Tentative Schedule Advanced Placement English 3



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Tentative Schedule

Advanced Placement English 3

2014-15

May


Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

4B Review Rhet Analysis

“Walk . . . By” Staples



5C Return Ann. Bib.

Staples


6D AP MC Exam


7A Go over the MC Exam

Bring in articles & notes for Grand Finale




8B (US Hist AP exam)

Go over MC Exam

Bring in articles & notes for Grand Finale


11C 4-Go over MC

Presentation of Words.

3-Persuasive essay structure. Promptdiscussion.


12D Rhetorical An. Of piece before 1900-Give piece that day. Students take notes. Discuss as a class.



13A AP EXAM! For you princes and princesses of Livingston, you kings and queens of the country!—a rewording of an epithet from John Irving’s Cider House Rules.

14B Per 4

HAMLET



15C

Per 3 HAMLET

Per 4 Vietnam speakers


18D Lottery

Rubrics


Organizing papers

19A HAMLET

20B HAMLET

21C

Bring a draft of your paper



22Memorial Day

25 Memorial Day

26D HAMLET

27A HAMLET

28B HAMLET

29C

Papers due. First projects-10 minutes each-3 projects




2D

Per 3-JQ, RL, AB

Per 4MV, JM,AL



3A

Per.3 MC, NM, SPars



4B

Per4-LS,PM,RA




5C Both

Per.3-CD,RS,GS

Per4-IB,NV,RK



6C

Per 3-GH, TJ,DL

Per 4-MC, TC, JH


9D

Per. 3-EW, SParv

Per 4 DZ,LS, KL


10A

HAMLET or Ethical dilemmas (Peter Singer)



11B

Per4 SK,PN,SR, JL



12C


13D

March-April

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

2 B Period 4

CH 3, 4, 5

SH5

(PARCC Week-shortened periods)



HW-ch. 6 Wed.

3C BOTH

Chunks of narrative~Tralf. Book-link motifs, anecdotes

Tralfamadore spoke diagram


4D BOTH

Ch. 6


Colors

5A Per. 3

*Family Pictures

*Firestorm over Dresden


6B Per 4

*Family Pictures

*Firestorm over Dresden

HW-Finish the book.



9C Both

Looking atSH5 like a poem:

Ilium-Troy, Odyssey-Homer, blind poet, sightvsinsight-optometristsjourney fathers&sons,


10D Both

Graphics


Domes

Maori


11A Per. 3

List of characters-infer ideologies via behaviors and descriptions.

Connect to end-Billy and MW.

Pilgrim’s Progress



12B Per 4



13C Both

Essay re: SH5

HW-Read book for project.

Study


Read the Cover of In Cold Blood

16D Both

*Academic Honesty

*Reading graphics in ICB./IParagraph 1

HW-See Days



17A Per. 3

Due First 36 pages of Section 1=due

READING QUIZ

GOALS: Empiricism, induction, inferences, ethics.

Setting, personages, attitude toward all of them. Author’s attitude?


18B Per. 4

First 36 pages of Section 1=due




19C Both

End of Section I is due.


HW-

20D Both

Due Section 2

(77-106)


23A Per 3

Perry/Dick notes

WDCT?

Due: End part 2



24B Per 4

Groups


WDCT?

End Part 2



25C BOTH

Due: to 203

Perry/Dick Flicks


26D BOTH

Due: 204-248 P/D(Section 3

Papers Returned


27A TEDtalks-models for the final project.

SPRING BREAK









April 6B TEDtalks

7C BOTH Book for Grand Finale-Writing i

8DBOTH ICB Part 4

251-271 Logic (logos)



9A Per 4 M Classes

Jr. Prom at night



10B Excused Absences

13C BOTH

Finish ICB



14DBoth

Synthesis Essay re: ICB



15A Per 3

“Singer Solution Poverty”-Shea: logic, allusion, logos, analogy, pathos



16B Per 4

“Singer Solution”



17C BOTH

Work on Annotated Bib in class.



20 D BOTH

Annotated Bib.

Swift’s “Modest Proposal”-Shea


21A Per. 3

Swift – Strategies to “convince” the audience. Satire.



22 B Per. 4

Swift


23C Both

MLK “Letter from Birmingham Jail” Shea



24D Both

MLK


27A Per. 3

King


28B Per. 4

King


29C

Salesman


30D

AP Rhetorical Essay



May 1A Review Rhet Ana.“Walk ” Staples

February
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday



2C Multiple Choice Dept. Reading Comp. Assessment

3D GG CH. 3,4, 5 DUE

(Reviewed ch. 5)


HW-Rev. 2, 3, 4-Be prepared to discuss.

ch. 6 due Friday



4A Per. 3

Dept. Midterm MC Reading Comprehension Assessment




5B Per. 4

Dept. Midterm MC Reading Comprehension Assessment




6C Show schedule.

Ch. 6 due-Rev.2, 3, 4

Gatsby

Class


Citizenship

Language


Love

The American dream

Seton Hall Essay Contest essay due-follow the format

HW-Finish Gatsby



9D both Gatsby

“the shoot out at the Plaza Hotel” ch. 7



19A per. 3

Ch. 8-9


11B per 4

Ch.8-9


12C BOTH

Gatsby Essay-Timed



13D BOTH

PAARC simulation

Send in essays to Seton Hall
HW-

1. Do PAARC practice test: 2.PAARC.pearson.com Come up with a topic for project. We can converse over Edmodo over vacation. Everyone can ask questions re: it.



16 FEBRUARY BREAK

17 

18 

19 

20 

23A Period 3

1.Discuss PAARC test.

2.HW PARCC ?s about SH5 for Wednesday-each student, 1 page. Assign pages.

3.Discuss Project.

HW-Read book by 3/20. Have the book approved by me first—by March 2-3.

4.Discuss Kurt Vonnegut:

“Please . . .”


24B Period 4



25C BOTH

1.Photos-The Holocaust


Chapter 1 SH5

Parcc questions in Tii.

Discuss.

HW-Chapter 2 Thursday



26D BOTH
CH2

HW: Chapter 3.



27A/March 1 3& 4
CH3
Hw-Per. 3-ch. 4 and 5 Monday

Per. 4-Be ready to discuss ch. 3, 4, 5 Tuesday.



January: Happy New Year!

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

5D All of Henrietta Lacks=due

6A per 2

7B per 3

8C Writing about HL

9D Returned editorialist paper

12A per. 2

Goals: 1.Continuity in writing (transitions, organization)

2.Cliches

Material:NY Times articles



13B per. 3



14C 

Write a rhetorical analysis of a book read independently.



15D “Battle Royal”

Goal:


  1. Rhetoric

  2. Theme: Liberty and Justice

16A Seeing Old Texts with New Eyes: Our National Anthem and Other Songs.

Goals: Rhetorical Analysis

19 MLK DAY

20B Finish Thoreau!

21C Midterm Writing Assessment

HW: Read Chapter 1 of The Great Gatsby




22D Chapter 1

Goals:Rhetoric, characterization,theme,


HW-Read Chapter 2 GG

23A GG

26B Per 4.

GG


27C SNOW DAY

28D

Gatsby-Chapter 1

1stperson narr.

Nick-irony, paradox.



29A

1.Competitions

2.GG TOM, HOUSES, TOM & DAISY PROOF!

HW-CHAPTERS 4&5 DUE 2/3



30B PERIOD 4


December

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday



1C Both

Works Consulted for Edit. Proj.due

Paper and tii.

How to have an informed opinion about Ferguson.

GOALS:

1.Liberty and Justice



2.Close Reading.

3.Lit. bef. 1900

4.Analysis.


2D Both

Henrietta Lacks distributed.



3A Per 3

“Civil Disobedience”



4B Per 4

“Civil Disobedience”



5C

AP Mult. Choice

Both-Ed.Proj.

Extensive, conscientious, easy-to-read Annotations=due



8D HL-pages 1-83

Read Section 2. Take notes on info and types of rhetoric.




9A Period 3

Read Section 2



10B Period 4

Read Section 2



11C Discuss Thoreau-Most important word on each page.

Return APMC quizzes + annotations.



12D

HL –Section 1

Discuss.

Show examples of writing for the project.



15A HL Section 2 is due.

16B

17C Drafts for project are due-paper and turnitin.com

18D

1.To Media Center for nonfiction book.



19A

Pool Info HL:

1.Logical Fallacies

2.Deductive Arguments.

3.Ethical Dilemmas

4.Themes


22B HL



23C Editorial Project is due-paper and turnitin.com

24 WINTER BREAK

25WINTER BREAK

26WINTER BREAK

November


3C Scarlet Letter Essay Returned-Students Revise using calves

4D Awakening-Are we prepared for the closing? Motifs

1.Gave HW for next week. See below. 2.For 11/11. Choose 3 editorialists for semester project



5A per 3

An Inconvenient Truth-New COW-Students respond to film in turnitin.com

TEACHERS’ CONV.

TEACHERS’ CONV.

10B Per. 4. An Inconvenient Truth

11CBoth Lottery for editorialists Due: Thoreau “Where I Loved” 276 ?s on 281-2 (Not the third section) turnitin + paper

12D Both

Shea: 798 Rachel Carson 80 paragraph: What would Thoreau think of Carson? Be specific. Type turnitin.+ paper



13A per 3 Shea: 825

Wendell Berry 833-834 + Joyce Carol Oates Turnitin Blurbs + paper (for class)



14B per 4 Shea:

See 11/13.




17C

Due: Chapter 3 Shea.

Class: Planning a synthesis.

Invent and type an original thesis statement-put in Edmodo. You will use SL and Awakening as anchor texts AND two other sources in your essay.



18D Synthesis Essay re: MP1, An Inconvenient Truth,and recent readings.

Thesis-your view.

Essay-topic sentences that are ideas that support your thesis. Use at least two relevant sources at least in each paragraph.


19A Per. 3

Dist. & Review Editorialist Project

Works Consulted due 12/1 Monday

Edit and type essay-no new information. Edit sentences.

HW-Read in Shea the Declaration of Independence &

Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience” for Friday-BRING YOUR BOOK or Xerox the articles.


20B Per. 4

Edit and type essay-no new information. Edit sentences.


See 11/19.


21C Both

Bring Shea!!!!—or else! (Or Xeroxes of articles.
Finish editing.



24D AP Mult, Choice

Finish articles



25A Per. 3

To Media Center for coaching in research



26B Per. 4

To Media Center for coaching in research.



27 T-GIVING

28 T-GIVING

Core Curriculum Standards: See Goals. Formal list coming soon to your neighborhood!

October


Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday







1A per. 3

Do a class rhet. Essay of Edwards or Bradstreet.



2B per. 4



3C AP Rhet. Essay

SL ch. 1-10 + charts due.



6D both

Goal: Visual analysis

Hudson River School ptgs. (transcendentalism-and descendants.)

Blake “Ah! Sunflower!” (The sunflower climbs into the sky-toheaven) Emerson, Frost, Whitman, Ginsberg.



7A per 3

Trans. Concord, MA

1830-60

“Ah! Sunflower!”--Blake



8B per 4

Trans.


9C

Scarlet Letter/

Return essays from 10/3.

Review passages from exemplars-LCD projector.


10D both

SL-Rhet. Analysis of ch. 1.


Chap 11-15 due—re-do

Finish SL by 10/17

Charts go on turnitin.com, as usual + paper copy.


13 No Class

14APer 3

Chap. 11-15 redue

Scaffold scenes-tableaus

Ret’d charts 1-10.

Discussion mirrors an “argument”

Who is the worst character, the biggest sinner?




15B Per 4

Chap 11-15 redue

Chiaroscuro in SL-Hester on scaffold

Motif, tableau(x)

Hester on the scaffold.

Return charts ch. 1-10.

Begin image hunting.


16C Both

Chiaroscuro in SL.

Hester on scaffold.

Why do people get married?

Why did Hester get married?

Why did Hester stay in Boston?


Image hunting for each character.


17D Both

Per 3-Quiz re: end of SL. Homework-see Shea below.

Per. 4 Collect charts re: end of SL

SHEA: Read & Write it out! p.167- Appositives Ex. 2& 3

p.498+ Active verbs Ex. 1.p.698 + Coordination ex.1&2

p.999+ Subordination Ex.1&2 finish for h


20A Per 3

Rhetoric + Images about characters



21B Per4

Review images re: characters



22C Both Visualizing

Notable Passages re: inferred social criticism or author’s intent ACT OUT Last Scaffold tableau



23D Distribute The Awakening

Rhetorical essay re: Scarlet Letter

Sign in to Edmodo


24A

DODGE


Babbitt chapter 1-What is the author’s tone? What words in the passage lead you to believe that?

HW Read The Awakening ch. 1-10. Worksheet Answer questions for chapters 1-5. (See the link on my Web site.)



27B Period 4

Babbitt-Annotate

See homework for 10/28



28CBoth View Cabaret, Mack the Knife, Review Babbitt ch. 1 text/subtext &

Irony


Check HW

29DBoth

Awakening-Close reading/visualization-Act out ch. 1

HW-Finish Awakening over weekend.



30APer 3

Awakening-motifs-birds, water, awakenings-look at words that confirm

31B Per 4



September

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday



1

2

These overarching understandings provide the bulwarks for lessons this month.

*What strategies do writers use to affect their audience?

*What makes effective writing?

*What is the relationship between reading and writing?

*Why is it important to pay attention to the structure and style of a given text?

*How does interacting with other readers affect one’s understanding of a text?

3

4 All Classes.

1.Summer rdg.-hard copy (class)/ turnitin (NLT 7 a. m. on due day)

2.Mult. Choice reading check

3.Dist. Expect. Etc.

4.Dist. Shea,Rhet.tms,

HW-Orwell’s “Politics & the English Lang”

+HW Sheet Orwell

Due Per. 3 9/5

Per. 4 9/8



5 A Per. 3

Expectations

Rubric

Orwell assignment & reading due



8B Per. 4

Orwell


9C Both

Notes Returned

Timed essay re: MD.

HW- Due 9/10 Read Shea-Chapter 1



10D Both

Finish Orwell/Language discussion-words not to use.

Goal: rhetorical termsanalysis

Dist. SL & quot. Assignment for ch. 1-10. Due 10/3. Submit to turnitin.com



11A Per 3

Collins’s “The Names”



1.Rhet. Analysis.

2.Model writing a blurb

3.Reading check on Shea.

Return Summer reading quiz and quotation assignment.

HW-Rhet. Annotation of ch. 1 Moby Dick


12B Per 4



15C Both

1.MC: AP Rhet Quiz

2.Modeling—again—rhetorical annotation and explanation.

3.Students-groups to share




16D Both

Group Huddle, then presentation



17A Per. 3

Groups
HW-posted 9/14-due 9/22- Blurbs re: Columbus, Edwards, Bradstreet x2 Wheatley.



18B Per 4

Groups


19C Both

Finish Groups

Writing Lesson-SR Ret’d


22D Both (See 9/17)

4.Succinct Writ. Style

Returned SR-

LCD examples.


Appointments to meet with students.

23A Per 3

(See 9/14)

Found. of Am. Lit.

Goals:


1.Texts bef 1900

2.Rhetorical Analysis

3.Ideologies and Concepts in American literature


24B Per 4

(See 9/17)


Posted 9/14: HW Blurbs re: Emerson-“Nature,” “Rhodora,” Whitman-2 poems, Ginsburg, Frost. due-9/29

25 No School

26No School

29C both Edwards

30Dboth

Rhet. Annotation On board of Wheatley, Bradstreetx2




1A Per 3




2B Per. 4



3C SL ch1-10 due

Rhetorical Essay



See CCS below.

CCS:


Reading

Key Ideas

1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text

says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining

where the text leaves matters uncertain.

3. Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific

individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text. (SL. MD)

Craft & Structure:

4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author

uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text

(e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10). (Shea, Early Am. Lit, SL, MD)

5Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is

particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power,

persuasiveness, or beauty of the text.

8. Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the

application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning (e.g., in U.S.

Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes,

and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g., The Federalist, presidential

addresses).

9. Analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U.S.

documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of

Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s

Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features.

10. By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades

11–CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high

end of the range.



Writing

Production, etc.

1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts,

using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

a. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the

claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and

create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims,

reasons, and evidence.

b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the

most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and

limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge

level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

c. Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major

sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between

claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s)

and counterclaims.

d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to

the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports

the argument presented.

4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are

appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.(Grade-specific expectations for writing types are

defined in standards 1–3 above.)

Research:

9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis,

reflection, and research.

a. Apply grades 11–12 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Demonstrate

knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century

foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts

from the same period treat similar themes or topics”).

b. Apply grades 11–12 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., “Delineate

and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application

of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning [e.g., in U.S. Supreme

Court Case majority opinions and dissents] and the premises, purposes, and

arguments in works of public advocacy [e.g., The Federalist, presidential

addresses]”).

10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and

revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of

tasks, purposes, and audiences.



Speaking:

Comprehension & Collaboration

1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (oneon-

one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics,



texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and

persuasively.

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under

study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts

and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, wellreasoned

exchange of ideas.

b. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decisionmaking,

set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as

needed.

c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe



reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a

topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote

divergent and creative perspectives.

d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims,

and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when

possible; and determine what additional information or research is required

to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear

and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning,

alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization,

development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a

range of formal and informal tasks.

Reading

Key Ideas



1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text

says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining

where the text leaves matters uncertain.

3. Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific

individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text. (SL. MD)

Craft & Structure:

4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,

including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author

uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text

(e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10). (Shea, Early Am. Lit, SL, MD)

5Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is

particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power,

persuasiveness, or beauty of the text.

8. Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the

application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning (e.g., in U.S.

Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes,

and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g., The Federalist, presidential

addresses).

9. Analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U.S.

documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of

Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s

Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features.

10. By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades

11–CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high

end of the range.


Livingston Understandings:

Time and place affect our thinking and behavior.


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