Texas as a Province and Republic 1795-1845 Author Index



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Breves Reflexiones sobre el Análisis … del Proyecto de ley ... para proporcionar arbitrios para la guerra de Tejas.

See note to entry No. 965.


Brief Remarks on Dr. Channing's Letter to Hon. Henry Clay. 1837.

See [Hammeken, George Louis], entry No. 1275.


Bringas de Manzaneda y Encinas, Diego Miguel, fl. 1792-1819.

Sermon Que en las Solemnes Honras Celebradas en Obsequio de los W. PP. Predicadores Apostólicos Fr. Francisco Tomas Hermenegildo Garcés: ... [and three others] Misioneros del Colegio de Propaganda fide de la Santa Cruz de Queretaro, Fundadores de las Conversiones de la Purísima Concepcion, y de S. Pedro y S. Pablo del Rio Colorado entre los Gentiles Yumas, y muertos en ellas gloriosamente á manos de los mismos Bárbaros en los dias 17 y 19 de Julio de 1781 Dixo en la Iglesia de Dicho Colegio el 19 de Julio de 1794 en Que Se Sepultaron Sus Cenizas Fr. Diego Miguel Bringas de Manzaneda y Encinas, Misionero Apostólico, é Hijo del mismo Seminario.

Madrid, Año. En la Imprenta de D. Fermin Villalpando, Impresor de Camara de S.M. 1819

1067; 94 p., blank leaf. 20 cm.; This is much more than a funeral oration on Father Garcés and his fellow missionaries who were murdered on the Colorado. Mr. Wagner begins a long note on this in his Spanish Southwest (174a) by saying: "For many purposes this sermon may be considered as a continuation of the work of Fr. Juan Domingo Arricivita (his Cronica Serafica, Mexico, 1742), as the first part; to page 48 consists of historical notes about various Franciscan missionaries who labored in Sonora and Arizona at different times." Many of these missionaries served in Texas, as well as in Sonora and Arizona. They are listed in Mr. Wagner's note.; Sabin 44440. Wagner, Spanish Southwest, 174a.; Locations: C-S. NN. TxU. Graff. TWS.



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Bromme, Traugott.

Neuestes vollständigstes Hand- und Reisebuch für Auswanderer … Dritte ... auflage. … 1845.

See entry No. 1360B.
Bromme, Traugott.

Neuestes vollständigstes Hand-und Reisebuch für Auswanderer … Zweite ... auflage. … 1843.

See entry No. 1360A.
Bromme, Traugott, 1802-1866.

Neuestes vollständigstes Hand- und Reisebuch für Auswanderer aller Klassen und jeden Standes nach den Vereinigten Staaten von Nord-Amerika, Ober-und-Unter Canada, Neu-Braunschweig, Neu-Schottland und Texas.

Bayreuth. 1840

1360; ... Herausgeben von Traugott Bromme.; 8vo.; Though Sabin has many entries under Bromme, with differing titles, for his Guides to North America or to parts thereof, this Neuestes Handbuch is his only listing for 1845 or earlier with Texas in the title. A copy of the 1840 edition has not been available for examination but the short account of Texas in the 1843 edition, pages 287-295, is excellent. A brief sketch of its history thus far in the 19th century is followed by general information, including population figures for as late as 1841. Bromme's Gemalde von Nord-Amerika, Stuttgart, 1842, Sabin 8204 (copy in TWS), a massive production, shows the growth in interest in Texas since 1839 by devoting pages 757-800 in Volume II to a conventional guide to Texas. Several of Bromme's Guides published after 1845 include Texas.; Buck 357; Sabin 8210.; Streeter was unable to locate a copy of this for examination, but took his entry from Buck and Sabin. After the bibliography had been published Howell Heaney notified him that the Free Library of Philadelphia had acquired a copy of the 1840 edition, and that there was nothing about Texas or Canada either in the title or the book. Apparently this material was added in the 1843 edition. I have, however, let the entry stand.



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Bromme, Traugott, 1802-1866.

Neuestes vollständigstes Hand- und Reisebuch für Auswanderer aller Klassen und jeden Standes nach den Vereinigten Staaten von Nord-Amerika, Ober-und-Unter Canada, Neu-Braunschweig, Neu-Schottland und Texas.

Bayreuth: Verlag der Buchner'schen buchhandlung. 1843

1360A; "Zweite vermehrte und verbesserte auflage [of entry No. 1360]." Leaf of title, iv, ii, 358 p., map.; Though Sabin has many entries under Bromme, with differing titles, for his Guides to North America or to parts thereof, this Neuestes Handbuch is his only listing for 1845 or earlier with Texas in the title. A copy of the 1840 edition has not been available for examination but the short account of Texas in the 1843 edition, pages 287-295, is excellent. A brief sketch of its history thus far in the 19th century is followed by general information, including population figures for as late as 1841. Bromme's Gemalde von Nord-Amerika, Stuttgart, 1842, Sabin 8204 (copy in TWS), a massive production, shows the growth in interest in Texas since 1839 by devoting pages 757-800 in Volume II to a conventional guide to Texas. Several of Bromme's Guides published after 1845 include Texas.; Buck 357, note. Sabin 8210.; Locations: MBAt.



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Bromme, Traugott, 1802-1866.

Neuestes vollständigstes Hand- und Reisebuch für Auswanderer aller Klassen und jeden Standes nach den Vereinigten Staaten von Nord-Amerika, Ober-und-Unter Canada, Neu-Braunschweig, New-Schottland und Texas.

Bayreuth. 1845

1360B; "Dritte ... auflage." [of entry No. 1360], with same imprint, but dated 1845. viii, 381 p.; Though Sabin has many entries under Bromme, with differing titles, for his Guides to North America or to parts thereof, this Neuestes Handbuch is his only listing for 1845 or earlier with Texas in the title. A copy of the 1840 edition has not been available for examination but the short account of Texas in the 1843 edition, pages 287-295, is excellent. A brief sketch of its history thus far in the 19th century is followed by general information, including population figures for as late as 1841. Bromme's Gemalde von Nord-Amerika, Stuttgart, 1842, Sabin 8204 (copy in TWS), a massive production, shows the growth in interest in Texas since 1839 by devoting pages 757-800 in Volume II to a conventional guide to Texas. Several of Bromme's Guides published after 1845 include Texas.; Buck 357, note. Sabin 8210.; Locations: MB. NN.



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Brown, Aaron Venable, 1795-1859.

Texas and Oregon.

Washington: Printed by Blair & Rives. 1845

1567; Letter and Speeches of the Hon. A.V. Brown, of Tennessee, in reply to the Hon. John Quincy Adams, on the Annexation of Texas, and on the Bill for the Organization of a Territorial Government over Oregon.; 31 p. 23 cm.; John Quincy Adams had charged that a section of Andrew Jackson's letter of February 12, 1843, to Brown (text in Opinions of Gen. Andrew Jackson, on the Annexation of Texas, entry No. 1512) was "from beginning to end, grossly, glaringly, and willfully false." This referred to Jackson's statement that in negotiating the treaty of 1819 with Spain, Adams then being Secretary of State under Monroe, we had been given the option of making the Rio Grande rather than the Sabine, our boundary with the then Spanish province of Mexico. In publishing the letter Brown had evidently rubbed salt in the wound by adding a footnote saying that Jackson had meant to refer to the Colorado River instead of to the Rio Grande. This is not the place to discuss the controversy over the negotiation of the 1819 treaty beyond stating that Brown made, in Texas and Oregon, what seemed to be an effective reply. The pamphlet does illustrate the bitterness engendered by the annexation question. Pages 18 to the end give the debate in the House on January 27, 1845, on the Oregon Bill and Brown's remarks. Brown, later Governor of Tennessee and postmaster general in Buchanan's cabinet, is the subject of an article in the Dictionary of American Biography.; Locations: CtY. DLC. Tx (imperfect). TWS.



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Brown, John Henry, 1820-1895.

The Fall of the Alamo, Last Days of Crockett, with other sketches, of Texas.

[St. Louis, Missouri. Ustick & Davies]. [1843]

1448; Pamphlet.; No copy of this pamphlet is known, but in the John Henry Brown collection in the University of Texas Library Archives there are two items relating to it. One is in an unlabeled loose-leaf scrapbook with a marbled board cover containing an autobiography of Brown addressed to his children. On page 154 appears the following statement in Brown's own handwriting, "In December, 1843, I published in St Louis a pamphlet entitled The Fall of the Alamo, Last Days of Crockett with other sketches of Texas. It was a succinct account of the Texian revolution, and as you will see by various notices of it in this narrative, was highly complimented by all the papers of the city. But I regret that I have not a single copy of it left."; The other item is a leather bound scrapbook with a white label on the spine reading: "J.H.B. Newspaper Clippings 1831 ETC," and inside the front cover, which has become detached, is pasted the following clipping from the St. Louis (Mo.) Ariel, December, 1843: The Fall of Alamo, or the Last Days of Crockett.--A pamphlet with this title was this morning issued from the press, by Ustick & Davies. It is by John Henry Brown ... a gentleman who has resided many years in La Vaca, Texas, and writes from observation and correct information derived by enquiry on the spot.--It gives an account of Fannin's Massacre, as well as the battles of Concepcion, Goliad, San Antonio and in fact the whole history of the war.



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Brown, William John, 1805-1857.

To the People of the Fifth Congressional District of the State of Indiana.

[Washington?]. [1844]

1481; 8 p. 23 cm.; Caption title. Signed and dated at end: Wm. J. Brown. Washington City, April 24, 1844. This is a statement by a Democratic representative from Indiana, in favor of the re-annexation of Texas, "re-annexation," because Texas was included in the Louisiana Purchase. If we do not annex Texas "she must again fall into the hands of Mexico ... and the Protestant Missionaries of the Cross be driven from the land." The effect on slavery is minimized and dire results on this country's cotton trade are pictured if annexation fails and Texas comes under the influence of England.; Locations: NN. TxU.



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[Bryan, William, and others].

A Vindication of the Conduct of the Agency of Texas, in New-Orleans.

New-Orleans: Printed at the Louisiana Advertiser Office. 1836

1182; Respectfully Dedicated to the Free and Independent Citizens, of the Republic of Texas.; 19 p. 21 cm.; Austin and his fellow commissioners when in New Orleans on their way to Washington had in January, 1836, appointed Bryan as General Agent in New Orleans and Edward Hall as Purchasing Agent, for the Provisional Texas Government. They were superseded in May by the appointment of Thomas Toby and his brother as purchasing agents. In this pamphlet, signed at the end by Bryan and Hall and Samuel Ellis, Secretary of the General Agents, they give a good account of their stewardship and quote letters of praise from Austin and William H. Wharton, and also from Robert Triplett, who had been appointed as Bryan's successor as General Agent. This defense was answered by Thomas F. McKinney in a pamphlet entitled in part To All Who May Have Seen and Read the Dying Groans of Wm. Bryan, E. Hall and Saml. Ellis, Ex-Agents of Texas ..., Columbia, 1836 (entry No. 127). As stated in the note to entry No. 127, Dr. Barker called the change "all but disastrous" for Texas. There is an article on Bryan in the Handbook of Texas.; Raines, p. 202. Sabin 95132.; Locations: CtY. TxGR. TxU. TxWFM. TWS.



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Burleson, Edward, 1798-1851.

To the Public.

[Houston? Printed at the Telegraph Office?]. [1842]

505; [Address of General Burleson to his "Fellow-Citizens of Texas," dated April 6, 1842; followed by a letter from him to "Brigadier-General A. Somerville (i.e. Somervell)" and Somervell's reply, both dated San Antonio, March 31, 1842; and ending with Burleson's address disbanding the volunteers under his command, dated Alamo, San Antonio de Bexar, April 2, 1842.]; Broadside in three columns. 44.5 x 31 cm.; It appears from the Burleson letter of March 31 that on March 18 the volunteers then under his command at San Antonio had refused to obey the order of Houston giving the command of the troops there to Somervell. In this letter Burleson again offers to yield the command to Somervell, who, in his letter of the same date, declines "to subject [himself] to the mortification of their [the volunteers'] refusal to obey [his] orders." In his letter of April 2 disbanding the volunteers Burleson uses the well-known expression, "though Thermopylae had her messenger of defeat, the Alamo had none." The time and circumstances of the use of this expression by Burleson is discussed in a note in the Quarterly, Texas State Historical Association, for April, 1904, Vol. VII, p. 328. There a descendant of Burleson's says he used this expression for the first time in a speech to Texans assembled at Gonzales when the news of the fall of the Alamo reached that place. In his address here of April 6 to his "Fellow Citizens of Texas," Burleson tells how the Secretary of War at Austin (President Houston being absent in the east) had asked him to take command of the volunteers at San Antonio, and how shortly afterward he had received an order from the War Department "in no event to cross the Rio Grande." Burleson criticizes Houston's order not to advance and urges that the Texans should campaign in the Valley of the Rio Grande. Burleson came to Texas in 1830 and was prominent in Texas affairs, being a delegate to the convention of 1833, a colonel at Bexar and San Jacinto, in command of the troops in the Cherokee War, and vice president of Texas 1841-1844. I follow the sketch by Charles W. Ramsdell in the Dictionary of American Biography in giving 1798 as the year of Burleson's birth rather than 1793 as given in the Handbook of Texas. The addresses and letters are reprinted in the reconstructed Journals of the Sixth Congress, Vol. III, p. 43-47.; Locations: NcU (Southern Historical Collection).



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Burnet, David G.

See entry No. 421.


Burnet, David G.

Address … pronounced over the remains of the late Hon. John A. Wharton ... 1838.

See entry No. 303.
[Burnet, David Gouverneur, 1788-1870].

Opinion on the Four Hundred Leagues' Grant of Texas Land.

New-Orleans: Printed by William M'Kean and Co. 1836

1183; By One of the Oldest Settlers of Texas.; 12 p. 23 cm. Plain blue-gray wrappers. This is part of the literature on the notorious 400 league grant which Samuel M. Williams and two associates obtained from the state of Coahuila and Texas in May, 1835. The story of this grant and of its repercussions in Texas is told by Dr. Barker with his customary clarity in "Land Speculation as a Cause of the Texas Revolution," in the Texas Historical Association Quarterly, Volume X, July, 1906, at pages 76-95. Here Burnet takes the logical position that the state legislature could dispose of vacant lands only in accordance with powers conferred by the central government, which in this case were clearly exceeded. It appears from the text that all but the last two or three paragraphs of the Opinion were written late in 1835 and that the final paragraphs were written after Texas had declared its independence in 1836. The article was reprinted in the Telegraph and Texas Register for July 28, 1838. On the wrapper of my copy is written in ink, in an apparently contemporary hand: President Burnett's [sic] argument. Dr. Barker in his article quoted above says this was written by Burnet.; Sabin 95107.; Locations: MBAt. TxU. TWS.



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Burnet, David Gouverneur, 1788-1870.

Reply to the Report of the Committee on the Santa Fe Expedition.

[At end:] . [1842]

506; 7, [1] p. 22 cm.; Caption title.; This Reply is preceded by a letter "To the Editor of the Telegraph" in which Burnet states that a report charging him with "a violation of 'every obligation which is held sacred by man,' should not remain among the Archives of the Republic, without an effort to expose the error of its positions." The report which Burnet thus epitomizes was made on December 6, 1841, by a committee of the House headed by Isaac Van Zandt. It is entry No. 466. In his Reply Burnet points out that it was well known that he had nothing to do with the Santa Fe Expedition and that he disapproved of it. This Reply is reprinted from the pamphlet in the reconstructed Journals of the Sixth Congress, Vol. II, p. 176-182, accompanied by a statement of the editor of the Journals that though not part of the Journal, it is printed with the proceedings of the House for December 17, 1841, because of "the importance and rarity of the document." My copy of this Reply once belonged to Burnet and came to me from a member of his family. In his handwriting on the plain wrapper is, "Santa Fee [sic] Committee reply to--1842."; Locations: TxU. TxWFM. TWS.



Reel: 8
[Burnet, David Gouverneur, 1788-1870].

To Messrs. Anthony Dey, Wm. H. Sumner and George Curtis, Esquires.

[New York?]. [1830]

1116; [Text begins:] In compliance with your request to furnish a brief account of Texas, and more particularly of the Colonies of Messrs. Zavala, Vehlein and Burnet, I would remark, that ... [Letter, signed and dated on p. 4, "B. New-York, 15th November, 1830.", followed by two paragraphs on the ways of getting to Texas and the terms offered contractors who will undertake to procure settlers.]; 4-page folder printed on all 4 pages. 33 x 20 cm. This letter of Burnet seems to be the first descriptive account published in the United States of the Texas of the colonization period. It was issued to aid the promotion of the Galveston Bay and Texas Land Company, and was reprinted within a few weeks, with slight revisions, in the Address to the Reader of that company (entry No. 1123), where it is referréd to as "his revised account of Texas, which ... has been sought for and read with great avidity by the [prospective] emigrants." The two paragraphs at the end, mentioned in the entry, recommend entering Texas by way of Galveston, where agents of the company would be stationed about January 1, 1831, to assist intended settlers. They also state terms, not as far as I know printed elsewhere, of the premiums in land which will be given contractors by the Galveston Bay Company for introducing families, and emphasize that the colonization must be according to the laws of Mexico (italics in the original). Anthony Dey (1776-1859) and George Curtis (1799-1884) seem to have been well known lawyers in New York. Curtis was a graduate of Union College in the class of 1822. Sumner (1780-1861) was a graduate of Harvard in the class of 1799 and seems to have been prominent as a lawyer in Boston. It would be interesting if we could learn something about the functioning of the home office of a Texas land company such as this, what it realized from the sale of scrip, who was the leading factor in its affairs, and so on. A fortnight or so after the date of his letter, Burnet was married in New York. There are articles on him in the Dictionary of American Biography and in the Handbook of Texas.; Locations: TxU. TWS.



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Burnet, David Gouverneur, and Milam, Benjamin Rush.

See Western Colonization and Mining Company, entry No. 1114.


Burr, David H.

The State of Texas … 1845.

See entry No. 1134C.
Burr, David H.

Texas … 1834.

See entry No. 1134A.
Burr, David H.

Texas … 1835.

See entry No. 1134B.
Burr, David H., 1803-1875.

The State of 1836-1845 Texas, by David H. Burr.

Published by R.S. Fisher, New York. Engraved by S. Stiles & Co. N. York. [At foot, below neat line:] Entered ... by R.S. Fisher in the ... Southern District, of New York. 1845

1134C; Another edition [of entry No. 1134], from the same plate, with revisions, with same scale, prime meridians and insets. Though the title is now "The State of Texas," the map is only slightly changed from the 1835 issue (entry No. 1134B). The various grants are shown as before, a few counties are now shown, and three or four towns have been added.; Phillips, Maps, p. 842.; Locations: DLC. TxU.



Reel: 22
Burr, David H., 1803-1875.

Texas.


Published by J.H. Colton & Co No 9 Wall St. New-York. Engraved by S. Stiles & Co. N. York. [At foot, below neat line:] 1833 by J.H. Colton & Co. in the ... Southern District of New-York. 1833

1134; Map. 44 x 54 cm. Boundaries and empresario grants colored. Graphic scale: about 50 miles to the inch. Prime meridians: Greenwich and Washington. Insets: Distances; Plan of the Port of Galveston, Made by order of the Mexican Government, by Alexander Thompson, of the Mexican Navy, in 1828. Folded to height 13 cm. in leather covers lettered on front cover: Texas. The Burr map of 1833 is the first large scale map of Texas, as distinguished from a general map, to show all of Texas to the Arkansas River and so includes all the Texas Panhandle. The pioneer Austin map of 1830 goes only to a little north of the Red River. The Burr map, like the Austin map, is one of the landmarks of Texas cartography, showing as it does the parceling out of the country, with a few gaps, into seventeen land grants, all graphically shown in colors at the fairly large scale of fifty miles to an inch. The Austin map of 1830 gives only the boundaries of three grants, which it shows in color, and the Hooker maps of 1833 though they, like the Burr map, show Texas to the Arkansas River, do so on the small scale of about ninety miles to an inch and without color. This representation of land grants, often with legends giving their date and number of families to be settled, seems important enough to justify the listing of their names. They are as follows: Austin grants (3), Wilson and Exter, Padilla & Chambers, Dominguez, Cameron grants (2), Woodbury & Company, McMullen & McGloin, Powers, De Leon, De Witt, Galveston Bay Company's Burnet, Vehlein and Zavala, and Filisola. The Burr map incorporates for the first time on a printed map the Staples manuscript map of the Wilson and Exter grant, dividing it into twelve sections (see note to Arkansas and Texas Land Company, entry No. 1120), and follows that map in showing the Canadian River as intersecting the 23d meridian at about half a degree too far to the south. By 1833 it had been learned that the San Antonio flowed into the Guadalupe some miles above its mouth, and this is so represented in the Burr map and also in the Hooker map of 1833. For some, as far as I know, unexplained reason, the Burr map instead of following the Treaty of 1819, in drawing the boundary line north to the Red River from the Sabine River's intersection of the 32d parallel, incorrectly starts this line about twenty miles west of the intersection, thereby showing part of Texas as belonging to Arkansas and Louisiana. This led later to a boundary dispute between Arkansas and Texas as shown by the March 2, 1837, proclamation by the Governor of Arkansas (entry No. 1263). Not only the Burr map, but the Hooker and Mesier maps of 1833 and the Colorado and Red River Land Company map of 1835, followed later by other maps, make the same error. Burr had already established his reputation as a topographical engineer and maker of maps when in 1832 he became Topographer to the Post Office Department. He was later Geographer of the House of Representatives. His best known work is his rare American Atlas in thirteen sections issued in 1839 (Phillips 4525).; Locations: CtY.

Reel: 22
Burr, David H., 1803-1875.

Texas.


Published by J.H. Colton & Co No 9 Wall St. New-York. Engraved by S. Stiles & Co. N. York. [At foot, below neat line:] 1833 by J.H. Colton & Co. in the ... Southern District of New-York. 1835

1134B; Another edition [of entry No. 1134], with the date 1835 but from the same plate, with title, and imprint as in 1834 map, and same inscription of engravers, copyright, scale, prime meridians and insets. Folded to height 13 cm. in embossed cloth covers lettered in gilt on front cover: Burr's Map of the State of Coha & Texas Published by J.H. Colton & Co New York; The northern boundary still extends to the Arkansas and the unoccupied spaces are as in the 1834 issue. There are a few changes. The "Beals Grant," which in the 1834 issue bordered the Colorado River on the south, is now "Milam's Grant," and four towns not on the 1834 map are now located: Columbia on the Brazoria, and Augusta, Electa, and Mina on the Colorado. The last three do not appear on modern maps.; Locations: CtY. DLC. TxGR (fragments). TxU. TWS.


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