Texas as a Province and Republic 1795-1845 Author Index



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Reel: 35
Castro, Henri, 1786-1865?.

Le Texas en 1845.



[At lower right, below border of type ornaments and on verso of title:] Anvers. - Imprimerie de J.-E. Buschmann. [1845?]

1570A; An edition [of entry No. 1570] in French and German, with title: Le Texas en 1845. [etc. as in No. 1570, followed on the same page by title in German:] Texas in 1845. Castro-Stadt eine Französische Colonie, welche. am I September 1844, am Flusse Medina, 24 Meilen westlich von San-Antonio de Bexar, durch Heinrich Castro gegrundet worden ist. [German version of quotation.]; [At lower right, below border of type ornaments, and on verso of title:] Anvers.--Imprimerie de J.-E. Buschmann. [1845?]; 39 p., view and plan (both folding). 24 cm.; Text in French and German on opposite pages.; The view and the plan (which here is lithographed by Lutton) are the same as those in entry No. 1570.; At the outset it should be stated that the text of entry Nos. 1570, 1570A and 1570B of this pamphlet is substantially the same in all three except that the separate German text does not include "Journal des Débats. Extrait du 7 Mai 1845," with which the separate French text ends. Le Texas en 1845 is the account of the settlement established by Castro in September, 1844, on the grant on the Medina River covered by his colonization contract with Texas of February 15, 1842. For the story of his trials and tribulations in the two and a half years between the closing of the colonization contract and this settlement on the Medina one should read Le Texas, (entry No. 1571), where, in "Mon Procès," Castro gives a graphic account of his tribulations, and a defense of his conduct. In Le Texas en 1845 a glowing summary of conditions in Texas is followed (p. 7-20) by a section entitled "Fondation de Castroville. Pièces officielles dont le dépót est fait chez M. Jaussand, notaire à Paris." This includes Castro's report to Secretary of State Anson Jones of September 15, 1844, of his setting forth from San Antonio for the Medina on September 1, 1844, at the head of his colonists, the "Procèsverbal," signed by over 40 colonists, of taking possession of this new settlement named Castroville, the certificate by Bishop Odin of laying the cornerstone of the new church, Castro's proclamation on his leaving Castroville on November 20, an address made to him by his colonists on that day, and proclamation made by Castro before his departure for Europe. At the end is a long quotation from Kennedy's Texas, Kennedy being described as then British Consul at Texas. This important collection of documents relating to his colonization project was apparently published by Castro to use in his appeal from legal proceedings brought against him in Strasbourg for neglect of his colonists. Le Texas en 1845 and Le Texas published later in 1845, (entry No. 1571), give much of the contemporary material on the Castro projects. The pamphlet entered here under [Castro, Henri, compiler.] (entry No. 1450), gives documents written late in 1843, that apparently have not previously been referred to. A Memorial of Henry Castro to the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Texas, Austin, 1849 (not recorded in Mr. Winkler's Check List of Texas Imprints) gives the text of two important letters of Castro to President Houston giving accounts of his project, one dated "Galveston, June, 1844," the other "Castroville, October, 1844," and a later Memorial, San Antonio, 1855 (Winkler, Check List, 557), gives the form of contract used by Castro with his colonists. An interesting account of the Castro Colony is given by his son, Lorenzo Castro, in Immigration from Alsace-Lorraine, a Brief Sketch of Henry Castro's Colony in Western Texas, New York, 1871. Lorenzo states there that his father was the author of Coup d'Oeil ... sur le Texas, Paris, 1841 (entry No. 1378), entered here, it is believed correctly, under Fournel, and of "Documents on Foreign Commerce," entered here under France, Ministére de l'Agriculture et du Commerce (entry No. 1455), "and many others, some being translated into German." (See also Henri Castro, compiler, entry No. 1450.) Castro's manuscript diary for the years 1841-1844, now in the University of Texas Library, was used by Audrey G. Goldthorp in an excellent thesis, "Castro's Colony," presented to the University of Texas in 1928, and by Julia Nott Waugh in her Castro-Ville and Henry Castro Empresario, San Antonio, 1934. Mrs. Waugh's account is helpful because of its printing of a translation into English of Auguste Frétellière's manuscript in the University of Texas Library, "Adventures of a Castrovillian." Considerable light is thrown on Castro's affairs in the well indexed references to him in Garrison's Diplomatic Correspondence of the Republic of Texas, Washington, 1911. Neither Mrs. Waugh nor Lorenzo Castro gives the date of Castro's death. Miss Goldthorp gives it as 1861 and a note on Castro in the Writings of Sam Houston (Vol. II, p. 441-442) states indirectly that it was in 1870. The account of Castro in the Handbook of Texas implies that the date was 1865.; Rader 3085. Raines, p. 46. Sabin 95121.; Locations: DLC. TxU.

Reel: 35
Castro, Henri, 1786-1865?.

Texas im Jahre 1845.



[Anvers?]. [1845?]

1570B; A separate edition of the German text of the edition in French and German [entry No. 1570A], with title: Texas im Jahre 1845. Castrostadt, eine französische Colonie, welche am 8. September 1844 am Flusse Medina, 24 Meilen westlich von San Antonio de Bexar, durch Heinrich Castro begründet worden ist. [Line from Plutarch.] [Cut of American eagle.] [18] p. 22 cm.; At the outset it should be stated that the text of entry Nos. 1570, 1570A and 1570B of this pamphlet is substantially the same in all three except that the separate German text does not include "Journal des Débats. Extrait du 7 Mai 1845," with which the separate French text ends. Le Texas en 1845 is the account of the settlement established by Castro in September, 1844, on the grant on the Medina River covered by his colonization contract with Texas of February 15, 1842. For the story of his trials and tribulations in the two and a half years between the closing of the colonization contract and this settlement on the Medina one should read Le Texas, (entry No. 1571), where, in "Mon Procès," Castro gives a graphic account of his tribulations, and a defense of his conduct. In Le Texas en 1845 a glowing summary of conditions in Texas is followed (p. 7-20) by a section entitled "Fondation de Castroville. Pièces officielles dont le dépót est fait chez M. Jaussand, notaire à Paris." This includes Castro's report to Secretary of State Anson Jones of September 15, 1844, of his setting forth from San Antonio for the Medina on September 1, 1844, at the head of his colonists, the "Procèsverbal," signed by over 40 colonists, of taking possession of this new settlement named Castroville, the certificate by Bishop Odin of laying the cornerstone of the new church, Castro's proclamation on his leaving Castroville on November 20, an address made to him by his colonists on that day, and proclamation made by Castro before his departure for Europe. At the end is a long quotation from Kennedy's Texas, Kennedy being described as then British Consul at Texas. This important collection of documents relating to his colonization project was apparently published by Castro to use in his appeal from legal proceedings brought against him in Strasbourg for neglect of his colonists. Le Texas en 1845 and Le Texas published later in 1845, (entry No. 1571), give much of the contemporary material on the Castro projects. The pamphlet entered here under [Castro, Henri, compiler.] (entry No. 1450), gives documents written late in 1843, that apparently have not previously been referred to. A Memorial of Henry Castro to the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Texas, Austin, 1849 (not recorded in Mr. Winkler's Check List of Texas Imprints) gives the text of two important letters of Castro to President Houston giving accounts of his project, one dated "Galveston, June, 1844," the other "Castroville, October, 1844," and a later Memorial, San Antonio, 1855 (Winkler, Check List, 557), gives the form of contract used by Castro with his colonists. An interesting account of the Castro Colony is given by his son, Lorenzo Castro, in Immigration from Alsace-Lorraine, a Brief Sketch of Henry Castro's Colony in Western Texas, New York, 1871. Lorenzo states there that his father was the author of Coup d'Oeil ... sur le Texas, Paris, 1841 (entry No. 1378), entered here, it is believed correctly, under Fournel, and of "Documents on Foreign Commerce," entered here under France, Ministére de l'Agriculture et du Commerce (entry No. 1455), "and many others, some being translated into German." (See also Henri Castro, compiler, entry No. 1450.) Castro's manuscript diary for the years 1841-1844, now in the University of Texas Library, was used by Audrey G. Goldthorp in an excellent thesis, "Castro's Colony," presented to the University of Texas in 1928, and by Julia Nott Waugh in her Castro-Ville and Henry Castro Empresario, San Antonio, 1934. Mrs. Waugh's account is helpful because of its printing of a translation into English of Auguste Frétellière's manuscript in the University of Texas Library, "Adventures of a Castrovillian." Considerable light is thrown on Castro's affairs in the well indexed references to him in Garrison's Diplomatic Correspondence of the Republic of Texas, Washington, 1911. Neither Mrs. Waugh nor Lorenzo Castro gives the date of Castro's death. Miss Goldthorp gives it as 1861 and a note on Castro in the Writings of Sam Houston (Vol. II, p. 441-442) states indirectly that it was in 1870. The account of Castro in the Handbook of Texas implies that the date was 1865.; Locations: TxU.

Reel: 35
Castro, Henri, 1786-1865?.

Le Texas par H. Castro.

Anvers, Imprimerie de J.-E. Buschmann. 1845

1571; [Ornament, laurel wreath with star in center.]; Leaf of title, 38 p., leaf of errata.; The No. 1570 entry, Le Texas en 1845, gives an account of the founding of Castroville in September, 1844, on a tract granted by Texas for colonization in February, 1842. Castro had left Paris for Texas in May, 1844, to establish the new settlement and in his absence his enemies had procured a judgment against him in a court at Strasbourg to the effect, according to Castro (only his account of the proceedings seems to be known), that his colony was "a chimera" and his promotion of it had been dishonest. Le Texas is in two parts, the first entitled "Notice Historique du Texas" (p. 7-16), and the second, "Mon Procès. Au public.--Juge des Juges" (p. 17-38). Part II is a vigorous defense by Castro of his colony and of his conduct in promoting it, and an account of his first interest in Texas through his negotiation of the Texas loan with Laffitt & Co. in 1841. This was followed by a short stay in Texas in the early months of 1842 when Houston made him Consul General for Texas in France and signed the colonization contract of February 15. Much of his defense is given in an address (p. 27-35) headed, "A La Cour Royale de Colmar." There he emphasizes his sending over 600 colonists to Texas in 1843 and 1844, giving names of their ships and dates of sailing, and touches as lightly as possible on the inadequate steps taken to receive them in Texas, and on the small number actually settling on his grant. He defends his requirement of deposit from prospective colonists. Without mentioning them by name, he brings out the bitter hostility shown to him and his project by Saligny, the French envoy to Texas, and his successor Crayamel, and tells how they secured the quashing of his appointment as Consul General. Apparently the court at Colmar had reversed in some fashion the judgment of the court at Strasbourg for he concludes that notwithstanding he has no recourse for the damage his enemies had inflicted. Though Castro's address to the Court at Colmar reads well, the sufferings due to his neglect of his colonists on their arrival at Texas, particularly of a group that arrived at Lavaca from Galveston just before Easter, 1844, and the publicity given to this by Prince Solms in a letter to Germany (Biesele, German Settlements, p. 107, note 31) cast a stain on his record that he could not erase.; Rader 626. Sabin 11453.; Locations, with main title, no leaf of errata: TxU.; Locations, with errata but no main title: DLC. TxU.



Reel: 35
[Castro, Henri, 1786-1865?, compiler].

... Urkunden über der auswärtigen Handel.

[n.p.]. [1843?]

1450; Texas. Handelswesen No. 1.; 22 p., blank leaf. 19 cm.; Caption title.; At head of title: Ministerium des Ackerbau's und des Handels. 3te Serie der verschiedenen Berichte. No. 41. In its title and first 16 pages this pamphlet is a translation into German of the title, preface and parts of the "Notes sur le Texas, Juillet, 1842" in Documens [sic] (entry No. 1455). Included in the final pages, 17-22, is a statement dated Antwerp, December 4, 1843, signed by a group of Castro colonists embarking for Texas on the ship Henry, praising their accommodations on the ship and the arrangements made for them thus far. There is also a letter dated Mannheim, December 13, 1843, from one Samuel Haas, who had lived in Texas for seven years and was soon returning, extolling the opportunities in trade and agriculture in Texas, especially in the region around San Antonio. The letter was to August Huth, whose son Ludwig had sailed for Galveston November 5 to act as agent for Castro. In this German translation from parts of the "Notes sur le Texas" referred to above, the writer has interpolated in parentheses the words, "Castro und Kompagnie," in the listing of the third concession on page 12 of the French edition. At first blush it was quite confusing to meet with this attribution to Castro of a concession which almost certainly was that granted to his rival, Bourgeois d'Orvanne, on June 3, 1842, and that was played up by Bourgeois in his Compagnie Générale prospectus (entry No. 1452). This confusion was increased by the fact that Castro's son Lorenzo published in New York in 1871, Immigration from Alsace and Lorraine. A brief sketch of the history of Castro's colony in Western Texas where Documents on Foreign Commerce (entry No. 1455) is said to have been one of the pamphlets published by his father. The answer seems to be that Castro or his agent wanted to use a brief description of Texas as a preface to the letters or statements made late in 1843 favorable to the Castro enterprise that he was planning to publish, so he seized upon the first 12 pages of the pamphlet of the French ministry and interpolated "Castro und Kompagnie" in the listing on page 12 of the concession "in the garden of Texas." This could easily be done as part of the southern boundary of the Bourgeois concession was the northern boundary of the Castro concession. The statement of Lorenzo may be due to his having knowledge of this German pamphlet only, or just to a plain error. This may have been the earliest promotion pamphlet of Castro which has survived. For general references to Castro's project, see the note to his Le Texas in 1845 (entry No. 1570).; Locations: TWS.



Reel: 32
[Castro, Henri? 1786-1865?].

Colonie in der Provinz St. Antonio de Bexar, im Westen des Freistaates Texas in Nordamerika.

[Neufreystädt am Rhein?]. [1845]

1569; 1845. [Circular published to promote emigration to Castroville, the colony established by Henri Castro in September, 1844, Huth & Comp. of Neufreystädt am Rhein, in Baden, being designated as agents. Text begins:] Besagte Colonie ist laut vorliegenden Urkunden am 2ten September 1844 durch Herrn Heinrich Castro, sowohl auf dem durch ihn acquerirten, als ihm von Seiten der Texanischen Regierung am 15ten Februar 1842 concedirt wordenen Grund und Boden an der Medina, 8 Stunden westlich von St. Antonio de Bezar, begründet worden. … ; Broadside in two columns. 44 x 28 cm.; This interesting prospectus tells of the founding of Castroville on September 2, 1844, and offers attractive terms to "upright and industrious people through whose robust work the flourishing of the colony will be assured." Every family is to receive 320 acres of land, the only payments required being the costs of transportation from Neufreystädt on the Rhine, in the Grand Duchy of Baden, via Antwerp to Galveston. These costs for different age groups are not filled out in the prospectus. The emigrant must also pay the cost of transportation from Galveston to the colony. The circular states what the emigrant should bring with him and says that by early application the emigrant can secure passage on the next ship, "for when concession contracts have been issued to 120 to 130 persons, the list must be closed and the expedition put under way." This circular was probably issued after the charges made against Castro for requiring deposits from his proposed colonists, other than for transportation, had been aired in the court at Strasbourg. See note to Le Texas (entry No. 1571). There is a photostat of this broadside in the University of Texas Library and in my collection, but their source has not been recorded. Though no author is given, it is probable that this prospectus was written by or for Henri Castro. For date of his death, see note to his Le Texas en 1845, Anvers, 1845 (entry No. 1570).



Reel: 35
Castro, Henry, 1786-1865.

The Memorial of Henry Castro, to the Honorable the Senators and Representatives, of the Republic of Texas, in Congress Assembled.

Printed at the Texas National Register Office. [Washington]. [1844]

585; 11 p. 21.5 cm.; This Memorial includes two reports by Castro to President Sam Houston, the first dated Galveston June, 1844, p. [3]-8, and the second dated Castroville October, 1844, p. 8-10. There follows a petition by Castro that his contract be extended. This is the first separate printing which has come down to us giving any account of Castro's Texas colony, the first settlement west of San Antonio and one of the most colorful of the Texas colonization projects of the 1840's. The date 1844 is inferred from the fact that the act granting an extension of time to Castro passed the House December 31, 1844. Presumably the Memorial had been printed by that time. Under authority of an amendment of February 5, 1842, to an earlier colonization act of February 4, 1841, two grants were made to Castro on February 15, 1842, and grants were likewise made to C.F. Mercer and others, as shown by entries here. One of the February 15, 1842, grants to Castro was on the Rio Grande River and was never settled by him. The other which Castro colonized was a large area west of San Antonio in what in 1871 were parts of Medina, Uvalde, Frio, Atacoso, Bexar, McMullen, Lasalle and Zavala counties. Castro's letter of June, 1844, from Galveston is a very skillful effort. It emphasizes his success in rounding up colonists in Europe--he proudly states that so far he had sent to Texas seven ships with 700 people--notwithstanding the two Mexican raids of 1842, and politely points out that putting his colonists in possession of their lands had been delayed by circumstances beyond his control. He closes by asking the government to aid him in taking this possession by giving his colonists protection. His second letter from Castroville of October, 1844, tells of the founding of the town and asks for a three-year extension of his contract. There was so much justice in Castro's claims and he handled his affairs so well before Congress that the extension act became a law on January 27, 1845.; Locations: Tx. TxH.



Reel: 9
[Cazneau, Jane (McManus) Storms, 1807-1878].

Texas and Her Presidents.

New-York: E. Winchester, New World Press, XXIV Ann-Street. 1845

1572; With a Glance at Her Climate and Agricultural Capabilities. By Corinne Montgomery [pseudonym]. [Two lines from Henry Clay.]; Leaf of title, vi, [9]-122 p., advts. [4] p., 3 portraits. 17 cm. Printed paper wrappers.; Wrapper title same with the following added below imprint: Price Twenty-five Cents. Advts. on verso of back wrapper. Portrait of Lamar as frontispiece, and portraits of Sam Houston and Branch T. Archer facing p. [111] and 122 respectively. As far as its short general account of Texas history and physical features are concerned this book is of little or no value; indeed there are one or two quite incorrect statements on non-controversial matters. It is important, however, as showing the opinion of an intelligent contemporary on Burnet and his successors. Burnet and Lamar come off well, with Houston characterized in one instance as "drunk, wavering and unreliable." In an Appendix beginning at page 113 there is a scathing sketch of Houston and a short note on Anson Jones, both said by Mrs. Cazneau to be by "a high authority," and an appreciative sketch by her of Branch T. Archer. At the beginning there is a four-page introduction by Mrs. Cazneau on how annexation came about. She gives the New York Sun the credit of starting, in June, 1843, the movement for annexation. Senator Walker's Letter (entry No. 1556), is called "masterly and unanswerable." Raines and Sabin enter this under either Cora or Corinne Montgomery, with no indication of its being a pseudonym. A sketch of her interesting career is entered in the Handbook of Texas under her maiden name of Jane McManus. William L. Cazneau whom she had married by 1850 was active in the Texas Congress and later on engaged in various colonization schemes in Texas, the West Indies, and Central America. One of these was to establish a town site at Eagle Pass on the Rio Grande. This is the subject of Mrs. Cazneau's better known book, Eagle Pass; or Life on the Border, New York, 1852. Parts of Texas and Her Presidents were published in the U.S. Democratic Review for March, 1845, Volume XVI, at pages 282-291 [Handbook says 1849].; Raines, p. 151. Sabin 50135.; Locations, with wrappers and main title: CtY (lacks back wrapper). MWA. NjP (lacks back wrapper and portraits). NN (lacks Lamar portrait).; Locations, lacking wrappers: NHi (lacks Lamar portrait). NcD.



Reel: 35
[Cazneau, Mrs. William Leslie].

Texas and Her Presidents … By Corinne Montgomery [pseudonym].

See [Cazneau, Jane (McManus) Storms], entry No. 1572.
Celebrad mejicanos valientes la brillante jornada de Mier!.

[n.p.]. [1842?]

975.1; Nuestros bravos alli domeñaron del tejano orgulloso el poder ...; Broadside 31 x 21.6 cm.; Title from beginning of text. Six stanzas of verse and refrain, celebrating the defeat of the Texan Mier expedition. Though unsigned and undated, this was probably printed in late December 1842 or January 1843.

Reel: 15
Central Committee.

See entry No. 50.


Chambers, Thomas Jefferson.

See also Texas (republic). Army of Reserve, entry Nos. 1240-1242.


Chambers, Thomas Jefferson, 1802-1865.

Exposition of the Part Taken by T.J. Chambers, in the difficulties of Texas in the summer of the past year; and His Views upon the Present Most Interesting Measure of Separating Texas from Coahuila and Making It a State.

Brazoria: Printed by D.W. Anthony. 1833

39; [Four lines from Horace.] San Felipe de Austin, April, 1833.; 27 p. 18.3 cm.; Chambers had been opposed to the use of force against Bradburn at Anahuac in June, 1832, and to the passage of the resolutions at Turtle Bayou which aligned the colonists with Santa Anna and against Bustamante. As a result he and S.M. Williams were hanged in effigy at Brazoria by the war party there. In this terribly long-winded Exposition, Chambers attempts a defense of his conduct, and then continues with an elaborate argument for the separation of Texas from Coahuila. The Exposition is important as a contemporary account of the Anahuac affair, and its discussion of the most unsatisfactory status of the relation of Texas to Coahuila may have been a factor in the reform legislation of 1834. The Sketch of the Life of Gen. T.J. Chambers, Galveston, 1853, says (p. 27) that the Mexican government had the pamphlet translated into Spanish and as a result warned the state authorities "that the wants and necessities of Texas must be provided for, or she would be permitted to separate and become a state." Austin has a long reference to this Chambers pamphlet in his well-known letter of August 25, 1834, written from Mexico (entry No. 43), and Dr. Barker shows its rarity by remarking in a footnote to the printing of the letter in the Austin Papers (Vol. II, p. 1077), "No copy of this important pamphlet is known to exist." See entry for Chambers' Prospectus, No. 27, for a general note on him.; Sabin 95082.; Locations: TWS.


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