Terrestrial animal Health Standards Commission Report



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Participation in OIE activities

Questions on a country's adherence to its obligations as a member of the OIE are relevant to an evaluation of the Veterinary Services of the country. Self-acknowledged inability or repeated failure of a Member to fulfil reporting obligations to the OIE will detract from the overall outcome of the evaluation. Such countries, as well as non-member countries, will need to provide extensive information regarding their Veterinary Services and sanitary/zoosanitary status for evaluation purposes.

Article 3.2.12.

Evaluation of veterinary statutory body

1. Scope

In the evaluation of the veterinary statutory body, the following items may be considered, depending on the purpose of the evaluation:

a. objectives and functions;

b. legislative basis, autonomy and functional capacity;

c. the composition and representation of the body's membership;

d. accountability and transparency of decision-making;

e. sources and management of funding;

f. administration of training programmes and continuing professional development for veterinarians and veterinary para-professionals.

2. Evaluation of objectives and functions

The veterinary statutory body should define its policy and objectives, including detailed descriptions of its powers and functions such as:

a. to regulate veterinarians and veterinary para-professionals through licensing and/or registration of such persons;

b. to determine the minimum standards of education (initial and continuing) required for degrees, diplomas and certificates entitling the holders thereof to be registered as veterinarians and veterinary para-professionals;

c. to determine the standards of professional conduct of veterinarians and veterinary para-professionals and to ensure these standards are met.

3. Evaluation of legislative basis, autonomy and functional capacity

The veterinary statutory body should be able to demonstrate that it has the capacity, supported by appropriate legislation, to exercise and enforce control over all veterinarians and veterinary para-professionals. These controls should include, where appropriate, compulsory licensing and registration, minimum standards of education (initial and continuing) for the recognition of degrees, diplomas and certificates, setting standards of professional conduct and exercising control and the application of disciplinary procedures.

The veterinary statutory body should be able to demonstrate autonomy from undue political and commercial interests.

Where applicable, regional agreements for the recognition of degrees, diplomas and certificates for veterinarians and veterinary para-professionals should be demonstrated.

4. Evaluation of membership representation

Detailed descriptions should be available in respect of the membership of the veterinary statutory body and the method and duration of appointment of members. Such information includes:

a. veterinarians designated by the Veterinary Authority, such as the Chief Veterinary Officer;

b. veterinarians elected by members registered by the veterinary statutory body;

c. veterinarians designated or nominated by the veterinary association(s);

d. representative(s) of veterinary para-professions;

e. representative(s) of veterinary academia;

f. representative(s) of other stakeholders from the private sector;

g. election procedures and duration of appointment;

h. qualification requirements for members.

5. Evaluation of accountability and transparency of decision-making

Detailed information should be available on disciplinary procedures regarding the conducting of enquiries into professional misconduct, transparency of decision-making, publication of findings, sentences and mechanisms for appeal.

Additional information regarding the publication at regular intervals of activity reports, lists of registered or licensed persons including deletions and additions should also be taken into consideration.

6. Evaluation of financial sources and financial management

Information regarding income and expenditure, including fee structure(s) for the licensing/registration of persons should be available.

7. Evaluation of training programmes and programmes for continuing professional development, for veterinarians and veterinary para-professionals

Descriptive summary of continuing professional development, training and education programmes should be provided, including descriptions of content, duration and participants; documented details of quality manuals and standards relating to Good Veterinary Practice should be provided.

Article 3.2.13.

1. The Veterinary Services of a country may undertake self-evaluation against the above criteria for such purposes as national interest, improvement of internal efficiency or export trade facilitation. The way in which the results of self-evaluation are used or distributed is a matter for the country concerned.

2. A prospective importing country may undertake an evaluation of the Veterinary Services of an exporting country as part of a risk analysis process, which is necessary to determine the sanitary or zoosanitary measures which the country will use to protect human or animal life or health from disease or pest threats posed by imports. Periodic evaluation reviews are also valid following the commencement of trade.

3. In the case of evaluation for the purposes of international trade, the authorities of an importing country should use the principles elaborated above as the basis for the evaluation and should attempt to acquire information according to the model questionnaire outlined in Article 3.2.14. The Veterinary Services of the importing country are responsible for the analysis of details and for determining the outcome of the evaluation after taking into account all the relevant information. The relative ranking of importance ascribed, in the evaluation, to the criteria described in this chapter will necessarily vary according to case-by-case circumstances. This ranking should be established in an objective and justifiable way. Analysis of the information obtained in the course of an evaluation study must be performed in as objective a manner as possible. The validity of the information should be established and reasonableness should be employed in its application. The assessing country must be willing to defend any position taken on the basis of this type of information, if challenged by the other party.

Article 3.2.14.

This article outlines appropriate information requirements for the self-evaluation or evaluation of the Veterinary Services of a country.

1. Organisation and structure of Veterinary Services

a. National Veterinary Authority

Organisational chart including numbers, positions and numbers of vacancies.

b. Sub-national components of the Veterinary Authority

Organisational charts including numbers, positions and number of vacancies.

c. Other providers of veterinary services

Description of any linkage with other providers of veterinary services.

2. National information on human resources

a. Veterinarians

i. Total numbers of veterinarians registered/licensed by the Veterinary statutory body of the country.

ii. Numbers of:

§ full time government veterinarians: national and sub-national;

§ part time government veterinarians: national and sub-national;

§ private veterinarians authorised by the Veterinary Services to perform official veterinary functions [Describe accreditation standards, responsibilities and/or limitations applying to these private veterinarians.];

§ other veterinarians.

iii. Animal health:

Numbers associated with farm livestock sector on a majority time basis in a veterinary capacity, by geographical area [Show categories and numbers to differentiate staff involved in field service, laboratory, administration, import/export and other functions, as applicable.]:

§ full time government veterinarians: national and sub-national;

§ part time government veterinarians: national and sub-national;

§ other veterinarians.

iv. Veterinary public health:

Numbers employed in food inspection on a majority time basis, by commodity [Show categories and numbers to differentiate staff involved in inspection, laboratory and other functions, as applicable.]:

§ full time government veterinarians: national and sub-national;

§ part time government veterinarians: national and sub-national;

§ other veterinarians.

v. Numbers of veterinarians relative to certain national indices:

§ per total human population;

§ per farm livestock population, by geographical area;

§ per livestock farming unit, by geographical area.

vi. Veterinary education:

§ number of veterinary schools;

§ length of veterinary course (years);

§ international recognition of veterinary degree.

vii. Veterinary professional associations.

b. Graduate personnel (non-veterinary)

Details to be provided by category (including biologists, biometricians, economists, engineers, lawyers, other science graduates and others) on numbers within the Veterinary Authority and available to the Veterinary Authority.

c. Veterinary para-professionals employed by the Veterinary Services

i. Animal health:

§ Categories and numbers involved with farm livestock on a majority time basis:

§ by geographical area;

§ proportional to numbers of field Veterinary Officers in the Veterinary Services, by geographical area.

§ Education/training details.

ii. Veterinary public health:

§ Categories and numbers involved in food inspection on a majority time basis:

§ meat inspection: export meat establishments with an export function and domestic meat establishments (no export function);

§ dairy inspection;

§ other foods.

§ Numbers in import/export inspection.

§ Education/training details.

d. Support personnel

Numbers directly available to Veterinary Services per sector (administration, communication, transport).

e. Descriptive summary of the functions of the various categories of staff mentioned above

f. Veterinary, veterinary para-professionals, livestock owner, farmer and other relevant associations

g. Additional information and/or comments.

3. Financial management information

a. Total budgetary allocations to the Veterinary Authority for the current and past two fiscal years:

i. for the national Veterinary Authority;

ii. for each of any sub-national components of the Veterinary Authority;

iii. for other relevant government-funded institutions.

b. Sources of the budgetary allocations and amount:

i. government budget;

ii. sub-national authorities;

iii. taxes and fines;

iv. grants;

v. private services.

c. Proportional allocations of the amounts in a) above for operational activities and for the programme components of Veterinary Services.

d. Total allocation proportionate of national public sector budget. [This data may be necessary for comparative assessment with other countries which should take into account the contexts of the importance of the livestock sector to the national economy and of the animal health status of the country.]

e. Actual and proportional contribution of animal production to gross domestic product.

4. Administration details

a. Accommodation

Summary of the numbers and distribution of official administrative centres of the Veterinary Services (national and sub-national) in the country.

b. Communications

Summary of the forms of communication systems available to the Veterinary Services on a nation-wide and local area bases.

c. Transport

i. Itemised numbers of types of functional transport available on a full-time basis for the Veterinary Services. In addition provide details of transport means available part-time.

ii. Details of annual funds available for maintenance and replacement of motor vehicles.

5. Laboratory services

a. Diagnostic laboratories (laboratories engaged primarily in diagnosis)

i. Descriptive summary of the organisational structure and role of the government veterinary laboratory service in particular its relevance to the field Veterinary Services.

ii. Numbers of veterinary diagnostic laboratories operating in the country:

§ government operated laboratories;

§ private laboratories accredited by government for the purposes of supporting official or officially-endorsed animal health control or public health testing and monitoring programmes and import/export testing.

iii. Descriptive summary of accreditation procedures and standards for private laboratories.

iv. Human and financial resources allocated to the government veterinary laboratories, including staff numbers, graduate and post-graduate qualifications and opportunities for further training.

v. List of diagnostic methodologies available against major diseases of farm livestock (including poultry).

vi. Details of collaboration with external laboratories including international reference laboratories and details on numbers of samples submitted.

vii. Details of quality control and assessment (or validation) programmes operating within the veterinary laboratory service.

viii. Recent published reports of the official veterinary laboratory service which should include details of specimens received and foreign animal disease investigations made.

ix. Details of procedures for storage and retrieval of information on specimen submission and results.

x. Reports of independent reviews of the laboratory service conducted by government or private organisations (if available).

xi. Strategic and operational plans for the official veterinary laboratory service (if available).

b. Research laboratories (laboratories engaged primarily in research)

i. Numbers of veterinary research laboratories operating in the country:

§ government operated laboratories;

§ private laboratories involved in full time research directly related to animal health and veterinary public health matters involving production animal species.

ii. Summary of human and financial resources allocated by government to veterinary research.

iii. Published programmes of future government sponsored veterinary research.

iv. Annual reports of the government research laboratories.

6. Veterinary legislation and fFunctional capabilities and legislative support

a. Animal health and veterinary public health

i. Assessment of the adequacy and implementation of relevant legislation (national or sub-national) concerning the following:

§ animal and veterinary public health controls at national frontiers;

§ control of endemic animal diseases, including zoonoses;

§ emergency powers for control of exotic disease outbreaks, including zoonoses;

§ inspection and registration of facilities;

§ veterinary public health controls of the production, processing, storage and marketing of meat for domestic consumption;

§ veterinary public health controls of the production, processing, storage and marketing of fish, dairy products and other foods of animal origin for domestic consumption;

§ registration and use of veterinary pharmaceutical products including vaccines.

ii. Assessment of ability of Veterinary Services to enforce legislation.

b. Export/import inspection

i. Assessment of the adequacy and implementation of relevant national legislation concerning:

§ veterinary public health controls of the production, processing, storage and transportation of meat for export;

§ veterinary public health controls of production, processing, storage and marketing of fish, dairy products and other foods of animal origin for export;

§ animal health and veterinary public health controls of the export and import of animals, animal genetic material, animal products, animal feedstuffs and other products subject to veterinary inspection;

§ animal health controls of the importation, use and bio-containment of organisms which are aetiological agents of animal diseases, and of pathological material;

§ animal health controls of importation of veterinary biological products including vaccines;

§ administrative powers available to Veterinary Services for inspection and registration of facilities for veterinary control purposes (if not included under other legislation mentioned above);

§ documentation and compliance.

ii. Assessment of ability of Veterinary Services to enforce legislation.

7. Animal health and veterinary public health controls

a. Animal health

i. Description of and sample reference data from any national animal disease reporting system controlled and operated or coordinated by the Veterinary Services.

ii. Description of and sample reference data from other national animal disease reporting systems controlled and operated by other organisations which make data and results available to Veterinary Services.

iii. Description and relevant data of current official control programmes including:

§ epidemiological surveillance or monitoring programmes;

§ officially approved industry administered control or eradication programmes for specific diseases.

iv. Description and relevant details of animal disease emergency preparedness and response plans.

v. Recent history of animal disease status:

§ animal diseases eradicated nationally or from defined sub-national zones in the last ten years;

§ animal diseases of which the prevalence has been controlled to a low level in the last ten years;

§ animal diseases introduced to the country or to previously free sub national regions in the last ten years;

§ emerging diseases in the last ten years;

§ animal diseases of which the prevalence has increased in the last ten years.

b. Veterinary public health

i. Food hygiene

§ Annual national slaughter statistics for the past three years according to official data by species of animals (bovine, ovine, porcine, caprine, poultry, farmed game, wild game, equine, other).

§ Estimate of total annual slaughterings which occur but are not recorded under official statistics.

§ Proportion of total national slaughter which occurs in registered export establishments, by category of animal.

§ Proportion of total national slaughter which occurs under veterinary control, by category of animal.

§ Numbers of commercial fresh meat establishments in the country which are registered for export by the Veterinary Authority:

§ slaughterhouses (indicate species of animals);

§ cutting/packing plants (indicate meat type);

§ meat processing establishments (indicate meat type);

§ cold stores.

§ Numbers of commercial fresh meat establishments in the country approved by other importing countries which operate international assessment inspection programmes associated with approval procedures.

§ Numbers of commercial fresh meat establishments under direct public health control of the Veterinary Services (including details of category and numbers of inspection staff associated with these premises).

§ Description of the veterinary public health programme related to production and processing of animal products for human consumption (including fresh meat, poultry meat, meat products, game meat, dairy products, fish, fishery products, molluscs and crustaceans and other foods of animal origin) especially including details applying to exports of these commodities.

§ Descriptive summary of the roles and relationships of other official organisations in public health programmes for the products listed above if the Veterinary Authority does not have responsibility for those programmes which apply to national production destined to domestic consumption and/or exports of the commodities concerned.

ii. Zoonoses

§ Descriptive summary of the numbers and functions of staff of the Veterinary Authority involved primarily with monitoring and control of zoonotic diseases.

§ Descriptive summary of the role and relationships of other official organisations involved in monitoring and control of zoonoses to be provided if the Veterinary Authority does not have these responsibilities.

iii. Chemical residue testing programmes

§ Descriptive summary of national surveillance and monitoring programmes for environmental and chemical residues and contaminants applied to animal-derived foodstuffs, animals and animal feedstuffs.

§ Role and function in these programmes of the Veterinary Authority and other Veterinary Services to be described in summary form.

§ Descriptive summary of the analytical methodologies used and their consistency with internationally recognised standards.

iv. Veterinary medicines

§ Descriptive summary of the administrative and technical controls involving registration, supply and use of veterinary pharmaceutical products especially including biological products. This summary should include a focus on veterinary public health considerations relating to the use of these products in food-producing animals.

§ Role and function in these programmes of the Veterinary Authority and other Veterinary Services to be described in summary form.

8. Quality systems

a. Accreditation

Details and evidence of any current, formal accreditation by external agencies of the Veterinary Services of any components thereof.

b. Quality manuals

Documented details of the quality manuals and standards which describe the accredited quality systems of the Veterinary Services.

c. Audit

Details of independent (and internal) audit reports which have been undertaken of the Veterinary Services of components thereof.

9. Performance assessment and audit programmes

a. Strategic plans and review

i. Descriptive summary and copies of strategic and operational plans of the Veterinary Services organisation.

ii. Descriptive summary of corporate performance assessment programmes which relate to the strategic and operational plans - copies of recent review reports.

b. Compliance

Descriptive summary of any compliance unit which monitors the work of the Veterinary Services (or elements thereof).

c. Annual reports of the Veterinary Authority

Copies of official annual reports of the national (sub-national) Veterinary Authority.

d. Other reports

i. Copies of reports of official reviews into the function or role of the Veterinary Services which have been conducted within the past three years.

ii. Descriptive summary (and copy of reports if available) of subsequent action taken on recommendations made in these reviews.

e. Training

i. Descriptive summary of in-service and development programmes provided by the Veterinary Services (or their parent Ministries) for relevant staff.

ii. Summary descriptions of training courses and duration.

iii. Details of staff numbers (and their function) who participated in these training courses in the last three years.

f. Publications

Bibliographical list of scientific publications by staff members of Veterinary Services in the past three years.

g. Sources of independent scientific expertise

List of local and international universities, scientific institutions and recognised veterinary organisations with which the Veterinary Services have consultation or advisory mechanisms in place.

10. Membership of the OIE



State if country is a member of the OIE and period of membership.

11. Other assessment criteria
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