Texas as a Province and Republic 1795-1845 Author Index



Download 5.84 Mb.
Page14/127
Date conversion28.04.2016
Size5.84 Mb.
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   127

Reel: 1
Chambers, Thomas Jefferson, 1802-1865.

Prospectus for Translating into English and Publishing a Compilation of the Laws in Force in the State of Coahuila and Texas.



[San Felipe de Austin: Printed by G.B. Cotten]. [1832]

27; To be interwoven with a Compendium of the Spanish Code: the whole to be illustrated with notes and references. By T.J. Chambers.; 4-page folder printed on first [3] pages. 24.3 x 20.5 cm.; The prospectus is dated at the end, Austin, February 7, 1832. "The work," says Chambers, "will be published in a large octavo volume of from six to seven hundred pages, and will be delivered to subscribers at twenty five dollars each." Apparently this price was too high, for there is no record of publication. The folder is printed from the same setting of type as the advertisement of it on page [4] of the Texas Gazette for February 28, 1832 (copy in my collection). In this same issue of the Texas Gazette is an advertisement dated, Villa de Austin, December 27, 1831, that Chambers and Ira R. Lewis have "associated themselves together in the practice of their profession and as public agents." Chambers was a colorful character whose name appears several times in this bibliography. According to a somewhat rare Sketch of the Life of Gen. T.J. Chambers, Galveston, 1853 (Winkler, Texas Imprints, No. 373, locating copies with the Texas State Library and the University of Texas; and there is a copy in my collection), Chambers, already a member of the bars of Kentucky and Alabama, came to Mexico City from Alabama in 1826. In due course he was admitted to the bar there and in 1829, as Surveyor General of Coahuila and Texas, accompanied Padilla to Nacogdoches and drafted there the Reglamento issued by Padilla for surveying vacant lands (entry No. 15). Severe criticism of Chambers' opposition to vigorous action against Bradburn at Anahuac in the summer of 1832 led to his publication of his Exposition at Brazoria in 1833 (entry No. 39). The 1853 Sketch of the Life of Chambers claims for him the credit for the reforms for the benefit of Texas passed by the legislature of Coahuila and Texas in 1834. In December, 1834, he was appointed judge for the Texas Circuit, though events made it impossible for his court to act. Chambers was in the limelight again in 1836 and the target of severe criticism when on somewhat doubtful authority he promoted his project for raising troops for his Army of Reserve. Several entries under the year 1836 relate to these activities in his Reply ... to ... Burnet, Houston, 1837 (entry No. 189) he seeks to justify his course. Miss Llerena Beaufort Friend has assembled much information on Chambers in a Master of Arts thesis presented in 1928 which I have enjoyed reading (typewritten copy in the University of Texas library). She comments (p. 2) that "Chambers was supposed, at one time, to have possessed the most valuable library in Texas." Chambers' acquaintance with Mexican officials, together with his legal training and admitted energy, gave him at first quite a position in Texan affairs, but it was not long before his defects of character caused him to be distrusted by many of his fellow Texans. Austin, for example, who at first wrote favorably of Chambers, expressed himself quite differently in a letter of August 25, 1834, to James F. Perry. If Chambers' writings and the contemporary reports of him are any criterion, he was egotistical, pretentious and verbose and, all in all, quite an unlovely character.; Sabin 94947.; Locations: TxU.

Reel: 1
Chambers, Thomas Jefferson, 1802-1865.

Reply of Major-General T. Jefferson Chambers, T.A. to the Newspaper Attack Made against Him, by David G. Burnet, Late President ad interim of the Republic of Texas.

Houston: Printed at the Office of the Telegraph. 1837

189; [13 lines from Byron.]; 81 p. 23 cm. Printed paper wrappers.; Chambers left Texas for the United States early in 1836 to recruit troops under the authority of the ordinance of the General Council of Texas of January, 1836, and a commission from Governor Smith. Though, after San Jacinto, the one thing Texas did not want was more troops, Chambers continued his recruiting, and on June 4, 1837, made a report to the Texas Congress claiming that he had sent over 1,900 men to Texas and had spent $9,035 out of his own pocket. A resolution of Congress thanking Chambers for his service and ordering a settlement of his claims was approved by President Houston on June 12, 1837, though the latter turned down Chambers' claim to hold the rank of Major General (see letter of Houston to Chambers, dated June 24, 1837, Writings of Sam Houston, Vol. II, p. 129-130). The approval of Congress of reimbursement to Chambers outraged former ad interim President Burnet who made a telling attack on him in the Telegraph and Texas Register for August 26, 1837. Burnet insinuates that Chambers left Texas in 1836 to avoid participating in its defense and charges that his commission from the Provisional Government lapsed with the Declaration of Independence on March 2, 1836. This is the Reply of Chambers to the Burnet attack. It is so characteristically bombastic and long-winded that it was quite a chore to read it in the poor print of the photostat copy kindly loaned me by the University of Texas Library. Chambers' defense consists for the most part of abuse of Burnet. This goes on for the first forty or so pages, with the rest of the book devoted to a not at all modest account of the services Chambers had rendered Texas in other matters. There is, however, considerable information on the much criticized land laws passed by the legislature of Coahuila and Texas in 1834 and 1835 which Dr. Barker quotes from in his "Land Speculation as a Cause of the Texas Revolution," Quarterly, Texas State Historical Association, for July, 1906, Vol. X, p. 76-95. Quite a bit of the last part of the Reply is reprinted from p. 28 on in Sketch of the Life of Gen. T.J. Chambers, Galveston, 1853 (referred to with location of copies in the note here to Chambers' Prospectus of 1832, entry No. 27). For a general note on Chambers, see the note to that Prospectus. There are several entries under the year 1836 relating to Chambers' efforts to enlist troops, and especially to the force raised in Kentucky by Messrs. Wilson and Postlethwaite.; Locations: NN (p. 77-81 mutilated, supplied in photostat; lacks wrappers). TxU (lacks outer half of p. 81 and all of back wrapper).



Reel: 2
Chambers, Thomas Jefferson, 1802-1865.

To the Friends of Liberty.

[n.p.]. [1836]

1186; [Circular offering for sale from his own property "25,000 acres of first rate land in 200 shares at $125 a share -- in two tracts on the Eastern margin of the Brasos river in Texas ..." Text begins:] The peculiar and perilous situation in which Texas is at present placed ... makes it necessary that extraordinary measures should be resorted to for means to sustain it. ... [Signed and dated at end:] T. Jefferson Chambers, Gen'l. C.A.R. Lexington, August 4th, 1836.; 4-page folder printed on page [1]. 22 x 20 cm.; Chambers states that the proceeds of this sale will be used to arm "the volunteers I have engaged, and who cannot be marched to the field of action for want of means." The initials after Chambers's name presumably signify Commanding Army Reserve. Evidently the copy of this in my collection was sent by Chambers to Ira R. Lewis, for on page [3] Chambers, under date of Cincinnati 23 August 1836, has written Lewis, who was then in Cincinnati, giving the terms of the proposed land sale and asking Lewis to help. Chambers says a certificate of title is enclosed and that a considerable portion of the land has already been taken in Louisville.; Locations: TWS.



Reel: 24
Chambers, Thomas Jefferson, 1802-1865.

To the Public.

[Louisville: Office of the Louisville Journal]. [1836]

1187A; Another, and possibly earlier, issue [of entry No. 1187] with the general heading "Louisville Journal --- Extra.", and a short introductory paragraph by the editor at the head of the first column. [Louisville: Office of the Louisville Journal. 1836.]; Broadside in five columns. 55 x 41 cm.; The text of Chambers's reply is printed from the same setting of type in both issues, but the type is arranged here to allow for the introductory paragraph. In this issue the caption "To the Public." is printed within the first column, at the beginning of the reply, rather than as a general heading. See the note to Chambers's Documents, Louisville, 1836, entry No. 1184.; Locations: TWS.



Reel: 24
Chambers, Thomas Jefferson, 1802-1865.

To the Public.

[Louisville: Office of the Louisville Journal]. [1836]

1187; [Reply to the attack, published in the Lexington Gazette of September 12, 1836, by Edward J. Wilson and G.L. Postlethwaite upon the Texan government and himself. Text begins:] It is with regret that I find myself compelled to appear before the public, to refute the calumnies with which a few disappointed adventures returned from Texas, have endeavored to defame my fellow-countrymen ... [Signed:] T. Jefferson Chambers.; Broadside in five columns. 55 x 41 cm.; The text of Chambers's reply is printed from the same setting of type in both issues (entry Nos. 1187 and 1187A), but the type is arranged here to allow for the introductory paragraph. In this issue the caption "To the Public." is printed within the first column, at the beginning of the reply, rather than as a general heading. See the note to Chambers's Documents, Louisville, 1836, entry No. 1184.; Locations: TxU.



Reel: 24
Chambers, Thomas Jefferson, 1802-1865, and others.

Documents connected with the Late Controversy between Gen. T.J. Chambers of Texas, and Messrs. Wilson & Postlethwaite of Kentucky.

Louisville: Prentice & Weissinger, Printers. 1836

1184; 27 p. 21 cm. Printed paper wrappers. Wrapper title substantially the same. This entry, also Important Documents, which immediately follows, and the two editions of Chambers's To the Public (entry Nos. 1187 and 1187A) all relate to the acrimonious controversy between T. Jefferson Chambers and Messrs. Wilson and Postlethwaite of Kentucky. These two gentlemen arrived at Galveston with volunteers in July, 1836, and having, as they say, been treated with great incivility by President Burnet returned to Kentucky in high dudgeon and issued a slashing attack on Texas land speculators, General Chambers and the people of Texas generally. This was published in the Lexington Gazette of September 12, 1836. Chambers replied in an equally vitriolic statement which led Messrs. Wilson and Postlethwaite to put a card in the Lexington papers calling Chambers "a Liar, a Poltroon, and a Coward." In Documents, the statement of Colonel Wilson and Captain Postlethwaite is given at pages [3]-7, followed by the Chambers reply with caption "To the Public" at pages 7-21. From pages 21 to the end there are proceedings of a "Court of honor" which sought to settle the dispute without a duel. Important Documents, after a four-line introduction dated Natchez, Oct. 28, 1836, signed "Editor Courier," continues, pages [3]-15, with a reprinting of pages [3]-19 of Documents. The Wilson and Postlethwaite statement, dated October 7, calling Chambers "a Liar, a Poltroon, and a Coward," and Chambers's reply of October 9 follow, together with additional material on the Chambers side, including a long letter of Ira R. Lewis. To the Public is for the most part reprinting from Documents and Important Documents, with various additions to the statement "To the Public" of the two earlier publications. Entered as entry No. 189 is a rather weak reply of Chambers to a telling attack made on him by former president Burnet, printed in the Telegraph and Texas Register for August 26, 1837, for his recruiting activities for Texas in Kentucky and elsewhere. There is a brief account of those activities and of Chambers's defense in the note to entry No. 189 and see also the entries for the year 1836 under Texas (republic). Army of Reserve (entry Nos. 1240, 1241 and 1242). Miss Llerena Friend has a good account of the controversy between Chambers and Messrs. Wilson and Postlethwaite, and of the subsequent controversy between him and President Burnet, in her Master of Arts thesis of June, 1928, "The Life of Thomas Jefferson Chambers," on file in the University of Texas Library. It appears from Miss Friend's account that after Chambers became involved in the new controversy with President Burnet he decided that Wilson had been badly treated by Burnet and subsequently tendered Wilson an apology. For a general note on Chambers, see the note to entry No. 27, his Prospectus for publishing the laws of Coahuila and Texas.; Sabin 95079.; Locations: TxU. TxWFM. TWS.



Reel: 24
Chambers, Thomas Jefferson, 1802-1865, and others.

Important Documents, concerning Texas and the Controversy between General T.J. Chambers and Messrs. Wilson and Postlethwaite.

Natchez: Courier & Journal Office. 1836

1185; 24 p. 27 cm. Stitched.; See the note to Chambers's Documents, Louisville, 1836, entry No. 1184.; Sabin 95093.; Locations: MBAt. TxU. TWS.



Reel: 24
Chambersia. Proprietors.

Certificate for Two Lots in the City of Chambersia.

[Houston: Printed at the Telegraph Office?]. [1840]

382; Minimum Value of the Two, $100. Assignable by Endorsement. ... City of Chambersia, [Blank for date, and signature.] [Certificate at head of sheet, within rule border, followed by title bond describing the property being sold, dated April 20, 1840, and with printed signature, "T. Jefferson Chambers.", the bond followed by a certificate of registration.]; Broadside. 29.2 x 20.9 cm.; At left and right, respectively, of value in title of certificate: No. ----- [and] Book -----. It appears from the title bond that General Chambers had conveyed an interest in land he owned "on the north-eastern shore of Galveston Bay in front of the mouths of the Trinity river" to a group having a project for selling lots in a town to be established there to be called "City of Chambersia." I have not run across any other mention of this project. In the only copy located the certificate has the manuscript signature of T. Jefferson Chambers, with the date June 2nd, 1840, filled in.; Locations: Privately owned copy on loan at TxHSJM.



Reel: 6
Le Champ d'Asyle, Dithyrambe. … 1819.

See entry No. 1070.


Le Champ-d'Asile, au Texas … Par C----- D-----. … [1820?].

See entry No. 1077.


Le Champ-D'Asile, Tableau ... du Texas … Par L.F. LH. ----- ----- 1819.

See entry No. 1072.


Channing, William Ellery.

Carta al Honorable Henrique Clay …, Mégico [1837].

See entry No. 1266C.
Channing, William Ellery, 1780-1842.

Carta al Honorable Henrique Clay sobre la agregacion de Tejas a los Estados-Unidos, por Guillermo E. Channing.

Mégico. Librería de Galvan, Portal de Agustinos núm. 3. [On verso of title:] Mégico. Imprenta a cargo de Mariano Arevalo, Calle de Cadena num. 2. 1837

1266C; An edition [of entry No. 1266] in Spanish, printed in Mexico; … Traducida del Ingles.; 63 p. 21 cm. Printed paper wrappers.; Wrapper title, Carta de Channing sobre la agregacion de Tejas a los Estados-Unidos. Megico. Imprenta de Galvan, vignette at head of title and vignette of Liberty on verso of back wrapper, within ornamental border.; Justin H. Smith in his The Annexation of Texas, New York, 1919, devotes pages 14-19 to an analysis of this Letter, saying "it exerted a wonderful influence in the United States, Europe and Mexico and still echoes in current books and in public sentiment." As Smith points out, Channing is quite incorrect in saying that the fundamental reasons for the Texas revolution were land speculation and desire to prevent the abolition of slavery. For works relating to Channing's Letter, see: [Hammeken, George Louis], Brief Remarks ... (entry No. 1275), Review of Dr. Channing's Letter ... (entry No. 1288), Strictures on "A Letter to ... Clay ..." (entry No. 1292), and [Whitaker, Daniel Kimball], Sidney's Letters to ... Channing ... (entry No. 1303).; Sabin 11913.; Locations: C-S. CU-B. CtY. DLC. ICU. TxU. TWS.



Reel: 25
Channing, William Ellery, 1780-1842.

Dr. Channing's Letter to the Hon. Henry Clay, on the Annexation of Texas to the United States.

[n.p.]. [1837]

1266D; Another edition [of entry No. 1266] with caption title; 48 p.; Justin H. Smith in his The Annexation of Texas, New York, 1919, devotes pages 14-19 to an analysis of this Letter, saying "it exerted a wonderful influence in the United States, Europe and Mexico and still echoes in current books and in public sentiment." As Smith points out, Channing is quite incorrect in saying that the fundamental reasons for the Texas revolution were land speculation and desire to prevent the abolition of slavery. For works relating to Channing's Letter, see: [Hammeken, George Louis], Brief Remarks ... (entry No. 1275), Review of Dr. Channing's Letter ... (entry No. 1288), Strictures on "A Letter to ... Clay ..." (entry No. 1292), and [Whitaker, Daniel Kimball], Sidney's Letters to ... Channing ... (entry No. 1303).; Locations: ICU. TxSa.



Reel: 25
Channing, William Ellery, 1780-1842.

A Letter to the Hon. Henry Clay, on the Annexation of Texas to the United States.

Boston: James Munroe and Company. [On verso of title:] Cambridge Press: Metcalf, Torry, and Ballour. 1837

1266; 72 p. 21 cm. Printed paper wrappers.; Wrapper title same; advt. of publishers on verso of back wrapper. Not entered separately are issues designated on their title pages as "Second" through "Sixth" editions, but otherwise with the same title, imprint and collation, the sheets for the text being the same. Copies of all but the "Third Edition" are in the Library of Congress. The New-York Historical Society has a copy of the "Third Edition" in wrappers and there is another, without the wrappers, at Yale. Justin H. Smith in his The Annexation of Texas, New York, 1919, devotes pages 14-19 to an analysis of this Letter, saying "it exerted a wonderful influence in the United States, Europe and Mexico and still echoes in current books and in public sentiment." As Smith points out, Channing is quite incorrect in saying that the fundamental reasons for the Texas revolution were land speculation and desire to prevent the abolition of slavery. For works relating to Channing's Letter, see: [Hammeken, George Louis], Brief Remarks ... (entry No. 1275), Review of Dr. Channing's Letter ... (entry No. 1288), Strictures on "A Letter to ... Clay ..." (entry No. 1292), and [Whitaker, Daniel Kimball], Sidney's Letters to ... Channing ... (entry No. 1303).; Rader 654. Raines, p. 48. Sabin 11912.; Locations: CSmH. CU-B. DLC. MH. NHi. NN. Tx. TxDa. TxDaM. TxFw. TxH. TxSa. TxU. TxWB. TWS. Also other libraries.



Reel: 25
Channing, William Ellery, 1780-1842.

A Letter to the Hon. Henry Clay, on the Annexation of Texas to the United States.

Glasgow: James Hedderwick & Son. London: Simpkin, Marshall, & Co. Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd. [At end:] Glasgow: James Hedderwick and Son, Printers. 1837

1266A; Another edition [of entry No. 1266] printed in Glasgow ... By William E. Channing, D.D. (Reprinted from the Fourth Boston Edition.); 52 p. 18 cm.; Justin H. Smith in his The Annexation of Texas, New York, 1919, devotes pages 14-19 to an analysis of this Letter, saying "it exerted a wonderful influence in the United States, Europe and Mexico and still echoes in current books and in public sentiment." As Smith points out, Channing is quite incorrect in saying that the fundamental reasons for the Texas revolution were land speculation and desire to prevent the abolition of slavery. For works relating to Channing's Letter, see: [Hammeken, George Louis], Brief Remarks ... (entry No. 1275), Review of Dr. Channing's Letter ... (entry No. 1288), Strictures on "A Letter to ... Clay ..." (entry No. 1292), and [Whitaker, Daniel Kimball], Sidney's Letters to ... Channing ... (entry No. 1303).; Sabin 11912.; Locations: CU-B. DLC. MB. MH. TxU. TWS.



Reel: 25
Channing, William Ellery, 1780-1842.

Thoughts on the evils of a spirit of conquest, and on slavery. A Letter on the Annexation of Texas to the United States.

London: John Green, 121, Newgate Street. [On verso of title and at end:] Printed by Richard Kinder, Great New Street, Fetter Lane. 1837

1266B; Another edition [of entry No. 1266], printed in London; ... By William E. Channing, D.D. [Quotation, three lines.]; 48 p. 22 cm. Printed paper wrappers.; Wrapper title similar; advt. on verso of back wrapper.; Justin H. Smith in his The Annexation of Texas, New York, 1919, devotes pages 14-19 to an analysis of this Letter, saying "it exerted a wonderful influence in the United States, Europe and Mexico and still echoes in current books and in public sentiment." As Smith points out, Channing is quite incorrect in saying that the fundamental reasons for the Texas revolution were land speculation and desire to prevent the abolition of slavery. For works relating to Channing's Letter, see: [Hammeken, George Louis], Brief Remarks ... (entry No. 1275), Review of Dr. Channing's Letter ... (entry No. 1288), Strictures on "A Letter to ... Clay ..." (entry No. 1292), and [Whitaker, Daniel Kimball], Sidney's Letters to ... Channing ... (entry No. 1303).; Locations: CSmH. CU-B. DLC. MH. NHi. NN. TxGR. TxH. TxSa. TWS. Also other libraries.



Reel: 25
Cheves, Langdon, 1776-1857.

Letter of the Hon. Langdon Cheves, to the Editors of the Charleston Mercury, Sept. 11, 1844.

[At end:] Printed by Walker & Burke, No. 3 Broad-street. [Charleston, South Carolina]. [1844]

1482; 15 p. 23 cm.; Caption title. This is primarily an appeal, with hints of secession, to the South to unite against the oppression of the protective tariff and the threats to its "peculiar institutions," from the fanatic zeal of the abolitionists. Three pages or so (12-14) are devoted to the recent rejection by the Senate of the Annexation of Texas treaty. This is called an act "of egregious folly" and Cheves lets his imagination run wild on the disastrous results which may ensue. Cheves, then a retired elder statesman, was a distinguished son of South Carolina. There is an article on him in the Dictionary of American Biography. This was reprinted in Southern State Rights ... Tract No. I (entry No. 1535). See also A Reply to the Letter of the Hon. Langdon Cheves, 1844 (entry No. 1536).; Locations: CtY. DLC. NHi. NN. TxU. TWS.



Reel: 33
Chewning, J.J.

To the Public.

[Vicksburg]. [1839]

1345; [A defense, with supporting documents, of certain official acts by Chewning, late president of the Commercial & Rail-Road Bank of Vicksburg. Text begins:] I promised the public some time since that if their curiosity demanded an expose of my connection with the negociation lately determined between the Rail-Road Bank of this City and the Texian Government for a loan of Five Hundred Thousand Dollars, that I would take an early opportunity to gratify it ... [Signed and dated at end:] J.J. Chewning. April 30th 1839.; Broadside in two columns. 31 x 19 cm.; This is an account of a proposition for a loan of $500,000 to Texas made, undoubtedly at the instigation of Chewning, by the directors of the Commercial & Rail-Road Bank of Vicksburg, early in December, 1838. Chewning had been charged with planning a secret profit for himself out of the transaction and this is his defense. His advocacy of the loan does look suspicious in view of the fact that Texas securities were at the time selling at a large discount. Part of his defense was that one of the conditions he had stipulated was that notes of the Vicksburg bank should be accepted at par by Texas for all public dues. The loan was not made, but perhaps Henry Thompson, private secretary early in 1839 to President Lamar, was referring to this offer when he stated on page 12 of his Texas ... by Milam (entry No. 1357), "Let it also be recollected that the government of Texas has Five Hundred Thousand Dollars to her credit in one of the Banks at New Orleans." For an interesting account of Chewning, see Willie D. Halsell's "A Vicksburg Speculator and Planter in the Yazoo Delta" (Journal of Mississippi History, Vol. II, 1949 p. 231-242).; Locations: TWS.


1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   127


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page