Texas as a Province and Republic 1795-1845 Author Index



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Texas as a Province and Republic 1795-1845

Author Index


An Account of the Birth, Parentage, Education and Early Pursuits of John McDaniel and Joseph Brown, parties in the murder of Chavis [sic], the Mexican, on "The Santa Fe Trace," together with their Adventures in Texas, being a true account as gathered from themselves, two days previous to their appointed execution, by permission of Mr. Birch, the United States Marshal.

St. Louis: Published by Higgins & Mead, Corner Second and Locust Sts. 1844

1467; By a Gentleman of St. Louis.; 19, [1] p. 21 cm.; The "Adventures in Texas" in the title which first led to the entry of this item are quite inconsequential and hardly worth recording, but this apparently hitherto unnoticed pamphlet is of some Texas interest because of its detailed account of the murder of Chaves in April, 1843. The American public had associated this murder, committed on American soil by McDaniel and Brown, with the sack of the New Mexican town of Mora, carried out a month later by a band headed by one Colonel Warfield. The latter held an authorization from the Texas government similar to that granted Jacob Snively in February, 1843, to intercept the Santa Fe caravan on Texas soil "in honorable warfare" and to keep half the loot. McDaniel claimed to be an officer in the Texan army and to be on the way to enroll under Warfield when the murder occurred. H. Bailey Carroll in his authoritative account of the Snively expedition, "Steward A. Miller and the Snively Expedition of 1843," in the Southwestern Historical Quarterly for January, 1951, Volume LIV, shows (p. 275-278) that the murder and the sack of Mora were unrelated and claims that the latter was, in 1843, in accord with the practices of civilized nations, a sort of "land privateering." Rufus Sage in his Scenes in the Rocky Mountains and ... Texas, Philadelphia, 1846 (Wagner-Camp 123), tells at pages 244-270 of his enlisting with Warfield in February, 1843, of the sack of Mora, of Warfield's joining the Snively expedition in June, 1843, and of his subsequent election as commander of one of the groups into which the Snively expedition broke up after it was disarmed by Colonel Cooke of the United States Dragoons on June 30, 1843. For more on the Snively expedition see the note to Tyler's Message of December 3, 1844 (entry No. 1552).; Rader 20.; Locations: DLC.

Reel: 33
Adams, Charles Francis, 1807-1886.

Texas and the Massachusetts Resolutions.

Boston. Eastburn's Press. 1844

1468; 54 p., blank leaf. 24 cm. Printed paper wrappers. Wrapper title same. This series of articles for the Boston Courier opposing annexation, by the son of John Quincy Adams, later American Minister to England at the time of our Civil War, discusses temperately the various arguments for and against annexation, especially those in Robert J. Walker's Letter of January, 1844. Adams states that though annexation would justify dissolution of the Union, the immediate policy of the Free States should be to continue their struggle against slavery. It appears from the text that this was published soon after the appointment of Calhoun as Secretary of State in March, 1844.; Rader 41. Raines, p. 2. Sabin 187.; Locations: CSmH. DLC. ICN. MH. NHi. Tx. TxDaM. TxGR. TxSa. TxU. TWS. Also other libraries.



Reel: 33
Adams, John Quincy, 1767-1848.

Address of John Quincy Adams, to His Constituents of the Twelfth Congressional District, at Braintree, September 17th, 1842.

Boston: J.H. Eastburn, Printer. 1842

1404; Reported originally for the Boston Atlas.; 63 p. 24 cm.; Text begins on verso of title.; The Boston edition of Adams's Braintree speech is preceded by an account of his reception by his constituents and is followed by the usual resolutions and an ode written by Rev. Mr. Pierpont. The 40-page edition, without imprint, only gives the speech. In this lengthy review of his congressional career, which sparkles with denunciations of Jackson, Van Buren, Tyler, and the South, Adams has much to say on Texas and again charges that the South is plotting the dismemberment of Mexico and the acquisition of an immense portion of her territories. Dr. Barker cites and quotes from this Address in support of his observation that abolitionist sentiment rather than opposition to territorial expansion was the chief obstacle to annexation ("The Annexation of Texas," Southwestern Historical Quarterly, July, 1946. Vol. L, p. 60-61). For a pamphlet published the same year giving extracts from the Address, see entry No. 1405.; Sabin 270.; Locations: DLC. ICN. ICU. MH. NjP. NN. Tx. TxDaM. TxU.



Reel: 31
Adams, John Quincy, 1767-1848.

Address of John Quincy Adams, to his Constituents of the Twelfth Congressional District. Delivered at Braintree, September 17, 1842.

[n.p.]. [1842]

1404A; Another edition [of entry No. 1404]. [40 p. 25 cm. Stitched. Caption title. The Boston edition of Adams's Braintree speech is preceded by an account of his reception by his constituents and is followed by the usual resolutions and an ode written by Rev. Mr. Pierpont. The 40-page edition, without imprint, only gives the speech. In this lengthy review of his congressional career, which sparkles with denunciations of Jackson, Van Buren, Tyler, and the South, Adams has much to say on Texas and again charges that the South is plotting the dismemberment of Mexico and the acquisition of an immense portion of her territories. Dr. Barker cites and quotes from this Address in support of his observation that abolitionist sentiment rather than opposition to territorial expansion was the chief obstacle to annexation ("The Annexation of Texas," Southwestern Historical Quarterly, July, 1946. Vol. L, p. 60-61). For a pamphlet published the same year giving extracts from the Address, see entry No. 1405.; Locations: MH. NN. TxU. TWS.



Reel: 31
Adams, John Quincy, 1767-1848.

Discurso del ex-presidente de los Estados Unidos, Mr. John Quincy Adams, en la Cámara de Representantes de Washington, Miércoles, Mayo 25 de 1836.

Méjico. 1836

847; 22 p. 18 cm.; In the following year Adams referred to this speech, in which he opposed the annexation of Texas, as "by far the most noted speech that I ever made." It was printed in part as item "A" in the appendix of the London, 1837, edition of Miss Martineau's Society in America, and in other editions of the work.; Locations: C-S. CU-B. CtY. BNM.



Reel: 14
Adams, John Quincy, 1767-1848.

Speech of John Quincy Adams, of Massachusetts, upon the Right of the People, Men and Women, to Petition; on the Freedom of Speech and of Debate in the House of Representatives of the United States; on the Resolutions of Seven State Legislatures, and the petitions of more than one hundred thousand petitioners, relating to the Annexation of Texas to This Union.

Washington: Printed by Gales and Seaton. 1838

1305; Delivered in the House of Representatives of the United States, in fragments of the morning hour, from the 16th of June to the 7th of July, 1838, inclusive.; 131 p. 25 cm.; This speech against annexation, delivered from day to day by John Quincy Adams, was followed by defeat in the House of a resolution in favor of "reannexing Texas," whenever that could be done "consistently with the public faith and treaty stipulations of the United States." For defeat of a similar resolution in the Senate in June, 1838, see note to entry No. 1329.; Sabin 307.; Locations: CSmH. CU. CtY. DLC. MB. MH. NHi. NN. Tx. TxDaM. TxSa. TxU. TxWB. TWS. Also other libraries.



Reel: 27
Adams, John Quincy, 1767-1848.

Texas.


Washington. 1842

1405; Extracts from the Address of John Quincy Adams, ex-President of the United States of America, to His Constituents of the Twelfth Congressional District of Massachusetts, at Braintree, September 17, 1842. Translated into French and Spanish from the National Intelligencer of October 22, 1842.; 32 p.; 22 cm.; Text in English, p. [3]-12; in French, p. 13-22; and in Spanish, p. 23-32. For note on the Address, see entry No. 1404.; Rader 46. Sabin 311.; Locations: DLC. MoSM. TWS.



Reel: 31
Adams, John, pseudonym.

See entry No. 552.


Adams, John, pseudonym.

See [Baker, Moseley], entry No. 1447.


Adams, Joseph Thornton, 1796-1878.

Lecture, on the Subject of Re-Annexing Texas.

Published in the New-Bedford Register. 1845

1561; To the United States. Delivered in New-Bedford. Feb. 10, 1845. By Joseph T. Adams, of New Bedford.; 14 p., blank leaf, text printed in double columns. 23 cm. Stitched.; This lecture, delivered while the annexation resolution of the House was being debated in the Senate, and with various Massachusetts groups still in bitter opposition, is a temperate argument in its favor. Adams makes the usual points and refers to talks of his on Texas published in the Boston Centinel and Gazette in 1836. Adams, a graduate of Harvard in the Class of 1820, was part owner and editor of the Centinel and Gazette in the years 1828-1840. His appointment as Collector of the Port at New Bedford by President Tyler on June 11, 1844, was perhaps in recognition of his stand on annexation.; Locations: TxFw. TxGR. TxU. TWS.



Reel: 35
Adams, Joseph Thornton, 1796-1878.

Lecture, on the Subject of Re-Annexing Texas.

Published in the New-Bedford Register. 1845

1561A; Another edition [of entry No. 1561] with same title and imprint, but with minor changes in the punctuation of both, and with the text in single columns.; 24 p. 24 cm.; This lecture, delivered while the annexation resolution of the House was being debated in the Senate, and with various Massachusetts groups still in bitter opposition, is a temperate argument in its favor. Adams makes the usual points and refers to talks of his on Texas published in the Boston Centinel and Gazette in 1836. Adams, a graduate of Harvard in the Class of 1820, was part owner and editor of the Centinel and Gazette in the years 1828-1840. His appointment as Collector of the Port at New Bedford by President Tyler on June 11, 1844, was perhaps in recognition of his stand on annexation.; Rader 47. Raines, p. 3.; Locations: CtY. DLC. MB. NN. Tx. TxGR. TxWB. TWS.



Reel: 35
Adamson, John.

An Account of Texas; with Instructions for Emigrants.

London: Printed by J. Eames, 7, Tavistock Street, Covent Garden. 1839

1340; [At end:] J. Eames, Printer … ; 12 p. 18 cm. Printed paper wrappers. Wrapper title. This Account was probably written to promote emigration to Texas on the ship advertised by a broadside of John Adamson & Co. to sail for Texas on September 30, 1839 (see entry No. 1342). Though Adamson paints a glowing picture of the advantages of Texas for British emigrants, saying for example that "an industrious man after a few years residence, will be worth many thousands of dollars," his account does give much information about the country, its products, and what the emigrants should bring with them on the ship. One of his observations is that "Young females of respectability and character would marry most eligibly in that country. I had a number of commissions from gentlemen of fortune to bring out, if I could persuade them, ladies of good moral character, either English or Scotch." In a section on pages 7-12 entitled "Hints to Emigrants," Adamson says he arrived at Matagorda, which is especially mentioned, on the 24th of November, probably in 1838.; Locations: TWS.



Reel: 28
[Adamson, John, & Company?].

Dietary for Steerage Passengers for Texas, for Each Day in the Week.

[At end:] J. Eames, Printer, 7, Tavistock Street, Covent Garden. [London]. [1839?]

1341; [Table showing 19 articles of food and drink rationed off in varying amounts for each day, followed by three lines of text:] Other Articles may be substituted for the above in Fair and Equal Proportions … ; Broadside. 20 x 32 cm.; This Dietary undoubtedly applied to the ship advertised as sailing for Texas "the 30th Inst.," advertisement for which is given in entry No. 1342. At the end are the statements, "Women receive the same rations as Men. Children to receive rations in proportion to the charges made for their Passage. In case of Illness, Barley is to be served out; and when the Potatoes are expended, one pound of Rice may be substituted for three pounds of Potatoes."; Locations: NN. TWS.



Reel: 28
Adamson, John, & Company.

Emigration to Texas.

Printed by J. Eames, at the "Crown Press," 7, Tavistock Street, Covent Garden. [London]. [1839]

1342; For the Gulph of Mexico. [Circular to promote emigration to Texas and sale of lands. Text begins:] A Chartered Ship to Sail on, or before, the 30th Inst. The British Barque George ... is now lying in the St. Catharine's Docks. Texas is a rich, fertile, prosperous and independent Republic ... [Signed:] Adamson & Company. [This is followed by rates of passage and continues:] For full particulars ... apply at the Texian Land and Commercial Office, 28, Southampton Street, Strand … ; Broadside. 23 x 19 cm.; This is the broadside referred to in entry Nos. 1340 and 1341. In this, changes in pen and ink indicate that the ship was the Penelope and would sail October 7. Though not dated, it refers to the grants to emigrants who arrived on or before January 1, 1840, and so was presumably published in September, 1839. Rates for First Cabin were £30, Intermediate £20, Steerage £10; Children at half price in all three classifications. From the note to the entry for Dietary, it would appear that children would be allowed just half the rations of adults. People were strongly advised against going to Texas by way of New Orleans as the rates from New Orleans to Texas were at least £5 a passenger, plus charges for luggage. The sequel to this broadside is given in a three-page letter bound in with it, dated Galveston, 20th April, 1840, and signed J. Lewis, saying in part, "In answer to your inquiries I beg to state that it was in August last I called on Dr. Adamson respecting Texas and obtained from him the accompanying prospectus and pamphlet--he represented himself as the Agent to the Texian Land Company ... I was induced to embark, and on or about the 7th of October paid him £10 on account of my passage he representing that the Penelope a ship he had chartered would positively sail immediately." The letter goes on to say that the Penelope was condemned and finally burned. How Lewis got to Texas is not disclosed. A postscript dated April 21st says, "I have just heard from good authority that Dr. Adamson never had any land in Texas, that he came from New York in very embarrassed circumstances and left Matagorda for England after remaining there but a very short time."; Locations: NN. TWS.



Reel: 28
An Address to Emigrants. Texas [1835].

See [Galveston Bay and Texas Land Company], entry No. 1163.


Adoned vas, Soldado! [Ornamental rule] Imitacion.

Mexico: Imprenta de Vicente G. Torres, calle del Espiritu Santo num. 2. 1844

997.6; Broadside 31 x 21 cm.; A sort of patriotic catechism in which the soldier gives a number of reasons for going to war against Texas. The Yale copy is slightly mutilated, affecting a few words of text.; Locations: CtY.

Reel: 15
Advocate of the People's Rights, Brazoria.

Extra. Brazoria, Wednesday, March 27, 1834.

[Brazoria: Printed at the Office of the Advocate of the People's Rights]. [1834]

42; [Published "for the sole purpose of laying before the public" a letter from Stephen F. Austin to the Ayuntamiento of San Felipe de Austin dated "Monterry [sic], Jan. 17, 1834.", but including a number of other items. Text begins:] The present Extra closes the career of the "Advocate," until the return of Oliver H. Allen, the Editor, who is now absent in the U.S. of the North ...; Broadsheet, both sides in three columns. 45.5 x 30 cm.; This is one of the letters written by Austin after his arrest at Saltillo on January 3, 1834, when on his way back to Texas from his mission to Mexico City. The letter is dated from Monterrey, where for some reason he was taken before being returned to Mexico City, and is printed in full in the Austin Papers, Vol. II, p. 1039-1041. Austin asks that there be no excitement about his arrest and says that the general government is disposed, within the limits of its constitutional powers, to act for the good of Texas. Following Austin's letter is a translation of the letter from the Minister of Foreign Relations to Austin, dated Mexico, December 7, 1833. The Spanish text of the December 7 letter is in the Austin Papers, Vol. II, p. 1017. Nothing seems to be known about Oliver H. Allen, except that he was the editor of the Advocate.; Locations: TxU.



Reel: 1
Alcerreca, Agustin.

Manifiesto que Publica el Coronel Graduado y Primer Ayudante Agustin Alcerreca, para Justificarse ante el Supremo Gobierno de la Nacion y ante sus conciudadanos, de la nota con que ha pretendido mancharse su conducta en un folleto Que Se Imprimio en Matamoros, cuyo autor no se descubre y refiere hechos de la pasada campaña de Tejas.

San Luis Potosi: Imprenta del Gobierno, á cargo del Ciudadano José Maria Infante. 1836

848; Leaf of title, 15 p., verso blank, blank leaf. 20.2 cm.; This is an attempt by Alcerreca, often referred to as Alcérrica, at an explanation of Filisola's statement in his letter of May 14, 1836, to the Secretary of War, No. 2 of the documents of his Representacion, Mexico, 1836, (entry No. 853), at page 55, that Alcerreca had precipitately abandoned Matagorda, leaving undefended there part of his force. Alcerreca had been left in command at Matagorda by Urrea, who had entered Matagorda on his march north in April, 1836. In that march Alcerreca had had charge of the execution of Fannin and his men at Goliad and one of his fears was that if he were captured by the Texans they would in turn execute him and his men. When on April 28 a letter came in from his immediate superior reporting the death of Santa Anna and several of his staff at San Jacinto, reprinted at pages 14-15 of this pamphlet, Alcerreca had apparently become panic stricken. In Urrea's Diario of 1838, entry No. 940, documents Nos. 39 and 40 at pages 102-104 refer to Alcerreca at Matagorda.; Locations: CtY. TxU. BNM.



Reel: 14
Allen, [Ebenezer? d. 1863].

... Jesse Carr, by David A. Monaghan His Guardian---Appellant. vs. William Wellborn---Appellee. Allen, for Appellant. Brief.

[Washington: Printed at the National Vindicator Office]. [1844]

580; 15 p. 20 cm.; Caption title, with heading: Republic of Texas. Supreme Court-Summer Term, 1844, at Washington. Appeal from the District Court for Red River County. Ebenezer Allen seems to be the only Allen of this period in Texas who was well known as a lawyer and he is almost certainly the author of this brief and of the one which follows. A sketch of him in the Writings of Sam Houston, Vol. IV, p. 389, says that he arrived in Texas in the early days of the republic. He was an able and successful lawyer, who served as attorney general under Anson Jones and performed also the duties of secretary of state. This brief is on the interesting point of law as to the extent to which suits may be brought in Texas on judgments from foreign jurisdictions.; Locations: TWS.



Reel: 9
Allen, [Ebenezer? d. 1863].

... Wesley Byers, Appellant, vs. Massack H. Janes & Als. Allen, for Appellant. Brief.

[Washington? Printed at the National Vindicator Office?]. [1844]

581; 9 p. 19.6 cm.; Caption title, with heading: Republic of Texas, Supreme Court, Summer Term, 1844, at Washington; Appeal from the District Court for Bowie County. The issue in this proceeding was the title to land in Bowie County on the Red River, which had been settled by Wesley Byers previous to 1830, in what had been Wavel's colony. In the early days of the republic this land was in Red River County, but owing to the dispute as to the boundary between the United States and Texas, Byers had been prevented from locating land under his certificate. This brief is of historical importance on account of its contemporary discussion and historical résumé of the boundary question and of the operations of the Texas land office in this part of the republic. For Allen, see note to entry No. 580.; Locations: TWS.



Reel: 9
Allen, Augustus Chapman, 1806-1864.

The town of Houston.

[Columbia? Printed at the Telegraph Office?]. [1836]

112.1; [Text begins:] Situated at the head of Navigation, on the west bank of Buffalo Bayou, is now for the first time brought to public notice … [Signed at end:] A.C. Allen, J.K. Allen; Broadside 23 x 14 cm.; Dated at end: August 30, 1836. Augustus Allen and his brother John moved to Texas in 1832, settling first at San Augustine, then at Nacogdoches. In 1836 they bought from John Austin his half league of land on Buffalo Bayou and determined to build a town there and name it for Sam Houston. By offering to build a capitol at their own expense and provide other accomodations they persuaded the government to move to their new town, and in May of 1837 Houston became the capital of Texas. There are articles on both Augustus and John Allen in the Handbook of Texas.; Locations: Entered from a copy privately owned.



Reel: 1
[Allen, George, 1792-1883].

An Appeal to the People of Massachusetts, on the Texas Question.

Boston: Charles C. Little and James Brown. [On verso of title:] Cambridge: Metcalf and Company, Printers to the University. 1844

1469; 20 p. 23 cm. Printed paper wrappers. Wrapper title same, but without imprint. Signed at end: a Massachusetts Freeman.; This was written after Polk, who had unreservedly supported annexation, had been victor over Clay in the presidential election of 1844 and after Tyler's message at the opening of the 28th Congress, saying that as the American people had voted decisively for annexation, this should now be carried out by a joint resolution. Allen points out that in the Free States, except in Massachusetts and Vermont, the Whigs were deterred from arguing the Texas question "upon its broad merits" for fear of losing votes in the South and that if Whig speakers had, as in Massachusetts, taken the ground of "Texas and Slavery, one and inseparable" the result would have been different. He goes on to call for a convention. "Massachusetts Is Ready. It only remains for Faneuil Hall to give the watchword, A Convention--To The Rescue!" For a brief sketch of Allen see note to his Complaint of Mexico, Boston, 1843, entry No. 1446. Sabin attributes this to Allen on the authority of Dexter's Yale Graduates (Vol. 6, p. 515).; Sabin 95070.; Locations: CU-B. CtY. ICN. MB. MH. NHi. NN. Tx. TxDaM. TxFw. TxGR. TxSa. TxU. TWS. Also other libraries.



Reel: 33
[Allen, George, 1792-1883].

An Appeal to the People of Massachusetts, on the Texas Question.

Boston: Charles C. Little and James Brown. [On verso of title:] Cambridge: Metcalf and Company, Printers to the University. 1844

1469A; Another issue [of entry No. 1469] with same title, imprint, collation, and wrappers, but with the following note added on p. 20: Second Edition. Since the publication of the first edition, the information has been received, that the President has transmitted a Special Message to Congress, urging immediate action upon his recommendation to annex Texas by a joint resolution. If any thing is to be done, therefore, by Massachusetts, and the other Free States, Not A Moment should be Lost. This was written after Polk, who had unreservedly supported annexation, had been victor over Clay in the presidential election of 1844 and after Tyler's message at the opening of the 28th Congress, saying that as the American people had voted decisively for annexation, this should now be carried out by a joint resolution. Allen points out that in the Free States, except in Massachusetts and Vermont, the Whigs were deterred from arguing the Texas question "upon its broad merits" for fear of losing votes in the South and that if Whig speakers had, as in Massachusetts, taken the ground of "Texas and Slavery, one and inseparable" the result would have been different. He goes on to call for a convention. "Massachusetts Is Ready. It only remains for Faneuil Hall to give the watchword, A Convention--To The Rescue!" For a brief sketch of Allen see note to his Complaint of Mexico, Boston, 1843, entry No. 1446. Sabin attributes this to Allen on the authority of Dexter's Yale Graduates (Vol. 6, p. 515).; Rader 102. Sabin 95070.; Locations: CtY. DLC. ICN. MB. MH. NHi. NN. Tx. TxU. TxWB. TWS. Also other libraries.


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