Texas as a Province and Republic 1795-1845 Author Index



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Reel: 6
A Citizen of Massachusetts.

Review of Dr. Channing's Letter … 1837.

See entry No. 1288.
A Citizen of the United States.

See [Lundy, Benjamin], entry Nos. 1217 and 1217A.


Citizens of Texas.

Citizens of Texas!.

[Houston: Printed at the Telegraph Office]. [1841]

439; [Election circular got out by supporters of David G. Burnet in the presidential election of September 1841]. [Text begins:] You are about to elect a Chief Magistrate of the Nation ... ponder well the following statements ... [Followed by two parallel columns on the respective records of Burnet and Houston, most laudatory of Burnet, and devastating, if true, as to Houston, and below, by three columns of sample ballots, five copies of each specimen]; Broadside. 48 x 30 cm.; Houston is charged with refusing to protect the frontier and with saying that "'he hoped every man, woman and child that settled North of the San Antonio road would be tomahawked.'" It is said that "he has become almost insane from dissipation, and his mind is so broken down that he is as forgetful as an old man in second childhood." On the other hand, Burnet "is sober, honest and capable ... this amiable and excellent man is poor ... but this very poverty peculiarly fits him for the office of President of a poor people." Each column of the sample ballot is headed by Burnet's name for President with Memucan Hunt's name for Vice President in one column and that of Edward Burleson for Vice President in another column. In the third column there is no name for Vice President. There is no name after "For Representative." in any of the three columns. This is the first entry here relating to the spirited campaign for the presidency carried on by Burnet and Houston in the summer of 1841. An editorial in the Colorado Gazette and Advertiser (Matagorda) of August 21, 1841, says that Dr. Francis Moore of the Telegraph, one of Burnet's strong supporters, wrote this "whining electioneering hand bill," and put it out "on the eve of the election … so as to prevent its being answered, unless by accident a copy may fall into the hands of the editor of an independent paper." One of the features of the campaign was the publication of the new edition of Houston Displayed, entry No. 440. See also the two attacks on Burnet by Houston, under the signature of "Truth," entry Nos. 445 and 446. At the election held on the first Monday of September, 1841, Houston was overwhelmingly elected, receiving over three-quarters of all votes cast. There are also several entries here relating to contests for the less important offices of representatives, sheriffs and the like.; Locations: TxAuDR. TxU.



Reel: 6
Citoyen de New-York.

Lettre d'un Citoyen de New-York au sujet de l'Annexion du Texas à l'Union Américaine … 1845.

See [Bonnefoux, Laurent?], entry No. 1564.
City of Galveston, on Galveston Island, in Texas: with a History of the Title of the Proprietor, and a Brief Account of All Its Advantages.

New Orleans---Printed by Hotchkiss & Co. 1837



1268; Accompanied with a Plan of the City and Harbor, and a Map of Texas, Showing the Commercial Channels with the Interior through Which the City Is to Derive Its Extensive Trade.; 8 p., 2 folding maps. 26 cm. Plain green wrappers.; Maps: Plan of the City of Galveston Situated on the East End of Galveston Island Texas Lithographic Office 53 Magazine St N. Orleans [1837.] 52 x 81 cm. No graphic scale, but about 800 feet to the inch. Inset: Survey of the Port of Galveston Made by order of the Mexican Government in 1828 by Alexander Thompson. Map of the Republic of Texas Shewing its division into Counties and Latest Improvements to 1837 Compiled & Written on Stone by H. Groves Lithc Office 53 Magazine St. N.O. 69 x 56 cm. No graphic scale, but about 25 miles to the inch. Prime Meridians: [Greenwich and Washington]. This anonymous publication is a well written statement on the legal title of the region set apart for the new city of Galveston and on its expected great future growth in trade and importance because of the superiority of Galveston Harbor over all other Texas ports. It is in effect a prospectus, though the only reference to the capital stock of the enterprise is made in the last sentence, "Now is the time to buy stock in this splendid city. Either stock or lots bought in it, must soon advance one hundred per cent." The original documents relating to the title and to the organization of the town site company are given in another publication of the same year, Documents, Shewing the ... Title to the Town Site, on Galveston Island (entry No. 1272). The "Plan of the City" is the first printed map of Galveston and the large scale "Map of Texas," or perhaps the smaller scale Huntington Map of Texas (entry No. 1278), for the priority is difficult to determine, has the distinction of being the first map of Texas to show the counties of the new Republic. The area of the two maps is about the same as that of the Austin maps, all with their northern boundary between the 34th and 35th parallels, or roughly the Red River, and their western boundary at about the 102nd meridian. The Groves and Huntington maps show Houston and the proposed city of Galveston. These are not shown on either the Austin or Young maps of 1837, but are on the inset of the rare map of the City of Houston of 1836 (entry No. 1208). The Groves map shows Texas coming of age with three projected lines of railroads, two starting from Houston and the third, as stated in the text of the pamphlet, "from the three forks in the Trinity river to Fort Towson or Pecon [sic] Point on Red River." There are examples of the Groves map, but not of the accompanying pamphlet, in the University of Texas Library and in my collection. Judging by the wide margins outside the north and south neat lines on my copy, the map was also separately issued. Throughout the text Menard, the principal organizer of the Galveston City Company, is referred to as "Col. Maynard."; Rader 823.; Locations: DLC. Phi (lacks map of Texas).

Reel: 25
Civilian and Galveston Gazette.

[Address of the Carrier of the Civilian and Galveston City Gazette, January 1, 1843].

[Galveston: Printed at the Civilian and Galveston City Gazette Office]. [1843]

555; [Broadside?]; No copy located, but quoted from in Ben C. Stuart's History of Texas Newpapers, at p. 171-172 of the typescript in the University of Texas Library.



Reel: 9
Civilian and Galveston Gazette.

[Address of the Carrier of the Civilian and Galveston Gazette, January 1, 1842].

[Galveston: Printed at the Civilian and Galveston Gazette Office]. [1842]

507; [Broadside?]; No copy located, but quoted from in Ben C. Stuart's History of Texas Newspapers, at p. 170-171 of the typescript in the University of Texas Library.



Reel: 8
Civilian and Galveston Gazette.

[Civilian. Extra. Saturday, March 12, 1842.].

[Galveston: Printed at the Civilian and Galveston Gazette Office]. [1842]

508; [Publishes news of the taking of San Antonio by the Mexicans.]; [Broadside?]; As I have entries for newspaper extras printed in Little Rock, Arkansas, and Columbus, Ohio, giving the news of the taking of San Antonio on Saturday, March 5, 1842, I think it may be interesting to jot down here how the news spread. The report of the taking was first printed at Austin in a broadside dated, "Gazette Office, Half-past 10 o'clock, Mond. morn." [March 7, 1842], entry No. 501. This was reprinted with additional information in an extra of the Gazette issued either after seven o'clock Tuesday night, March 8, or Wednesday, March 9, entry No. 502. The news next appears, as far as my information goes, in the extra of the Civilian and Galveston Gazette for March 12, entry No. 507. It appears that the news came to Galveston via "the steamer Dayton" from Houston and that the news had come to Houston in "expresses arrived yesterday from Austin dated Monday last," that is, Monday, March 7. This well may have been printed in an extra of a Houston paper. It appears from the Arkansas Gazette extra of March 24 that the news was published in the New Orleans Bee of March 16, so that it took over a week for the news to go from New Orleans to Little Rock. My last entry for the story is the Ohio Statesman--Extra, dated "Columbus, March 26, 5 o'clock [p.]M." The news there is reported to have come by way of Cincinnati, from an extra of the New Orleans Crescent City. That in turn, like the New-Orleans Bee, got its information from the March 12 extra of the Civilian and Galveston Gazette. No copy located, but quoted from in an extra of the Arkansas Gazette, Little Rock, March 24, 1842, entry No. 1406.



Reel: 8
Civilian and Galveston Gazette.

Civilian---Extra. Monday, March 21, 1842.

[Galveston: Printed at the Civilian and Galveston Gazette Office]. [1842]

509; [Publishes an address from the Committee of Safety of Matagorda "To the Citizens (of) the Eastern Counties," telling of the approach of the Mexican army and appealing for help, signed by M. Talbott, Ch. Jus., Chmn. and eight others, and dated Matagorda, March 19, 1842. Text begins:] The following reached us this morning by Mr. S. Mussina, who left Matagorda at noon on Saturday. ...; Broadside. 23.4 x 12.7 cm.; This broadside shows the wild rumors that ran through southeast Texas when Mexican troops occupied San Antonio without opposition on March 5, 1842. The reports given here were that as many as 9,000 Mexican troops were invading the country by the Matagorda road, and 12,000 on the road to San Antonio, with the address warning, "If there is not a prompt turnout by the Middle and Eastern counties, the enemy will ravage and overrun our country."; Locations: TWS.



Reel: 8
Civilian and Galveston Gazette.

[Extra of January 1, 1845, publishing news of the overthrow of Santa Anna, and of President Tyler's message urging the immediate annexation of Texas].

[Galveston: Printed at the Civilian and Galveston Gazette Office]. [1845]

617. [Broadside?]; President Tyler's message urging annexation was dated December 18. No copy located, but the news is republished from this extra in the Telegraph and Texas Register of January 1, 1845.



Reel: 10
Civilian and Galveston Gazette.

[Extra of January 15, 1843, publishing an account of the progress of the Somervell Expedition].

[Galveston: Printed at the Civilian and Galveston City Gazette Office]. [1843]

556; [Broadside?]; The Somervell Expedition, organized to avenge the capture of San Antonio by the forces of General Woll in September, 1842, had captured Laredo on December 8 and caused the surrender of the city of Guerrero on the Salado shortly afterwards. Somervell with part of his force then retired to Gonzales, but the greater number continued to Mexico in what is known as the Mier Expedition. No copy located, but the account is republished from this extra in the Civilian and Galveston City Gazette of January 18, 1843. Documents relative to the Dismissal of Post-Captain Edwin W. Moore, from the Texian Navy ... 1843. [Washington, D.C. 1847.] See note to [Moore, Edwin Ward], To the People of Texas, [1843], entry No. 559.



Reel: 9
Civilian and Galveston Gazette.

[Extra of September 29, 1842, publishing reports on the campaign against the Mexican invaders under General Woll].

[Galveston: Printed at the Civilian and Galveston City Gazette City Gazette Office]. [1842]

510. [Broadside?]; No copy located, but the reports are republished from this extra in the Civilian and Galveston City Gazette of October 1, 1842.



Reel: 8
Clarke, James Freeman, 1810-1888.

The Annexation of Texas.

Boston: Office of the Christian World. 1844

1484; A Sermon, delivered in the Masonic Temple on Fast Day. By James Freeman Clarke. Published in compliance with a Vote of the Church of the Disciples.; 42 p., erratum [1] p., verso blank. 14 cm. Printed paper wrappers.; Wrapper title: A Discourse on the Annexation of Texas. By James Freeman Clarke. Preached on Fast Day, April 4, 1844. [Quotations from Isaiah and from Channing, 15 lines.] The intensity of the feeling among many in the North on annexation is shown by Clarke's statement here (p. 15-16): "The one thing ... which can prevent this event ... is the universal expression, by the whole Northern people, of a determination to Repeal the Union the moment that Texas is annexed to it." This is by a noted clergyman of whom the Dictionary of American Biography remarks, "Dr. Clarke's most notable characteristic was a remarkable balance and wisdom." Though Clarke gives many arguments against annexation, the intensity of his feeling seems to be due to his hatred of slavery and his fear that its cause would be advanced by annexation.; Sabin 13409.; Locations: CtY. DLC. MB. MBAt. MH. NHi. NN. TxU. TWS.



Reel: 33
Clay, Cassius Marcellus.

Speech on the Annexation of Texas delivered December 30, 1843.

For editions of this speech with varying titles, some of which are without imprint date, see entry Nos. 1485-1485F.
Clay, Cassius Marcellus, 1810-1903.

C.M. Clay's Speech. [Prospectus of The Monthly Patriot.] Speech of C.M. Clay, delivered ... the 30th of December, 1843.

[Albany: Office of the Albany Weekly Patriot]. [1844]

1485E; Another edition [of entry No. 1485], with slightly varying title. 8 p., text printed in double columns. 23 cm.; Caption title.; This is a powerful attack on annexation and slavery by one of the leading citizens of Kentucky. That most of those present at its delivery were undoubtedly strong partisans of annexation and slavery meant nothing to Clay, who is characterized by the Dictionary of American Biography as having "unfaltering honesty, indiscreet pugnacity and the wild spirit of the crusader." Clay's rejected resolutions alleged annexation was unconstitutional, a breach of our treaty with Mexico, and a just cause for the dissolution of the Union. The wide circulation of the speech, as shown by the number of editions listed, (entry Nos. 1485-1485F) marks it as one of the most important of the separately published pieces against annexation and its early date, December 30, 1843, tended to focus the attention on annexation which came to a head in 1844. The different editions listed here differ slightly in form and content, some having notes not present in the others. The speech was first printed in the Lexington Observer and reprinted in the Cincinnati Morning Herald for January 12 and 17, 1844. The broadside, "From the Cincinnati Herald," was probably printed at the Cincinnati Herald office, and if so, it is probably the first separate appearance of the speech. Notes in the pamphlet edition with the Lexington edition is the most useful as it gives the text of the resolutions offered by Clay and rejected by the meeting.; Locations: TxGR. TxU. TWS.



Reel: 33
Clay, Cassius Marcellus, 1810-1903.

Speech of Cassius M. Clay, against the Annexation of Texas to the United States of America, in reply to Col. R.M. Johnson and Others, in a Mass Meeting of Citizens of the Eighth Congressional District, at the White Sulphur Springs, Scott County, Ky., on Saturday, Dec. 30, 1843.

Lexington: Printed at the Observer and Reporter Office. 1844

1485A; Another edition [of entry No. 1485]. 22 p., blank leaf. 24 cm.; This is a powerful attack on annexation and slavery by one of the leading citizens of Kentucky. That most of those present at its delivery were undoubtedly strong partisans of annexation and slavery meant nothing to Clay, who is characterized by the Dictionary of American Biography as having "unfaltering honesty, indiscreet pugnacity and the wild spirit of the crusader." Clay's rejected resolutions alleged annexation was unconstitutional, a breach of our treaty with Mexico, and a just cause for the dissolution of the Union. The wide circulation of the speech, as shown by the number of editions listed, (entry Nos. 1485-1485F) marks it as one of the most important of the separately published pieces against annexation and its early date, December 30, 1843, tended to focus the attention on annexation which came to a head in 1844. The different editions listed here differ slightly in form and content, some having notes not present in the others. The speech was first printed in the Lexington Observer and reprinted in the Cincinnati Morning Herald for January 12 and 17, 1844. The broadside, "From the Cincinnati Herald," was probably printed at the Cincinnati Herald office, and if so, it is probably the first separate appearance of the speech. Notes in the pamphlet edition with the Lexington edition is the most useful as it gives the text of the resolutions offered by Clay and rejected by the meeting.; Sabin 13536, note.; Locations: CtY. DLC. MB. MH. NN. TWS.



Reel: 33
Clay, Cassius Marcellus, 1810-1903.

Speech of Cassius M. Clay, delivered ... the 30th of December, 1843.

[n.p.]. [1844]

1485F; Another edition [of entry No. 1485], with slightly varying title. 8 p., text printed in double columns. 23 cm.; Caption title. This is a powerful attack on annexation and slavery by one of the leading citizens of Kentucky. That most of those present at its delivery were undoubtedly strong partisans of annexation and slavery meant nothing to Clay, who is characterized by the Dictionary of American Biography as having "unfaltering honesty, indiscreet pugnacity and the wild spirit of the crusader." Clay's rejected resolutions alleged annexation was unconstitutional, a breach of our treaty with Mexico, and a just cause for the dissolution of the Union. The wide circulation of the speech, as shown by the number of editions listed, (entry Nos. 1485-1485F) marks it as one of the most important of the separately published pieces against annexation and its early date, December 30, 1843, tended to focus the attention on annexation which came to a head in 1844. The different editions listed here differ slightly in form and content, some having notes not present in the others. The speech was first printed in the Lexington Observer and reprinted in the Cincinnati Morning Herald for January 12 and 17, 1844. The broadside, "From the Cincinnati Herald," was probably printed at the Cincinnati Herald office, and if so, it is probably the first separate appearance of the speech. Notes in the pamphlet edition with the Lexington edition is the most useful as it gives the text of the resolutions offered by Clay and rejected by the meeting.; Locations: TWS.



Reel: 33
Clay, Cassius Marcellus, 1810-1903.

Speech of Cassius M. Clay, delivered ... the 30th of December, 1843.

[Utica: Published by the New York State Anti-Slavery Society]. [1844]

1485C; Another edition [of entry No. 1485], with slightly varying title. 8 p., text printed in double columns. 23 cm.; Caption title. At head of caption title: Tract No. 10, Published by the New York State Anti-Slavery Society, at their Office in Utica.; This is a powerful attack on annexation and slavery by one of the leading citizens of Kentucky. That most of those present at its delivery were undoubtedly strong partisans of annexation and slavery meant nothing to Clay, who is characterized by the Dictionary of American Biography as having "unfaltering honesty, indiscreet pugnacity and the wild spirit of the crusader." Clay's rejected resolutions alleged annexation was unconstitutional, a breach of our treaty with Mexico, and a just cause for the dissolution of the Union. The wide circulation of the speech, as shown by the number of editions listed, (entry Nos. 1485-1485F) marks it as one of the most important of the separately published pieces against annexation and its early date, December 30, 1843, tended to focus the attention on annexation which came to a head in 1844. The different editions listed here differ slightly in form and content, some having notes not present in the others. The speech was first printed in the Lexington Observer and reprinted in the Cincinnati Morning Herald for January 12 and 17, 1844. The broadside, "From the Cincinnati Herald," was probably printed at the Cincinnati Herald office, and if so, it is probably the first separate appearance of the speech. Notes in the pamphlet edition with the Lexington edition is the most useful as it gives the text of the resolutions offered by Clay and rejected by the meeting.; Locations: DLC. NhD.



Reel: 33
Clay, Cassius Marcellus, 1810-1903.

Speech of Cassius M. Clay, delivered … 30th of December, 1843.

[Cincinnati?]. [1844]

1485D; Another edition [of entry No. 1485], with slightly varying title. 8 p., text printed in double columns. 22 cm.; Caption title similar to that in the broadside edition, with added heading: Facts for the People ---- Extra.; This is a powerful attack on annexation and slavery by one of the leading citizens of Kentucky. That most of those present at its delivery were undoubtedly strong partisans of annexation and slavery meant nothing to Clay, who is characterized by the Dictionary of American Biography as having "unfaltering honesty, indiscreet pugnacity and the wild spirit of the crusader." Clay's rejected resolutions alleged annexation was unconstitutional, a breach of our treaty with Mexico, and a just cause for the dissolution of the Union. The wide circulation of the speech, as shown by the number of editions listed, (entry Nos. 1485-1485F) marks it as one of the most important of the separately published pieces against annexation and its early date, December 30, 1843, tended to focus the attention on annexation which came to a head in 1844. The different editions listed here differ slightly in form and content, some having notes not present in the others. The speech was first printed in the Lexington Observer and reprinted in the Cincinnati Morning Herald for January 12 and 17, 1844. The broadside, "From the Cincinnati Herald," was probably printed at the Cincinnati Herald office, and if so, it is probably the first separate appearance of the speech. Notes in the pamphlet edition with the Lexington edition is the most useful as it gives the text of the resolutions offered by Clay and rejected by the meeting.; Locations: DLC.



Reel: 33
Clay, Cassius Marcellus, 1810-1903.

Speech of Cassius M. Clay, on the Annexation of Texas.

[Cincinnati]. [1844]

1485; [Text begins:] From the Cincinnati Herald. ... We cheerfully yield place this day, that we may present to our readers the speech of Cassius M. Clay. [Editorial comment, followed by Clay's speech with caption:] Speech of C.M. Clay, delivered in a mass meeting of a portion of the citizens of the 8th Congressional district, on Saturday, the 30th of December, 1843, at the White Sulphur Springs, in Scott County, Ky., in reply to Col. R.M. Johnson, and others.; Broadside in seven columns. 74 x 53 cm.; This is a powerful attack on annexation and slavery by one of the leading citizens of Kentucky. That most of those present at its delivery were undoubtedly strong partisans of annexation and slavery meant nothing to Clay, who is characterized by the Dictionary of American Biography as having "unfaltering honesty, indiscreet pugnacity and the wild spirit of the crusader." Clay's rejected resolutions alleged annexation was unconstitutional, a breach of our treaty with Mexico, and a just cause for the dissolution of the Union. The wide circulation of the speech, as shown by the number of editions listed, (entry Nos. 1485-1485F) marks it as one of the most important of the separately published pieces against annexation and its early date, December 30, 1843, tended to focus the attention on annexation which came to a head in 1844. The different editions listed here differ slightly in form and content, some having notes not present in the others. The speech was first printed in the Lexington Observer and reprinted in the Cincinnati Morning Herald for January 12 and 17, 1844. The broadside, "From the Cincinnati Herald," was probably printed at the Cincinnati Herald office, and if so, it is probably the first separate appearance of the speech. Notes in the pamphlet edition with the Lexington edition is the most useful as it gives the text of the resolutions offered by Clay and rejected by the meeting.; Locations: CtY.


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