texas, who according to the laws has a right to land would have been without a title. But a system so general and uniform in its operation ... did not suit the private views of a few ... [and] the office of principal surveyor general was abolished, and that of principal surveyor fell with it." I give the long quotation as the Exposition seems to have survived only in my copy, and the part just quoted was not included in a later reprint (see note to the Exposition, entry No. 39). As stated in the note to entry No. 13, Padilla was jailed for murder before any titles were filled out by him. There is no charge against Austin by Cotten for printing these regulations unless the December 27, 1829, charge for "printing land titles for Padilla" (Austin Papers, Vol. II, p. 562-563) includes this leaflet.; Locations: TWS.



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Coahuila and Texas (Mexican state). Congreso.

Alocucion que el Congreso del estado dirije a sus comitentes con motivo a la data del decreto numero 90.

[Leona Vicario]. [1829]

737; [Dated and signed at end:] Ciudad de Leona Vicario 8 de Mavo de 1829. = Jose Manuel Cardenas, presidente. = Ramon Garcia Rojas, diputado secretario. = Mariano Garcia, diputado secretario.; Broadsheet. 30.5 x 21.3 cm.; This lengthy disquisition on the duties of a citizen to the state, and on the reasons which led Congress to impose an income tax in Decree No. 90, is included since the income tax applied to the whole state. Congress paints a gloomy picture of state deficits for the past six years and of its "acute grief" at having had to forego its projects for the common good because of lack of money. It is not in Kimball.; Locations: CtY. Tx. TxSa-Court House. TxU. TWS.



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Coahuila and Texas (Mexican state). Congreso.

Expediente en que constan los fundamentos en que se apoyo el Honorable Congreso Primero Constitucional del Estado de Coahuila y Texas para suspender de sus funciones al Vice-Gobernador, Consejo, gefes de departamento y de partido, y Tesorero del Estado, por su decreto numero 50, de 17 de Abril de 1828.

Leona Vicario. Imprenta del Gobierno del Estado de Coahuila y Texas, á del C José Manuel Bangs. 1829

738; Blank leaf, leaf of title, 92 p., errata [2] p., blank leaf. 20.5 cm.; As stated in the note to Manifiesto Dedicado à los habitantes de Coahuila y Tejas, Monterey, 1828 (entry No. 732), the passage of Decree No. 50 suspending for reasons of economy various offices of the state of Coahuila and Texas, caused a great hue and cry on the part of some of those affected, especially from the Council of the Governor. Apparently the dispute was very bitter, with those opposed to the decree laying great stress on its unconstitutionality. This Expediente gives the complete legislative history of the decree with the arguments pro and con in Congress, and by Governor Viesca and the Council of the Government. The debate is of general interest, not only for the discussions of economic conditions in the state, but also in showing a rather high standard of intellectual ability on the part of the state legislators. It is of especial Texas interest since, as the suspension included all department and district chiefs except for the department of Texas, there was quite a discussion as to whether conditions in Texas justified the exception. The Committee on constitutional questions is presenting a favorable report on the proposed decree justified the exception of not abolishing the office of political chief of Texas, along with the others, by stating that though the population of Texas was small there appeared to be several "de dura cerviz" and that consequently there should be a political chief in Texas. In a message to Congress dated Saltillo, April 28, 1828, Governor Viesca again stated his objections to the decree but said he would promulgate it if Congress, after due reflection, again gave its approval. This approval was given by Congress after further debate, recorded here, on May 10. This interesting discussion of the powers of the Congress of Coahuila and Texas under its Constitution is well worthy of study by those interested in questions of constitutional law.; Locations: Durango. Saltillo-AHE. TWS.



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Coahuila and Texas (Mexican state). Congreso Constitucional.

A fin de que lo resuelto por el H. Congreso en 28 de abril procsimo pasado … se impriman ... documentos ... Siguen.

[At foot of p. (3):] Leona Vicario. Imprenta del Gobierno a cargo del C. Antonio Gonzales Davila. 1832

774; [Report to the Governor, dated Leona Vicario, April 28, 1832, of changes in the constitution of the state suggested by Cayetano Ramos, Manuel Musquiz, and two others, in a communication to the Congress of the same date. At end:] Son copia de los originales que ecsisten archivados en la secretaria de este gobierno. Leona Vicario 1. de mayo de 1832. José Maria de Letona. Santiago del Valle secretario; 4-page folder printed on first [3] pages. 30.8 x 21.2 cm.; As far as I know, none of the suggested changes were made. Perhaps the most important of the recommendations was that the governor and vice-governor should be immediately eligible for re-election.; Locations: Tx.



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Coahuila and Texas (Mexican state). Congreso Constituyente.

Manifiesto del Congreso Constituyente del Estado de Coahuila y Tejas a Todos Sus Habitantes.



[Imprenta del Gobierno á Cargo de Jacobo Peters. Saltillo]. [1826]

707; [Text begins:] Coahuiltejanos: cuando vuestro Congreso caminaba con paso imperturbable y magestuoso à dar cima a la grande obra de asegurar vuestra futura felicidad dandoos una Constitucion eminentemente liberal ... [Appeal for support and explanation that Federal troops are stationed in Saltillo in response to the Governor's report to the President of the Republic of the shameful and subversive representation of the Ayuntamiento of Monclova. Dated and signed at end:] Sala de Sesiones del Congreso constituyente del Estado de Coahuila y Tejas. Saltillo 2 Marzo de 1826. Manuel Carrillo Presidente. Rafael Ramos y Valdés Dip. Srio. Santiago del Valle Dip. Srio.; 4-page folder printed on first [2] pages. 32 x 21.8 cm.; This and the pieces mentioned in this note relate to an attempt, only temporarily successful, by the governor and Congress of the new state of Coahuila and Texas to throttle free speech. Baron de Bastrop, the member of Congress from what is now Texas, was on the side of repression. Coahuila and Texas was the last of the states of the new republic of Mexico to adopt a constitution. This delay caused widespread discontent which the state government most unwisely attempted to suppress by passing Decree No. 21 of the Constituent Congress in February, 1826, entry No. 710, authorizing the governor of the state to imprison without legal process all those suspected of "attempting to disturb public tranquility." Decree 21 was followed by this Manifiesto of the Constituent Congress, giving reasons for the delay in adopting a constitution and reporting that Federal forces had been provided by the Central Government to help maintain order. A few days later, on March 11, 1826, Congress passed Decree No. 22 suspending from office any public functionary, ecclesiastical judge, curate or professor of science who had signed memorials against the government. Finally, under date of April 28, Ignacio de Arizpe, the vice governor, who had been acting as governor since March 5 because of the illness of the governor, issued a proclamation, entry No. 712, charging that an address of Jose Maria Letona in defense of two regidores imprisoned for opposition to the government was libelous and that his arrest was therefore justified. The proclamation printed the alleged libel in full as Document No. 1. A group known as Sociedad de Patriotas de la Capital del Estado de Nuevo Leon entered the fray in defense of Letona in an address, entry No. 715, in which Letona's so-called libel is printed with approval, and finally there was such a wave of protest that on May 27 Congress passed a decree of amnesty, Kimball No. 23 wrongly dating it March 27. Robles in his Coahuila y Texas gives an account of this affair at pages 207-210 of Volume I. Original examples of decrees No. 21, 22, and 23 mentioned above are in the Bexar Archives, in the Office of the County Clerk of Bexar County, and in my collection. This Manifiesto is also of interest as being the earliest example known to me of a publication of the government of Coahuila and Texas, other than a decree, which has survived in its original printing.; Locations: TxU. TWS.

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Coahuila and Texas (Mexican state). Congreso. Comision Especial Para Resolver Sobre la Peticion del Ayuntamiento de Leona Vicario.

Dictamen de la Comision especial del honorable congreso del Estado nombrada en 7 de septiembre para resolver sobre la peticion del ilustre ayuntamiento de esta capital y su vecindario à fin de que se lleve à efecto el art. 4. del plan de Jalapa en los empleados que se espresan.



[Leona Vicario]. [1830]

752; Improso [sic] en lo [sic] of cina del Supreme Gobierno del Estado á cargo del ciudadano Antonio Gonzalez Davila.; 4-page folder printed on all [4] pages, in double columns. 30.5 x 21 cm.; "Dictamen" dated and signed at end on page [3]: Sala de comisiones del H. Congreso. Leona Vicario septiembre 15 de 1830.--Cardenas.-- Garcia. Ibarra. Followed by "Representacion Dirijida por los vecinos que subscriben al ecsmo. sr. gobernador, pidiendo que sus nombres se inscriban en la acta que dio motivo a la peticion del ilustre ayuntamiento de que se ha hecho referencia," dated and signed at end on page [4]: Leona Vicario septiembre 14 de 1830. Santiago Valdes [and 11 others]. This Dictamen of the special committee of the state Congress and the Representacion dated September 14, 1830 which accompanies it are part of the opening moves of a little drama in which in the next three or four weeks most of the municipalities of the state were participants. It started with an election for senator to the Mexican Congress held by the state Congress on September 1, 1830. One of the two candidates was Ramos Arizpe, distinguished citizen of Leona Vicario, who had been a delegate from Mexico to the Cortes in Spain (See entry No. 1050 for his Memoria), and had served as Minister of Justice in President Victoria's cabinet. The other was Manuel Carrillo, a distinguished lawyer and judge of the state Supreme Court and one of the framers of the state constitution. The election was a tie, six to six, and because of the tie and in accordance with the law, lots were drawn with Carrillo the victor. Later that day the followers of Arizpe staged a protest meeting at Leona Vicario at which demanded that not only Carrillo but also four of the twelve members of the state Congress be removed from their respective positions because they no longer "merited the confidence of the people." Two of the four, José Maria Balmaceda and Rafael Manchola, were the deputies from Texas. On the same day all this was unanimously approved by the ayuntamiento of Leona Vicario, which followed on September 4 with a Representacion, entry No. 757, to the same effect addressed to the state Congress. Congress referred the petition of the ayuntamiento of Leona Vicario to the Comision Especial, which gave this report on September 14 recommending the removal of Carrillo and two of the four deputies. One of these was Balmaceda, one of the two deputies from Texas. This recommendation was carried out by the state Congress in Decree No. 149 (entered in Kimball), passed by Congress September 18, 1830, with the four proscribed deputies not voting. On September 28 Governor Viesca returned the decree to Congress with a veto message. A day or so before Congress had refused to accept Viesca's resignation as governor and had granted him a leave of absence (Decree No. 153 passed September 25 and entered in Kimball), and on September 30 Eca y Musquiz, who had been chosen by Congress to act as governor in the absence of Viesca, signed the decree. This is the first part of the story. The next chapter is told in the note to the entry here for Carrillo's Coleccion de Varios Documentos..., Leona Vicario, 1830, entry No. 749. The Coleccion reprints this Dictamen and the Representacion of September 14, and also the Representacion of September 4.; Locations: Tx TWS.

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Coahuila and Texas (Mexican state). Congreso. Diputacion Permanente.

Manifiesto al Estado, de la Diputacion Permanente Unida con el Consejo de Gobierno y Diputados Residentes en la Capital.



[Monclova]. [1834]

796; [Dated and signed at end:] Monclova juuio [sic] 26 de 1834. Marcial Borrego Presidente. José Jesus Grande Secretario.; Broadside. 42.5 x 30 cm.; As this happens to be the first entry under Coahuila and Texas for the year 1834 and as several of the entries for that year have to do with the confused situation in Coahuila, and with Santa Anna becoming in effect dictator of Mexico, a very brief statement of the political situation in the nation and state, continuing the statement made in the note to entry No. 775, may be helpful. After the election on March 30, 1833, of Santa Anna as president and Gomez Farias as vice-president, Santa Anna retired to his estate at Manga de Clavo, leaving the powers of the president in the hands of Gomez Farias, but returned to Mexico City to assume the presidency on May 16. There was an ineffective revolution in the summer of 1833 which Santa Anna, who had again retired to his Manga de Clavo property, was thought to have inspired. In April, 1834, he again took the reins of office and on May 27, 1834, was in effect made a dictator by the Centralist Plan of Cuernavaca, which also restored the clergy and army to power. On June 24, 1834, Governor Villaseñor had issued two unnumbered decrees of the Permanent Deputation (Kimball p. 277-279), one critical of the pronunciamientos of those hostile to the federal system of government, and the other calling for August 9th an extraordinary session of the state Congress. On the same day a decree, not given in Kimball but entry No. 810 here, was issued declaring that Coahuila and Texas would not recognize the official acts of Santa Anna made since May 31st. This Manifiesto, very anti-Santa Anna in tone, gives an account of the coup d'etat by which Santa Anna dissolved the general Congress on May 31. It ends with the statement made in the decree of two days before that the state would not recognize the official acts of Santa Anna until Congress was again free. In less than a month the Permanent Deputation bowed to the will of the majority and in the unnumbered decree of July 23, 1834, given in Kimball at page 280, recognized Santa Anna as president and yielded obedience to his executive acts which "are in conformity to the constitution and general laws." This was followed by a decree of the ayuntamiento of Monclova and a few members of Congress of August 30, 1834, entry No. 811, removing Villaseñor from the office of governor and proclaiming Juan José Elguezabal governor. In the meantime armed conflicts had arisen between the Coahuila towns of Leona Vicario and Parras, and Leona Vicario, the former capital, had refused to recognize actions taken by the State Congress at the new capital of Monclova. The new governor, Elguezabal, negotiated a truce of this conflict; see entry No. 799 for this truce of November 6, 1834, referring the dispute to Santa Anna, who in a decision of December 2nd, reported by Elguezabal on December 16, 1834, entry No. 800, ruled that the capital should remain at Monclova and that Elguezabal should remain as governor until new elections could be held.; Locations: DLC. Tx. TxU. Saltillo-AHE.

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Coahuila and Texas (Mexican state). Congreso. Diputacion Permanente.

[Resolution of the permanent deputation of the congress of Coahuila and Texas recognizing Manuel Gomez Pedraza as constitutional president of the Republic, as communicated by José Jesus Grande, its deputy secretary, to the Governor of Coahuila and Texas, and published by him].



[Leona Vicario]. [1832]

775; [Dated and signed at end:] Leona-Vicario 21 de agosto de 1832. Rafael Eca y Muzquiz Santiago del Valle secretario.; 4-page folder printed on page [1]. 20.7 x 15 cm.; With heading: Gobierno Supremo del Estado de Coahuila y Tejas. This recognition of Pedraza as constitutional president of Mexico serves to date the endorsement of the ruling authorities at the capital of Coahuila and Texas, and through them of the state, to Santa Anna's bid for power in Mexico in the year 1832. As it is always a little difficult for most of us whose main interest is Texas to carry in our heads the changes in the government of Mexico consequent on the many revolutions which plagued that country, it may be convenient to list here the important changes in Mexico from 1828 to the beginning of the year 1833 which led to the recognition of Pedraza, and the subsequent new elections of February, 1833. These are primarily matters of Mexican history and bibliography and, except for this resolution and the February 4, 1833, decree and instructions regarding the new elections, entry Nos. 789 and 787, none of the broadsides and the like relating to these matters, which primarily have to do with matters of Mexican history, are entered here, even though printed in Coahuila. In the 1828 elections Gomez Pedraza had been elected president to succeed Victoria for the four-year term beginning April 1, 1829, but in the fall of 1828 Vicente Guerrero led a revolt which gave him the presidency, with the vice presidency going to Anastasio Bustamante. Pedraza fled to the country and early in 1829 to London. In December, 1829, Bustamante in turn led a successful revolt against President Guerrero and by the end of the month had been accepted by all the states of Mexico except Veracruz. On January 1, 1830, he assumed the office of chief executive and, though keeping his title of vice president, held the reins of government with little opposition until January, 1832. In that month the state of Veracruz, with Santa Anna in the background, pronounced in favor of the Federal Constitution of 1824. After initial reverses the revolt gained momentum and by the summer two at least of the states proposed that Pedraza be called back to finish his term as president. By August, 1832, the state of San Luis Potosí had gone over to Santa Anna and Pedraza and this folder of August 21, 1832, records a like decision on the part of the permanent deputation of Coahuila and Texas. It followed a recommendation of Governor Letona of Coahuila and Texas dated a few days earlier, to which various documentos were attached (not entered here). Finally on December 23, 1832, Santa Anna and Bustamante came to an agreement, known as the Plan of Zavaleta, which called for the establishment of a federal form of government and recognized Pedraza as president for the term ending April 1, 1833, to which he had been elected in 1828. The Plan also called for new elections to be held at once for the General and State Congresses and for president and vice president of Mexico. The state of Zacatecas and two or three others did not at first agree to this plan and in December the state of Zacatecas proposed the setting up of a special assembly to reorganize the Mexican government. This Zacatecas plan was recommended, with slight changes, to the legislature of Coahuila and Texas by a Comision de Gobernacion in a report dated Leona Vicario, January 6, 1833 (not entered here), and the plan as adopted was printed in broadside form (also not entered), but shortly afterwards these opposition plans to the Plan of Zavaleta collapsed. Accordingly Governor Veramendi of Coahuila and Texas issued calls for the new elections, and instructions for holding them, in two broadsides each dated February 4, 1833, entry Nos. 789 and No. 787. As a result of the new elections held throughout Mexico Santa Anna was elected president of Mexico on March 30, 1833, and Gomez Farias vice-president. It might be noted that Santa Anna's Plan of Zavaleta called for the establishment of a truly federal plan of government.; Locations: TWS.

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Coahuila and Texas (Mexican state). Constitution.

Constitución Política del Estado de Coahuila y Texas, Saltillo, 1828.

See entry No. 708A.
Coahuila and Texas (Mexican state). Constitution.

Constitucion Política del Estado Libre de Coahuila y Tejas.

México. 1827

See entry No. 708A.


Coahuila and Texas (Mexican state). Constitution.

Constitucion Politica del Estado Libre de Coahuila y Tejas … Leona Vicario, [1829].

See entry No. 708B.
Coahuila and Texas (Mexican state). Constitution.

Constitucion Política del Estado Libre de Coahuila y Tejas, sancionada por su Congreso constituyente en 11 de Marzo de 1827.



México. Imprenta de Galvan, a Cargo de Mariano Arevalo. Calle de Cadena núm. 2. 1827

708A; An edition of the completed Constitution [entry No. 708], with title: Constitucion Política del Estado Libre de Coahuila y Tejas, sancionada por su Congreso constituyente en 11 de Marzo de 1827.; 107 p., verso blank, Indice [2] p. 14 cm.; Texas was the last state of Mexico to adopt a constitution, and as stated in the note to the Manifiesto of March 2, 1826, entry No. 707, the delay in drafting a constitution brought four cities of the state to open revolt. The constitution as finally adopted, entered here in its first complete printing, is a rather crude production from our modern point of view, but until the Texas Revolution it was the fundamental law for Texas, and this original edition is accordingly one of the great Texas books. With it should be read the Law of Convocation passed by the Constituent Congress on March 23, 1827, Kimball, page 47, or only a fortnight or so after the adoption of the Constitution. The Law of Convocation provides for the election of the first Constitutional Congress and the officers of government. One of the provisions was that Texas should have two of the twelve deputies, and states the number from the other districts of Monclova and Saltillo, a subject on which the Constitution says nothing. The Constitution had provisions for a congress of twelve deputies with a two-year term, a permanent deputation, a governor, vice governor, and governor's council, and three short sections regarding the judicial system. Much space is given to elaborate provisions regulating the election of deputies to the state congress. It appears from the journals of this Congress that the printing of the Constitution was discussed at some of the February, 1827, sessions, and that the reason for printing this Constitution at Mexico City rather than on the government press at Saltillo was because shortage of type at the latter press meant the printing would take considerable time. Finally, on February 13, a resolution was made that the Constitution be sent to Mexico City for printing and that 300 copies be printed. That resolution, amended to provide for printing 600 copies, was passed on February 14. This 1827 edition follows an edition (entry No. 708 an incomplete copy) of the text of the thirty-two preliminary articles of the Constitution and the "Titulo Primero," giving the provisions regarding the legislative branch of the government. As commented on in the note to that entry, the provision there regarding slavery is vastly more stringent than the provisions in the text as finally adopted. The importance of the Constitution at the time is shown by contemporary English translations of the final 1827 draft published at Natchitoches, Louisiana, in 1827, and at Chillicothe, Ohio, in 1829, entry Nos. 1093 and 1106. The Constitution is reprinted in Coleccion de Constituciones de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos, México, 1828, Volume I, pages 195-273; in Spanish and English in Kimball's Laws and Decrees, Houston, 1839, at pages 313-343, and in English, reprinting from Kimball, in Gammel, Volume I, pages 423-453. This is perhaps the place to record a "ghost" edition of the Constitution. Mr. Robles in his Bibliografia de Coahuila, Mexico, 1927, at page 51, gave a brief listing without collation of an edition he says was published at Saltillo in 1828, but made no mention of the Leona Vicario edition of 1829. Leona Vicario is the name which for a short time was applied to Saltillo under a decree passed November 15, 1827 (Kimball, No. 29). That this 1828 edition was an erroneous entry for the 1829 edition is evidenced by the fact that Mr. Robles in his later La Primera Imprenta en los Provincias Internas de Oriente, México, 1939, at page 71, and again in his Coahuila y Texas, México, 1945-1946, Volume I, at page 339, gives extensive accounts of the 1829 edition with a reproduction of its title page, but does not include the 1828 edition among the 1828 books he mentions as printed in Coahuila.; Kimball, p. [313]. Sabin 94941.; Locations: CSmH. PPAmP. TxU. TWS.
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